August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Revolts

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1791: Haiti slave revolt. Former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture led a slave revolt in Haiti, West Indies. He is captured in 1802, but the revolt continues and Haitian independence is declared. Southerners are terrified by these events as they discourage the importation of slaves into the United States. (BH, see February 12, 1793; SR, see August 30, 1800)

DEATH PENALTY

August 22, 1924: the famed attorney Clarence Darrow gave a celebrated closing argument in the trial of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, on trial for the murder of Bobby Franks in Chicago. The Leopolds were two highly intellectual sons of wealthy parents who committed the murder to see if they could commit the perfect crime. Darrow’s closing argument lasted for an incredible 12 hours as he pleaded that the defendants not be sentenced to death. (He did not argue that they were innocent.) Darrow was a passionate and longtime opponent of the death penalty. At the end of his argument, the judge was in tears, and he then sentenced the two to life in prison. (see May 1, 1932)

US Labor History & Feminism

August 22, 1945: five flight attendants form the Air Line Stewardesses Association, the first labor union representing flight attendants. They were reacting to an industry in which women were forced to retire at the age of 32, remain single, and adhere to strict weight, height and appearance requirements. The association later became the Association of Flight Attendants, now a division of the Communications Workers of America.
US Labor History & Feminism
August 22, 1945: five flight attendants form the Air Line Stewardesses Association, the first labor union representing flight attendants. They were reacting to an industry in which women were forced to retire at the age of 32, remain single, and adhere to strict weight, height and appearance requirements. The association later became the Association of Flight Attendants, now a division of the Communications Workers of America.
Post-war strikes
In 1946, workers struck to win wage increases in the face of postwar inflation. The wave of strikes was the worst since 1919 and included general strikes in Hartford, Houston, Oakland, and other cities. (see Jan 16
BLACK HISTORY & Feminism
In 1946, The Women’s Political Council formed as a civic organization for African-American professional women in Montgomery, Alabama. It was inspired by the Atlanta Neighborhood Union. Many of its middle-class women were active in education; most of WPC's members were educators at Alabama State College or Montgomery's public schools. About forty women attended the first organizational meeting. Mary Fair Burks, who was head of Alabama State's English department, was the group's first president. (Feminism, see July 9, 1947)

Voting Rights

19th Amendment
August 22, 1973: after voting to ratify the 1920 amendment in 1969, South Carolina certified the 19th Amendment. (Feminism, see Sept 20, 1973; Voting Rights, see Aug 22, 1978)
District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment
August 22, 1978: Congress passed as a resolution the District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment, which proposed to give the District full representation in the United States Congress, full representation in the Electoral College system, and full participation in the process by which the U.S. Constitution is amended. (see August 22, 1986)

August 22, 1986: the deadline for the District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment passed. It required the approval of lawmakers in at least 38 of the 50 states. It was ratified by the legislatures of only 16 states (see June 30, 1995):
  • New Jersey on Sept 11, 1978
  • Michigan on December 13, 1978
  • Ohio on December 21, 1978
  • Minnesota on March 19, 1979
  • Massachusetts on Mar 19, 1979
  • Connecticut on April 11, 1979
  • Connecticut on April 11, 1979
  • Wisconsin on November 1, 1979
  • Maryland on March 19, 1980
  • Hawaii on April 17, 1980
  • Oregon on July 6, 1981
  • Maine on February 16, 1983
  • West Virginia on Feb 23, 1983
  • Rhode Island on May 13, 1983
  • Iowa on January 19, 1984
  • Louisiana on June 24, 1984
  • Delaware on June 28, 1984
US Labor History, Feminism & Nuclear/Chemical News

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1986: The Kerr-McGee Corp. agreed to pay the estate of the late Karen Silkwood $1.38 million, settling a 10-year-old nuclear contamination lawsuit. She was a union activist who died in 1974 under suspicious circumstances on her way to talk to a reporter about safety concerns at her plutonium fuel plant in Oklahoma. (LH, & Feminism, see Oct 6; Nuclear, see February 28, 1987)

Vietnam

Opposition estimation
August 22, 1962: Kennedy administration officials quoted in The New York Times estimated that there were 20,000 guerrilla troops in South Vietnam. Despite hundreds of engagements during the preceding two months and encouraging victories for South Vietnamese forces, the Viet Cong (aka, National Liberation Front) had grown in numbers, and U.S. officials felt that the war had reached a point of stalemate. (see Dec 2)
1972 Republican National Convention

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1972: the Republican National Convention in Miami Beach, Florida renominated President Nixon and Vice President Agnew for a second term. 3,000 antiwar demonstrators, many painted with death masks harassed delegates entering the Convention. The rest of the convention was marked by demonstrations outside the meeting hall; police arrested hundreds of protesters and injured many. (see Sept 17)

August 22 Music et al

Beatles
Cavern performance filmed
August 22, 1962: Granada Television filmed The Beatles during a lunchtime gig at Liverpool's Cavern Club for the show "Know The North". It would be their very first filmed performance. However, it was not aired at the time. At the end of one song, fans can be heard shouting "We want Pete!" in reference to drummer Pete Best, who'd just been kicked out of the group.

see Ringo leaves for more
August 22, 1968: tensions had been building within The Beatles for some time during the recording of the White Album. On this day matters came to a head, and Ringo  left the group. Later, Ringo stated. “While we were recording the 'White' album we ended up being more of a band again, and that's what I always love. I love being in a band. Of course, I must have moments of turmoil, because I left the group for a while that summer.

                I left because I felt two things: I felt I wasn't playing great, and I also felt that the other three were really happy and I was an outsider. I went to see John, who had been living in my apartment in Montagu Square with Yoko since he moved out of Kenwood. I said, 'I'm leaving the group because I'm not playing well and I feel unloved and out of it, and you three are really close.' And John said, 'I thought it was you three!'

                So then I went over to Paul's and knocked on his door. I said the same thing: 'I'm leaving the band. I feel you three guys are really close and I'm out of it.' And Paul said, 'I thought it was you three!'

The news of Ringo's departure was kept secret. After Ringo walked out, the remaining Beatles recorded 'Back In the USSR', with Paul on drums and John playing bass. (Beatles, see August 23; Ringo, see Sept 3)
Beatles final photo session

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1969: The Beatles met at John Lennon's Tittenhurst Park home in England for their final ever photo session. Three shots from this session (by Ethan Russell) formed the front and back covers of the Capitol compilation album Hey Jude. Yoko Ono and a pregnant Linda McCartney (she was to give birth to daughter Mary six days later) appeared in some photographs with The Beatles (see Sept 13)
Parole denial
August 22, 2012: Mark Chapman, 57, denied parole for a seventh time, Chapman has been given a parole hearing every two years since 2000 and has been turned down each time. (see February 16, 2013)
Where Did Our Love Go
August 22 – September 14, 1964: “Where Did Our Love Go” by The Supremes #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, their first of 13 #1 songs in the 1960s.
 
August 22 Peace Love Activism

Fair Housing

August 22, 1974: The Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 enacted. It amended the Housing Act of 1937 to create Section 8 housing [rent supplement] , authorized "Entitlement Communities Grants" to be awarded by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, and created the National Institute of Building Sciences. Under Section 810 of the Act the first federal Urban Homesteading program was created. (see April 20, 1976)
SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE
August 22, 2003: Alabama suspended its chief justice, Roy Moore,  for his refusal to obey a federal court order to remove his Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of his courthouse. (see Aug 28)

August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, August 22 Peace Love Activism, 

 

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.