Tag Archives: May Peace Love Art Activism

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Cultural Milestones

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31, 1884: Dr. John Harvey Kellogg applied for a patent for “flaked cereal.”  He was trying to improve the vegetarian diet of his hospital patients, by searching for a digestible bread-substitute by the process of boiling wheat. Kellogg accidentally left a pot of boiled wheat to stand and it become tempered. When it was put through a rolling process, each grain of wheat emerged as a large, thin flake. When the flakes were baked, they became crisp and light, creating an easy to prepare breakfast when milk was added. [Forbes article]  (CM see February 18, 1885; Kellogg, see February 19, 1906)

Seinfeld

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31, 1990: the sitcom “Seinfeld” premiered on NBC (see December 22, 1992)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Tulsa Race Riot

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31 and June 1, 1921: The Tulsa Race Riot was a large-scale racially motivated conflict in which whites attacked the Tulsa, Oklahoma black community of the Greenwood District, also known as ‘the Black Wall Street’ and the wealthiest African-American community in the United States, being burned to the ground. During the 16 hours of the assault, over 800 people were admitted to local hospitals with injuries, and more than 6,000 Greenwood residents were arrested and detained. An estimated 10,000 blacks were left homeless, and 35 city blocks composed of 1,256 residences were destroyed by fire. [Tulsa History article] (BH, see Oct 5; RR, see March 19, 1935; Tulsa, see February 21, 2001)

Detroit Packard Motor Car Co

May 31, 1943: some 25,000 white autoworkers walked off the job at a Detroit Packard Motor Car Co. plant, heavily involved in wartime production, when Packard promoted three black workers to work on a previously all-white assembly line. The black workers were relocated and the whites returned. [images] (BH see June 15; Labor, see June 25)

Brown II case

May 31, 1955: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (the so-called Brown II case) In Brown II the US Supreme Court delegated the task of carrying out the desegregation to district courts with orders that desegregation occur with all deliberate speed.” School districts would use the “deliberate speed” phrase to delay or postpone indefinitely school desegregation. [Oyez article] (BH, see June 29; SD, see March 12, 1956)

James H Meredith

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31, 1961: the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed suit in the U.S. District Court, alleging that the university had rejected Meredith only because of the color of his skin, as he had a highly successful record. (BH, see, June 12; Meredith, see July 28, 1962)

Michael Schwerner & Earl Chaney speak

May 31, 1964: Michael Henry Schwerner (24, New York) and James Earl Chaney (21, Meridian, Mississippi) speak at the Mt. Zion United Methodist Church in the Longdale community, just west of Philadelphia in Neshoba County. They and church members were making plans for the church to house a Freedom School. (BH, see June 1; Schwerner,  see June 21)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

May 31, 1946: Ho Chi Minh left for Paris to iron out the reality of Vietnam as an autonomous state only to find that the French will not specifiy what is actually meant. During the four months that Minh was in France, his General Vo Nguyen Giap conducted a merciless purge killing landlords and moneylenders and members of rival parties. He imprisoned thousands of others. (see In November)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

 

see May 31 Music et al for much more

Jimi Hendrix enlists

May 31, 1961: Hendrix (19 years old) enlisted in the Army after  being caught for a second time riding in stolen cars and given a choice between spending two years in prison or joining the Army. After completing basic training, he was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division and stationed in Fort Campbell, Kentucky. (see “in November”)

Hendrix discharged

May 31, 1962: paperwork was filled recommending a discharge for Hendrix. (see June 29)

White album begins

May 31, 1968: began recording the so-called “White Album. Sessions will span 4+ months, ending on Oct 14. (see July 17)

Grateful Dead

May 31, 2017: Jerry Garcia’s famous Wolf guitar sold at auction for over $1.9 million. “Wolf” was Garcia’s go-to instrument for over two decades. The Grateful Dead singer-guitarist first wielded the instrument during a 1973 show for the Hell’s Angels in New York City.

