February 27 Peace Love Activism

February 27 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

Voting Rights
February 27, 1922: in Leser v. Garnett the US Supreme Court held, that the Nineteenth Amendment to the US  Constitution had been constitutionally established. (Feminsim, see Sept 22; VR, see March 7, 1927)

US Labor History

Woolworth’s

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1937: four hundred fifty Woolworth’s workers and customers occupied a store in Detroit for eight days in support of Waiters and Waitresses Union. (see Mar 1)
Sit-down strikes

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1939: the Supreme Court, in National Labor Relations Board v. Fansteel Metallurgical Corp., effectively outlawed sit-down strikes. (see June 5)
Montana Coal and Iron Company

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1943: an explosion at the Montana Coal and Iron Company mine killed 74 workers. It was the worst mining disaster in Montana's history. The small communities of Washoe and Bearcreek, Montana, consisted almost entirely of mine workers and their families. Many of them worked Smith Mine #3 for the Montana Coal and Iron Company. On a cold Saturday morning, February 27, 77 men were working in the mine when, at 9:30 a.m., a huge explosion rang out. The people of Washoe and Bearcreek heard the roar and then the long, wailing siren that followed. The exact cause of the explosion is not known, though some of the company's miners claimed methane gas had built up in some abandoned shafts and was ignited after a cave-in. Of the 77 workers in the mine at the time of the explosion, only three made it out alive. (see May 31)

BLACK HISTORY

Detroit

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1943: with a cross burning in a field near the homes, 150 angry whites picketed the a Detroit housing project vowing to keep out any Black homeowners. (see Feb 28)
Wharlest Jackson

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1967: the Armstrong Tire & Rubber plant in Natchez, Tennessee had offered Wharlest Jackson a promotion to its chemical mixing plant. Jackson had worked at the plant for 12 years and was also the treasurer of the local NAACP chapter. 

On February 27, 1967, as Jackson was driving home from work, a bomb exploded in his 1958 Chevrolet truck, killing him instantly. The Natchez Police Department arrived on the scene and found Jackson’s truck blown to bits – the blast blew out the top of the truck, the front and rear glass, both doors and the hood.

The Natchez community was shocked and appalled by Jackson’s murder. Charles Evers and the Natchez NAACP organized a protest, leading 2,000 demonstrators to watch the changing of the shift at the Armstrong plant. From the Armstrong plant, the demonstrators marched to the place where Jackson died, and then to Rosehill Baptist Church, where they had an hour-long meeting. Even Governor Paul Johnson, infamously hostile to the NAACP, called Jackson’s murder “an act of savagery which stains the honor of our state.”

After Jackson’s death, the FBI launched an intensive probe that it quickly expanded to include other Klan-related murders and crimes. Investigators speculated that Jackson was a victim of the Silver Dollar Group, a violent, heavily armed cell of the Ku Klux Klan. The Silver Dollar Group had about 20 members, each of whom carried a silver dollar minted in the year he was born as evidence of membership in the cell. Several members had experience with explosives. The FBI identified Raleigh Jackson “Red” Glover, the leader of the Silver Dollar Group, as the primary suspect in both the Jackson and Metcalfe bombings.

 No one was ever been convicted for the crime. (see March 2)

February 27 Music et al

February 27 – March 19, 1961: “Pony Time” by Chubby Checker #1 Billboard Hot 100.

Vietnam

President Ngo Dinh Diem
February 27, 1962: South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem survived another coup attempt when Republic of Vietnam Air Force pilots Lieutenants Pham Phu Quoc and Nguyen Van Cu tried to kill him and his brother Ngo Dinh Nhu by bombing and strafing the presidential palace. Lieutenant Quoc was arrested after his fighter-bomber crash-landed near Saigon. Lieutenant Cu fled to Cambodia, where he remained until November 1963. (see Aug 22)
Walter Cronkite
February 27, 1968: the well-respected CBS TV news anchorman Walter Cronkite, who had just returned from Saigon, told Americans during his CBS Evening News broadcast that he was certain "the bloody experience of Vietnam was to end in a stalemate." (see March 14)

STUDENT ACTIVISM

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1969: police charged student picket lines, club and arrested two Chicano leaders at U.C. Berkeley; thousands rampage thru nine buildings at U of Wisconsin, Madison over black enrollments. (Vietnam, see March; SA, see April)
Religion and Public Education

