Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield

Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield

Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield

Trumpet/flugelhorn
Blood Sweat and Tears
February 5, 1943
Happy birthday
Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield
Early Press Photo From Left To Right: Steve Katz, Dick Halligan, David Clayton-Thomas, Fred Lipsius, Bobby Colomby Jerry Hyman, Chuck Winfield, Jim Fielder, & Lew Soloff. (photo from: http://www.rdrop.com/users/rickert/bst-pg2.html)

 

Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield

Dear Chuck Winfield,

You were born on February 5, 1943 in Monessen, PA.

You played trumpet and flugelhorn for Blood, Sweat and Tears and were with them at the Woodstock Music and Art Fair.

Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield

Jazz professor

You taught music at the University of Maine, Augusta and may live in Maine. Your students liked you. One said in 2005:

Chuck is the****!!! Plus he likes my guitar playing, which helps…This guy has played on hit records, played at (the real)Woodstock, a master of trumpet….and STILL has enough time to be one of the nicest men you’ll meet…(wife is cute too)…A+ from me!

Another Said

Another said of the course you taught:

It was pretty decent. Great man. I found the class pretty boring, though I’m not really into music. Don’t ever ask him about his past as one of the members of Blood Sweat and Tears (it seemed as if he got upset at a student for asking about it).

And a third said:

Chuck is smart and has a great sense of humor, makes the class more interesting than it already is!!!

And in 2008 in response to a post on a trumpet board asking about your whereabouts, someone posted:

Being from Maine as a kid I hung a bit with Chuck. He really likes living in Maine and relaxing in the area. I’m not sure how much performing he’s doing but I do see him occasionally (every few years). That reminds me I need to drop him … a note.

But even with the infinite internet, I cannot find anything else about your current status.

Does anyone know?

Here is a picture of Blood Sweat and Tears horn section. You are the second from the right.

Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield
The Blood, Sweat and Tears horn section: Fred Lipsius, Dave Bargeron, Chuck Winfield and Lew Soloff

 

Reference >>> zoominfo dot com

Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield

10 thoughts on “Blood Sweat Tears Chuck Winfield”

  1. Went to grade school & graduated from Monessen High School with Sonny. He was always such a sweet down-to-earth guy. Married another beautiful classmate – also a sweet down-to-earth woman.

    Unfortunately he has never come to our class reunions even tho I sent him a personal invitation. No, I told him – you don’t have to talk about your years with BST – just would love to see and talk with you.

    Christine (Mykovich) Coates – MHS 60

  2. Met him while he was living in Maine & knew his family well. He went to my congregation. Loved going to their house & hearing him play. God has blessed him with a beautiful gift of music

  3. I think of Chuck often now, 45 years later. Every time I pick up my trumpet. He was my teacher, at UMA, in the later 70’s when I realized I wasn’t as committed as my classmates. He was so straight, so gentle. I wish I had half his integrity, half his humanity. Chuck, if you read this, thank you. I will always be grateful for having known you. Thank you for introducing me to Wrong Key Donkey, and Carla Bley. Thank you for Some Skunk Funk and the Brecker Brothers. You may be gratified that I can now play some of what you were trying to teach me. Sometimes it takes a while for the lessons to sink in. Thank you.

    1. Hey (Bill) William Sweet! Not sure if you remember me or not, but we hung together at UMA back in the day! I liked reading your words about Chuck, it sounds like we all have similar impressions and memories of what a great teacher he was and what fun we had making music under his tutelage. Hope you are well!

    1. The person that studied the bible with Chuck studied with me in 1985. He never mentioned that until many years later. Artie has many stories. Chuck and I have that in common. LOL

  4. Chuck was my trumpet teacher from high school and two years plus studying at UMA and after. That was 1979. I am still playing and using some of the lessons he taught me way back then. I am forever grateful for the musical and emotional.support as I came into adulthood and formed my life long identity as a musician and trpet player. God bless

  5. Chuck was also my trumpet teacher at UMA, from ’77 to ’80. He was the first professional trumpeter I’d ever heard live and his playing scared the crap out of me! I soon realized I didn’t know what I didn’t know, but soon needed to learn! But he was very down to earth, very humble, easy to talk with, very generous with his knowledge and time. At that time he was still happy to talk about “the band”, though he was also just as happy not to talk about it, he had moved on. His sense of humor was great, plus he took as well as he gave. His advanced ensembles were the most exciting to listen to, he led some great bands! I still use a lot of the exercises he taught me, and he made me very excited about the trumpet and about music in general. I still hold out hope to run into him again someday, to thank him for all he did, a lot of which I’m not even mentioning here, and see how he and his wife are doing. It was my absolute pleasure to know him and hang out with him.

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