Timothy Leary

May 31, 1996: Timothy Leary died. (see November 10, 2001)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Native Americans

Alcatraz Takeover

May 31, 1970: the federal government shut off power and stopped fresh water supplies on its property. Hundreds of Indians flock to the island to protest the government’s plan to turn the island into a park. (see June 2)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

W. A. Boyle

May 31, 1985: Boyle, the powerful leader of the nation’s coal miners until he was convicted of embezzlement and of ordering the murder of union rival Joseph Yablonski and his family, died at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. He was 83 years old. [Native Village article] (see June 27)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

The Cold War

Nuclear/Chemical News

May 31, 1994: President Bill Clinton pledged continued cooperation with Russia in a New World Order, declaring that the U.S. would no longer point nuclear missiles at Russia, ending the antagonism and fear of mutually assured destruction that characterized the half-century-long Cold War between the two superpowers.. (NN, see January 25, 1995; CW, see Aug 18)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Women’s Health

Eric Rudolph

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31, 2003: police arrested Eric Rudolph, suspected in bombings at a Birmingham. Ala., abortion clinic and at the Atlanta Olympics, outside a grocery store in Murphy, N.C. (see April 8,  2005)

Scott Roeder

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31, 2009: Scott Roeder assassinated women’s health care provider Dr George Tiller.  (Terrorism, see Dec 25; BC, see January 29, 2010)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Watergate Scandal

Deep Throat

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

May 31, 2005: W. Mark Felt’s family ended 30 years of speculation, identifying Felt, the former FBI assistant director, as “Deep Throat,” the secret source who helped unravel the Watergate scandal. The Felt family’s admission, made in an article in Vanity Fair magazine, took legendary reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who had promised to keep their source’s identity a secret until his death, by surprise. Tapes show that Nixon himself had speculated that Felt was the secret informant as early as 1973. [Felt’s 2008 NYT obit](see Watergate for expanded story)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Stop and Frisk Policy

May 31, 2011: NYPD data showed that in the first quarter of 2011, stop-and-frisk hit an all-time high. There were 183,326 stop-and-frisks between January and March 2011. (see Aug 31)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

Marijuana

May 31, 2012:  Connecticut became the 17th state to legalize medical marijuana. (see Nov 6)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

May 31, 2012: a federal appeals court ruled unanimously that the Defense of Marriage Act [DOMA] passed by Congress in 1996, discriminated against married same-sex couples by denying them the same federal benefits afforded to heterosexual couples. [NYT article] (DOMA, see October 18; LGBTQ, see June 2)

May 31 Peace Love Art Activism

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May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Denmark Vesey’s slave revolt

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

May 30, 1822: Denmark Vesey had won a lottery and purchased his emancipation in 1800. He was working as a carpenter in Charleston, South Carolina when he started  to plan a massive slave rebellion—one of the most elaborate plots in American history—involving thousands of slaves on surrounding plantations, organized into cells. They planned to start a major fire at night and then kill the slave owners and their families. A black house servant named George Wilson foiled the play when he informed his master of the pending revolt. Charleston authorities promptly arrested and interrogated dozens of suspected conspirators. Vesey was captured on June 22 and tortured but he refused to identify his comrades.

A total of 131 men were arrested; 67 were convicted and 35, including Denmark Vesey, were executed. The city destroyed Mr. Vesey’s church building. Mr. Vesey and his followers inspired abolitionists and black soldiers through the Civil War. [PBS article] (BH, see March 16, 1827; Slave Revolts, see Aug 21 – 22, 1831; Vesey, see June 17, 2015)

Alabama sues NYT and Black leaders
Free Speech

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

May 30, 1960: Alabama Governor John Patterson filed a $1,000,000 libel suit in state court against The New York Times and five Black leaders, including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  He charged The Times and the five leaders (King, Rev J E Lowery, Rev F L Shuttlesworh, Rev Ralph Abernathy, and Rev S S Seay) with “false and defamatory matter” in the advertisement soliciting funds for the defense of King in his perjury trial. [2017 NYT aticle] (see Nov 3)

UofA/Vivian Malone Jones

May 30 Peace Love Activism

May 30, 1965: Vivian Malone Jones became the first black to graduate from the University of Alabama in its 134 years of existence, earning a degree in business management with a B-plus average. The university had hired a driver for her, a student at Stillman College in Tuscaloosa named Mack Jones. They later married, and he became an obstetrician.