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27 – 28, 1963:  Abington School District v. Schempp argued before the US Supreme Court In her opening statement Madalyn Murray, an atheist, said, in part:

                "Your petitioners are atheists and they define their beliefs as follows. An atheist loves his fellow man instead of god. An atheist believes that heaven is something for which we should work now – here on earth for all men together to enjoy. An atheist believes that he can get no help through prayer but that he must find in himself the inner conviction and strength to meet life, to grapple with it, to subdue it, and enjoy it. An atheist believes that only in a knowledge of himself and a knowledge of his fellow man can he find the understanding that will help to a life of fulfillment. He seeks to know himself and his fellow man rather than to know a god. An atheist believes that a hospital should be built instead of a church. An atheist believes that a deed must be done instead of a prayer said. An atheist strives for involvement in life and not escape into death. He wants disease conquered, poverty vanquished, war eliminated. He wants man to understand and love man. He wants an ethical way of life. He believes that we cannot rely on a god or channel action into prayer nor hope for an end of troubles in a hereafter. He believes that we are our brother's keepers and are keepers of our own lives; that we are responsible persons and the job is here and the time is now." (see June 17, 1963)

Native Americans

Russell C Means

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1973: members of the Lakota Sioux tribe on the Pine Ridge reservation attempted to have Dick Wilson, the Bureau of Indian Affairs-backed head of the tribal administration, impeached, they received resistance from the federal government, which wanted to keep Wilson in power. Led by leader Russell Means, AIM seized control of Wounded Knee (site of the 1890 massacre) and the perimeter is placed under siege for 71 days.  (see March 2)

Sexual Abuse of Children

Rev. Bruce Ritter

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27,1990: the Rev. Bruce Ritter, celebrated leader of Covenant House for teen runaways, stepped down amid a scandal. He denied an accusation of molestation from one youth, but others step forward to accuse him and the Covenant House board reports extensive misconduct. Ritter's Franciscan superiors in Rome approved a transfer to India, but outrage following a news report about the move forces the plan to be scrapped. (see 1991)
National Review Board

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 2004: the National Review Board, a lay panel formed by Catholic bishops, issued two studies documenting the molestation problem. One ws the first church-sanctioned tally of abuse cases, finding 10,667 abuse claims against about 4 percent of all American clerics from 1950 to 2002. The second report puts much of the blame on American bishops for not cracking down on errant priests. (see July 1)

Environmental Issues

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism

February 27, 1990: Exxon and its shipping company were indicted on 5 criminal counts for the Exxon Valdez oil spill. (see March 19)

IRAQ War I

February 27, 1991: President George H. W. Bush announced a ceasefire and that Kuwait had been liberated from Iraqi occupation. (see Mar 17)

FREE SPEECH & The Red Scare

February 27, 1997: Frank Wilkinson, once banned from speaking at the University of North Carolina, returned to Chapel Hill to speak at the UNC Law School. (FS, see December 23, 2003;  RS, see March 21, 1999)

LGBTQ

Kentucky
February 27, 2014: U.S. District Court Judge John Heyburn ordered Kentucky officials to recognize the marriages of same-sex couples performed out of state.

                Heyburn ruled that Kentucky's Constitution and laws banning recognition of such marriages "violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution, and they are void and unenforceable." The decision amounted to a final ruling of his Feb. 12 opinion in the case.

                Attorney Dan Canon, a lawyer for the four gay and lesbian couples who won the case, said: "We are cautiously optimistic. The order has been granted without qualification and without a stay."
Walt Disney World
February 27, 2014: Walt Disney World announced that it would no longer subsidize local chapters of the Boy Scouts of America, in response to the national organization's continued ban on allowing LGBTQ troop leaders. (LGBTQ,see Mar 14; BSA, see May 20)

February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, 

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26 Peace Love Activism

Immigration History/US Labor History

February 26, 1885: Alien Contract Labor Law, also known as the Foran Act, was an act to prohibit the importation and migration of foreigners and aliens under contract or agreement to perform labor in the United States, its Territories, and the District of Columbia. (see Sept 2; Alien Contract Law, see February 7, 1887)

Technological Milestone

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1908: at midnight, service through the Hudson & Manhattan railway tunnels opened to the public, carrying passengers between Manhattan and Hoboken New Jersey. It was the first railroad tunnel under a major river in the U.S. (see Sept 26)