After graduating from Alabama, Malone worked for the US Justice Department in its civil rights division. [2005 NYT obit] (BH, see June 1)

UofA/Autherine Lucy Foster

In 1988: two professors invited Autherine Lucy Foster to speak at the University about the events that had occurred in 1956. After her speech, faculty members persuaded the Board of Trustees to overturn her expulsion. (BH, Jan 22)

In 1989, Foster again enrolled at the University of Alabama. Her daughter Grazia also was a student at the time. (BH, see Feb 10; U of A, see May 9, 1992; see Foster for expanded story)

137 SHOTS

May 30, 2014: a grand jury on indicted six police officers involved in a November 2012 car chase that ended in the deaths of two unarmed people, was decried by critics as a racially motivated execution and was part of a wide-ranging federal investigation.

May 30, 2017,: Cleveland officials announced that they had fired Timothy Loehmann, Loehmann fatally shot 12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014, setting off national protests. Officials also said that they were suspending officer Frank Garmback, driver of the patrol car that day, for 10 days

The decision came after what Mayor Frank Jackson of Cleveland called an “exhaustive process” of investigation. (see 137 for expanded story)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

Day 6 Toledo Auto-Lite strike

May 30, 1934 (Wednesday): the Toledo Central Labor Council asked President Roosevelt to intervene to avert a general strike. The CLC placed the final decision to hold a general strike in the hands of the Committee of 23, with a decision to be rendered on June 2. By this time, 85 of the CLC’s member unions had pledged to support the general strike (with one union dissenting and another reconsidering its previous decision to support the general strike). The same day, leaders of FLU 18384 met with Governor White and presented their case. The media reported that both Labor Secretary Perkins and AFL president Green might come to Toledo to help end the strike. Despite no resolution to the strike, Toledo remained peaceful. Governor White had begun withdrawing National Guard troops a few days earlier, and by May 31 only 250 remained. (see June 2)

Memorial Day Massacre

May 30, 1937: in what became known as the Memorial Day Massacre, police opened fire on striking steelworkers at Republic Steel in South Chicago, killing ten and wounding more than 160. No policemen were prosecuted. A coroner’s jury declared the killings to be “justifiable homicide”. [Chicago Now article] (see June 10)

“Norma Rae”

May 30, 1973: Crystal Lee Jordan (aka “Norma Rae”) fired for trying to organize a union at the J.P. Stevens plant in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina. [2009 NYT obit] (see Sept 19)

César E. Chávez

May 30, 1995: the Los Angeles Times reported that F.B.I. agents followed the farm labor leader César Chávez for more than seven years, investigating reports he was a Communist or “subversive.” Investigators kept a secret watch on Chávez in the 1960’s and 1970’s under the Johnson and Nixon Administrations and compiled a 1,434-page file on him. (see May 29, 1996)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

see May 30 Music et al for more

The Kingston Trio

May 30 – July 31, 1960: The Kingston Trio’s Sold Out album returns to the Billboard #1 spot after a one week absence.