BLACK HISTORY

Mink Slide district
February 26 1946: highway patrolmen entered the Mink Slide district. The officers fired randomly into buildings, stole cash and goods, searched homes without warrants, and took any guns, rifles, and shotguns they could find. When the sweep was over, more than one hundred blacks had been arrested, and about three hundred weapons from the black community had been confiscated. None of the accused were granted bail or allowed legal counsel. (see Feb 28)
Muhammad Ali

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1964: the day after he defeated Sonny Liston, “Cassius X” announced membership in Nation of Islam. His announcement was a bold step, jeopardizing potential boxing and money-making opportunities. (see March 6)
Malcolm X
February 26, 1965: police arrested Norman Butler for the murder of Malcom X. (MX, see October 15, 1966)
Jimmie Lee Jackson
February 26, 1965:  Jimmie Lee Jackson died at Good Samaritan Hospital in Selma. After his death, Sister Michael Anne, an administrator at Good Samaritan, said there were powder burns on Mr. Jackson's abdomen, indicating that he was shot at very close range. When civil rights organizer, James Bevel, heard of Jackson's death he called for a march from Selma to Montgomery to talk to Governor George Wallace about the attack in which Jackson was shot.  (BH, see March 1; March to Selma, see March 7)

Nuclear/Chemical Weapons News

February 26, 1952:  Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced that Britain had developed its own atomic bomb. (see Apr 22)

Vietnam

South Korean troops

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1965: the first contingent of South Korean troops arrived in Saigon. Although assigned to non-combat duties, they came under fire on April 3. The South Korean contingent was part of the Free World Military Forces, an effort by President Lyndon B. Johnson to enlist allies for the United States and South Vietnam. By securing support from other nations, Johnson hoped to build an international consensus behind his policies in Vietnam. The effort was also known as the "many flags" program. By the close of 1969, there were over 47,800 Korean soldiers actively involved in combat operations in South Vietnam. Seoul began to withdraw its troops in February 1972. (see Mar 1)
My Lai Massacre

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1971: despite the conclusion that General Koster was the motivating force behind the cover-up, charges against Koster were dropped. Koster‘s only reprimand comes in the form of a reduction in rank. (My Lai, see March 29; Vietnam, see “in March”)

US Labor History & Feminism

February 26, 1965: the TWA employees union challenged the forced retirement of stewardesses on this day. These women were also forbidden to marry and were monitored for their weight. This event was one of a number of growing challenges to the discriminatory policies regarding female flight attendants. By the end of the 1970s, the discriminatory practices against them were gone, and the job had the unisex title of Flight Attendant. (Labor, see January 1, 1966; F, see January 20, 1966)

February 26 Music et al

February 26 – March 4, 1966: “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’” by Nancy Sinatra #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Cultural Milestone

February 26, 1970: National Public Radio was incorporated. (see February 17, 1972)

Environmental Issues

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1972: a coal slag heap doubling as a dam in West Virginia’s Buffalo Creek Valley collapsed, flooding the 17-mile long valley. 118 died, 5,000 were left homeless. The Pittston Coal Co. said it was "an act of God" (see June 14)

Terrorism

Beirut, Lebanon
February 26, 1984: United States Marines pull out of Beirut, Lebanon. (see Sept 20)
World Trade Center

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1993: a van packed with a 1,210-pound bomb exploded in the parking garage underneath the World Trade Center. The explosion left a gigantic crater 200 feet wide and caused over 591 million dollars in damage. Six people were killed and more than a thousand injured. (see Mar 4)
Oklahoma City Explosion
February 26, 1998: a federal appeals court affirmed Terry Nichols' conviction and sentence of life imprisonment without parole.  (see May 27)

Iran–Contra Affair

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 1988: the Tower Commission rebuked U.S. President Ronald Reagan for not controlling his National Security Council staff. (see March 4)

LGBTQ

Ben-Shalom v. Stone
February 26, 1990: refusing to consider the cases of Ben-Shalom v. Stone and Woodward v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court effectively upheld the right of the American military to discharge gays and lesbians of the armed forces. (see May 17)

Texas ban on same-sex marriage

February 26, 2014:  in San Antoinio, U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia overturned the Texas ban on same-sex marriage ruling that the prohibition was unconstitutional and stigmatized the relationship of gay couples. The ruling did not allow same-sex couples to immediately marry because the judge stayed the injunction pending any appeal.