Love Me Do

May 30 – June 5, 1964, The Beatles: “Love Me Do” #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. (see July 27)

1969 Festival #6

May 30 – 31, 1969: First Annual Detroit Rock & Roll Revival

Living In the Material World

May 30, 1973: George Harrison released “Living In the Material World” album (in the US), his fourth solo release and second since the Beatles’ breakup. (see June 27)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

Cold War

May 30, 1962: Fidel Castro informed visiting Soviet officials that Cuba will accept the deployment of nuclear weapons. (CW, see June 27; see Cuban Missile Crisis for expanded story)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

Nuclear/Chemical News

Pakistan

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

May 30, 1998: the second nuclear test conducted by Pakistan. [CNN article] (see September 20, 1999)

Germany

May 30, 2011:  Germany announced plans to abandon nuclear power over the next 11 years, outlining an ambitious strategy in the wake of Japan’s Fukushima disaster to replace atomic power with renewable energy sources. [Guardian article] (see Sept 12)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

Tiananmen Square

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

May 30, 1989: student demonstrators unveiled a 33 ft high Goddess of Democracy statue in Tiananmen Square. (see June 4)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

Iraq War II

May 30, 2005: Vice President Dick Cheney predicted the Iraq war would end before the Bush administration left office, saying “I think they’re in the last throes, if you will, of the insurgency,” on CNN’s “Larry King Live.” (see Oct 26)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

FREE SPEECH

May 30, 2006: Garcetti v. Ceballos was a case involving the First Amendment free speech protections for government employees. The plaintiff in the case was a district attorney who claimed that he had been passed up for a promotion for criticizing the legitimacy of a warrant. The US Supreme Court ruled, in a 5-4 decision, that because his statements were made pursuant to his position as a public employee, rather than as a private citizen, his speech had no First Amendment protection. [Oyez atricle] (see January 29, 2010)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

Stop and Frisk Policy

May 30, 2008: The NYPD was ordered to turn over stop-and-frisk data to the NYCLU. (see Sept 10)

May 30 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

May 30, 2014: the Colorado Civil Rights Commission determined that Masterpiece Cakeshop unlawfully discriminated against David Mullins and Charlie Craig by refusing to sell them a wedding cake.​

David Mullins and Charlie Craig visited Masterpiece Cakeshop in July 2012, with Craig’s mother, to order a cake for their upcoming wedding reception. Mullins and Craig planned to marry in Massachusetts and then celebrate with family and friends back home in Colorado. Masterpiece owner Jack Phillips informed them that because of his religious beliefs the store’s policy was to deny service to customers who wished to order baked goods to celebrate a same-sex couple’s wedding. (LGBTQ, see June 4; Masterpiece Cakeshop, see December 5, 2017)

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May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

Toledo Auto-Lite strike, day 5

May 29, 1934 (Tuesday): tensions worsened again. The Toledo Central Labor Council continued to plan for a general strike. By now, 68 of the 103 unions had voted to support a general strike, and the council was seeking a vote of all its member unions on Thursday, May 31. Auto-Lite executives, too, were busy. Miniger met with Governor George White and demanded that White re-open the plant using the National Guard. White refused, but quietly began drawing up contingency plans to declare martial law. Negotiations remained deadlocked, and Taft began communicating with United States Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins to seek federal support (including personal intervention by Roosevelt). (see May 31)

Walt Disney animator strike

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 1941: animators working for Walt Disney begin what was to become a successful 5-week strike for recognition of their union, the Screen Cartoonists’ Guild. The animated feature Dumbo was being created at the time and, according to Wikipedia, a number of strikers are caricatured in the feature as clowns who go to “hit the big boss for a raise” [2015 Hollywood Reporter article] (see June 20)

17 year boycott ends

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 1996: the United Farm Workers of America reached an agreement with Bruce Church Inc. on a contract for 450 lettuce harvesters, ending a 17-year-long boycott. The pact raised wages, provided company-paid health benefits to workers and their families, created a seniority system to deal with seasonal layoffs and recalls, and established a pesticide monitoring system. (LH, see Aug 29; UFW, see August 18, 2000)

Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 2007:  the US Supreme Court decided that employers cannot be sued under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 over race or gender pay discrimination if the claims are based on decisions made by the employer 180 days ago or more. The plaintiff, Lily Ledbetter, was a former employee of Goodyear who alleged that she was paid 15–40% less than her male counterparts, which was later found to be accurate. [Oyez article] (see Sept 24)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Cold War

HUAC

May 29, 1947: the House Un-American Activities Committee opened public hearings into communist influence in Hollywood. (see July 26)

Hollywood 10

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 1950: the Supreme Court denied new hearings for the Hollywood Ten. [jrank dot org article] (RS, see June; HT, see June 29)

Cuba

May 29, 2015: Secretary of State John F. Kerry rescinded Cuba’s designation as a terrorism sponsor at the end of a 45-day congressional notification period that began on April 14, when President Obama announced his intention to remove Cuba from the list.

The move “reflects our assessment that Cuba meets the statutory criteria for rescission,” Jeff Rathke, the State Department spokesman, said in a statement. “While the United States has significant concerns and disagreements with a wide range of Cuba’s policies and actions, these fall outside the criteria relevant to the rescission of a State Sponsor of Terrorism designation.” [NYT article]  (CW, see July 1; Cuba, see July 1)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29 Music et al

White Christmas in May

May 29, 1942: Bing Crosby recorded the Irving Berlin song ‘White Christmas’. Crosby recorded the song with the John Scott Trotter Orchestra and the Ken Darby Singers in just 18 minutes. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the version sung by Bing Crosby is the best-selling single of all time, with estimated sales in excess of 50 million copies worldwide. (see February 16, 1948)

Ricky Nelson

May 29 – June 4, 1961, “Travelin’ Man” by Ricky Nelson #1 Billboard Hot 100.

Beach Boys

May 29 – June 11, 1965 – “Help Me Ronda” by Beach Boys #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. (see February 17, 1966)

Crosby, Stills, & Nash

May 29, 1969: Crosby, Stills, & Nash released first album.  (David Crosby age 28; Stephen Stills age 24; Graham Nash, age 27).”(see “in August”)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

May 29, 1965: nine men and three women picketed the White House to protest what they called Government discrimination against homosexuals. (see February 19, 1966)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Judicial Milestone

Afroyim v. Rusk

May 29, 1967:  the US States Supreme Court ruled that US citizens may not be deprived of their citizenship involuntarily. The U.S. government had attempted to revoke the citizenship of Beys Afroyim, a man born in Poland, because he had cast a vote in an Israeli election after becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen. The Supreme Court decided that Afroyim’s right to retain his citizenship was guaranteed by the Citizenship Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. In so doing, the Court overruled one of its own precedents, Perez v. Brownell (1958), in which it had upheld loss of citizenship under similar circumstances less than a decade earlier. [Oyez article] (see Dec 18)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Reitman v. Mulkey

May 29, 1967: in a 5-4 decision the U.S. Supreme Court concluded that a California state constitutional amendment allowing racial discrimination by property owners violated the 14th Amendment. [ACLU article] (see June 2)

137 SHOTS

May 29, 2015: while acknowledging that he cannot appeal an acquittal, prosecutor Timothy J. McGinty of Cuyahoga County said that Judge John O’Donnell made serious errors before finding officer Michael Brelo not guilty in the deaths of Malissa Williams and Timothy Russell, and he wants an appeals court to order the judge to correct the record.

McGinty said that Judge O’Donnell’s reasoning in the voluntary-manslaughter trial of Officer Michael Brelo could set a legal precedent that would “endanger the public,” and that that Officer Brelo’s acquittal was based on the judge’s mistaken analysis of laws concerning police use of deadly force and on homicide involving more than one person who fired shots. He said the judge had also considered the wrong lesser charge — felonious assault — when he should have considered attempted voluntary manslaughter or aggravated assault.