Garcia ruled that the state’s ban deprived same sex couples of due process and equal protection, stigmatizing their relationships and treating them differently from opposite-sex couples. “Today’s court decision is not made in defiance of the great people of Texas or the Texas Legislature, but in compliance with the U.S. Constitution and Supreme Court precedent,” Garcia said. (see Feb 27)

IRAQ War I

February 26, 1991: Saddam Hussein announced the withdrawal of Iraqi troops from Kuwait. Iraqi soldiers set fire to Kuwaiti oil fields as they retreated. (see Feb 27)

Birth Control

February 26, 1992: the Supreme Court of Ireland rules that a 14-year-old rape victim may travel to England to have an abortion. (see June 29)

STAND YOUR GROUND LAW

Trayvon Martin Shooting

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 2012: George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch captain, shot and killed Trayvon Martin, 17. Zimmerman told police he fired in self-defense. Zimmerman confronted the teen after calling 911 and reporting Martin as a "suspicious person." Though a dispatcher told Zimmerman not to follow the teen, Zimmerman confronted him nevertheless, police said. Martin died from a gunshot wound to the chest. (Stand Your Ground, see Mar 14; Trayvon, see March 21)

Marijuana

Washington, D.C

February 26 Peace Love Activism

February 26, 2015: after months of debate, threats and uncertainty, recreational marijuana became legal in Washington, D.C.,at least according to the city government. Adults 21 and over could legally use marijuana, possess up to two ounces and grow up to six marijuana plants in their homes for personal use. Marijuana sales remained illegal, but the District Council was considering a bill that would regulate and tax marijuana sales, similar to laws in Colorado and Washington state. Because of the city's unique oversight by Congress, it was unclear if any measure legalizing marijuana sales and regulation could go into effect before 2016. (see May 3)

 

 

Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian

Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian

Elpidio “Pete” Cobian

Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian

Continuing with my mini bios for those Woodstock Music and Art Fair performers for whom I have not found a birth date (the day I typically post the bio)...

Elpidio "Pete" Cobian had been in the California version of Jay Walker and the Pedestrians, the band Robert 'Bob' Barboza had originally formed in Rhode Island and re-formed with different members when he re-located to Los Angeles. Cobian played congas.

Pete was with the band that April 1967 night when Nanci Nevins walked in to watch Jay and the Pedestrians play. The band, by choice, had no vocalist, but saw her standing and singing along. They invited her up to perform, not usual since the actual members in the band varied with the date. Sometimes there were 7 members, sometimes more than 2 dozen.

Pete and the others liked what they heard, but Nevins left without giving them her name or contact information. Life went on.

They eventually did find her and she briefly became a Pedestrian. Briefly because  band member Alex Del Zoppo suggested to other members Albert Moore,  Andy Friend, and Pete that with the Nevins as vocalist they could expand their possibilities the four as a new band.

Sweetwater

And so they sowed the seed of Sweetwater.

Their Woodstock Music and Art Fair appearance is one of the many typical side stories that that disheveled weekend tells. Stuck in Liberty because of an historic traffic jam, organizers drafted a reluctant Richie Havens to open the festival.

Finally on site, Sweetwater followed. Ironically, their opening song, one they had played dozens of times, was an echo of the now-famous rendition that Havens had closed with: Motherless Child (with Havens extemporaneous "Freedom" tagged on).

Sweetwater did not make the 1970 Woodstock album. Sweetwater did not make the 1970 Woodstock movie. And before all that, in December 1969, a drunk driver's crashing into Nancy Nevins's car nearly killed her and kept her out of music for nearly a quarter century.

In the meantime, the band released two more albums, but gradually broke up and members went their own way. Some continued in music.

Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian

According the the Sweetwater band site, "In 1994, Sweetwater conducted a reunion to commemorate Woodstock’s 25th anniversary. Attempts were made, but no one was able to find out what had happened to Elpidio, our former conga player. A few years later, we learned Elpidio still plays occasionally with groups, but has had a really successful career working for the film studios on their set crews. He worked on underwater sets, principally as a welder, for such hit movies as “Jaws” and “The Abyss”, among others. He has a wife, Evelyn, and two adult sons, Orlando and Mario."

Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian, Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian, Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian, Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian, Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian, Sweetwater Elpidio Cobian, 

What's so funny about peace, love, and activism?