“As it stands, the trial court’s verdict will endanger the public, allow for one of multiple actors to escape culpability and lead to more unnecessary deaths by police-created crossfire situations,” Mr. McGinty said in his filing with the appeals court. “This court must return the case with the corrections of law to the trial court with instructions to deliberate and reach a verdict with the correct application of the law and correct determination of lesser offense of voluntary manslaughter — attempted voluntary manslaughter or aggravated assault,” he said. (see 137 for expanded story)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Consumer Protection

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 1968: the (TILA) Truth In Lending Act passed into law with regulations designed to protect consumers in credit transactions requiring clear disclosure of key terms of the lending arrangement and all costs. It is part of the “Consumer Credit Protection Act”. [US DoT article] (see April 23, 1970)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

Hamburger Hill

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 1969: U.S. troops abandoned Ap Bia Mountain [“Hamburger Hill”]. A spokesman for the 101st Airborne Division said that the U.S. troops “have completed their search of the mountain and are now continuing their reconnaissance-in-force mission throughout the A Shau Valley.”

Outrage over what appeared to be a senseless loss of American lives was exacerbated by pictures published in Life magazine of 241 U.S. soldiers killed during the week of the battle. Gen. Creighton Abrams, commander of U.S. Military Assistance Command Vietnam, was ordered to avoid such battles. Because of Hamburger Hill, and other battles like it, U.S. emphasis was placed on “Vietnamization”–turning the war over to the South Vietnamese forces rather than engage in direct combat operations. [US Army article]

DRAFT CARD BURNING

May 29, 1969: in NY, a Federal grand jury indicted eighteen men on draft-evasion charges. A 19th was charged with illegally wearing a military uniform during a draft card-burning demonstration. (Draft Card Burning, see June 4; Vietnam, see June 1)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Fourth Amendment

Schneckloth v. Bustamonte

May 29, 1973: the US Supreme Court ruled that in a case involving a consent search, while knowledge of a right to refuse consent is a factor to be taken into account, the state does not need to prove that the one who is giving permission to search knows that he has a right to withhold his consent under the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. [Oyez article] (see June 20,1979)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Irish Troubles

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 1981:  the names of four prisoners on hunger strike together with five other Republican prisoners, were put forward as candidates in the forthcoming general election in the Republic of Ireland. (see Troubles for expanded story)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

ADA

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

May 29, 2001: the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that disabled golfer Casey Martin could use a cart to ride in tournaments. [NYT article] (see May 2, 2002)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

TERRORISM

May 29, 2001: four followers of Osama bin Laden were convicted in New York of a global conspiracy to murder Americans, including the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa that killed 224 people. (All were sentenced to life in prison.) (see Sept 11)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Iraq War II

May 29, 2003:  50 days after the fall of Baghdad, President Bush proclaimed a fresh victory for his administration in Iraq: Two small trailers captured by U.S. and Kurdish troops had turned out to be long-sought mobile “biological laboratories.” He declared, “We have found the weapons of mass destruction.” The claim, repeated by top administration officials for months afterward, was hailed at the time as a vindication of the decision to go to war. But even as Bush spoke, U.S. intelligence officials possessed evidence that it was not true. (see Sept 17)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Kandahar massacre

May 29, 2013: it was announced Robert Bales would plead guilty (thereby avoiding the death penalty) and describe the events of March 11, 2012 (see June 5)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Women’s Health

May 29, 2015: the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld U.S. District Judge Lynn Winmill’s earlier decision that Idaho’s “pain-capable abortion” ban was unconstitutional. In a unanimous decision, a three-judge panel of the appeals court held that banning abortions from 20 weeks on was “facially unconstitutional because it categorically bans some abortions before viability.” The court also found other portions of Idaho’s restrictive anti-abortion laws unconstitutional. [Spokesman-Review article] (see June 9)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism

STAND YOUR GROUND LAW

May 29, 2015: Michael Lafay, the lawyer for Matthew Apperson, a 36-year-old Winter Springs man accused of firing into George Zimmerman’s pickup on May 11 as they two traveled in separate vehicles down West Lake Mary Boulevard (Sanford, FL), announced that Zimmerman would use a “stand your ground” defense in an attempt to clear himself. (see November 28, 2016)

May 29 Peace Love Art Activism
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