Category Archives: Peace Love and Activism

August 23 Peace Love Activism

August 23 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Race Riots

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August 23, 1917: Houston Riot of 1917, or Camp Logan Riot, was a mutiny by 156 African American soldiers of the Third Battalion of the all-black Twenty-fourth United States Infantry Regiment.

Two Houston police officers stormed into the home of an African American woman, allegedly looking for someone in the neighborhood, after firing a warning shot outside. They physically assaulted her, then dragged her partially clad into the street, all in view of her five small children. The woman began screaming, demanding to know why she was being arrested, and a crowd began to gather. A soldier from the 24th stepped forward to ask what was going on. The police officers promptly beat him to the ground and arrested him as well.

Their official reports and later news reports stated the soldier was charged with interfering with the arrest of a publicly drunk female. Later that afternoon, Corporal Charles Baltimore went to the Houston police station to investigate the arrest, as well as beating of another black soldier, and also to attempt to gain the release of the soldier. An argument began which led to violence, and Corporal Baltimore was beaten, shot at, and himself arrested by the police.

That evening 156 angry soldiers, stole weapons from the camp depot and marched on the city of Houston. They were met outside the city by the police and a crowd of armed citizens, frightened by the reports of a mutiny. A virtual race riot began, which left 20 people dead - four soldiers, four policemen, and 12 civilians. Order was restored the next day, and the War Department disarmed the soldiers. The Third Battalion was sent by rail back to New Mexico. (see Dec 11)
School desegregation 
August 23, 1954: the small community of Charleston, Ark., admitted 11 African-American students into its schools, becoming the first in the former Confederacy to end segregation in its schools. Dale Bumpers served as legal counsel and went on to become governor and U.S. senator. He wrote a memoir titled, "Best Lawyer in a One-Lawyer Town." (BH, see Sept 22; SD, see May 31, 1955)

August 23 Music et al

Beatles
John & Cynthia marry
August 23, 1962: John Lennon married Cynthia Powell at the Mount Pleasant register office in Liverpool. Brian Epstein was the best man, and George Harrison and Paul McCartney were also in attendance. Absent was John's aunt Mimi, who disapproved of the union, although Cynthia's half brother and his wife were there.

As soon as the ceremony began, a pneumatic drill outside the building opposite drowned out all that was said; when the registrar asked for the groom to step forward, Harrison did, which only added to the farce.

At Epstein's expense, they celebrated afterwards at Reece's restaurant in Clayton Square, eating a set menu of soup, chicken and trifle. Reece's was where John's parents Alf and Julia had celebrated their own wedding in 1938.

John and Cynthia met in 1957 while both were students at Liverpool Art College, and began a relationship the following year.

In mid-1962 she discovered she was pregnant - the pair had never used contraception. John's reaction when she told him was: "There's only one thing for it Cyn - we'll have to get married".

Brian Epstein thought fans of The Beatles might feel alienated to know one of them was married, and so the Lennons kept the wedding a secret.

Epstein allowed John and Cynthia to live at his flat at 36 Falkner Street free of charge, where they stayed until the birth of Julian Lennon in April 1963. Thereafter they effectively moved into Mendips with John's aunt Mimi, although by that time John was spending much of his time in London with the band.

On their wedding night John played a show with The Beatles at the Riverpark Ballroom in Chester. (see Sept 11)
Second Shea concert
August 23, 1966: a little over a year after their first triumphant appearance at New York's Shea Stadium, The Beatles returned for a second time.

The concert did not sell out, with 11,000 of the 55,600 tickets still available. Nonetheless, The Beatles made more money from their appearance than they had in 1965, receiving $189,000 - 65 per cent of the gross takings of $292,000.

The lack of a sellout was unsettling and it was against this background that they said, 'Right, we definitely won't do any more. We are going to have a break and then we are going into the studio to make a record.' (George Martin from Anthology)

The support acts were The Remains, Bobby Hebb, The Cyrkle and The Ronettes. The Beatles performed 11 songs: Rock And Roll Music, She's A Woman, If I Needed Someone, Day Tripper, Baby's In Black, I Feel Fine, Yesterday, I Wanna Be Your Man, Nowhere Man, Paperback Writer and Long Tall Sally.

During the performance of Day Tripper hundreds of fans broke through barriers and attempted to reach the stage. They were held back by security guards and none managed to get close to The Beatles. (see Aug 28)
 
Cynthia sues for divorce
August 23, 1968: Cynthia Lennon sued John Lennon for divorce. Beatles Bible piece (Beatles, see Aug 28; Lennon, see Nov 8)

More August 23 Music et al

August 23, 1946: Keith Moon born.

August 23, 1967: US release of Hendrix's debut LP, "Are You Experienced?" (see Sept 16)

August 23 – September 19, 1969: “Honky Tonk Women” by the Rolling Stones #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.
 August 23 – September 19, 1969: Johnny Cash’s At San Quentin the Billboard #1 album.  
César E. Chávez, Dolores Huerta, and the United Farm Workers
August 23, 1966: Farm Workers Organizing Committee (to later become United Farm Workers of America) granted a charter by the AFL-CIO. (see March 10, 1968)
August 23 Peace Love Activism

Dissolution of the USSR

Remove term: August 23 Peace Love Activism August 23 Peace Love Activism

August 23, 1989: two million indigenous people of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, then still occupied by the Soviet Union, joined hands to demand freedom and independence, forming an uninterrupted 600 km human chain called the Baltic Way. (see Aug 23)

Sexual Abuse of Children

August 23, 2003:  while in protective custody at the maximum-security Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center in Shirley, Massachusetts, Joseph Druce strangled and stomped John Geoghan to death. Druce was Geoghan’s cell mate. Druce was a self-described white supremacist serving a sentence of life without possibility of parole for killing a man who allegedly made sexual advances toward him. He was said to have planned the murder of Geoghan for more than a month, considering him a "prize."

The press raised questions about prison officials' judgment in placing both men in the same unit for protective custody. In addition, officials had been warned by an inmate that Druce had something planned against Geoghan. (see Sept 4)

Occupy Wall Street

August 23, 2011: Chris (last name incognito) put the idea in motion: "Get a bunch of people to submit their pictures with a hand-written sign explaining how these harsh financial times have been affecting them, have them identify themselves as the '99 percent', and then write 'occupywallst.org' at the end." (see Sept 17)

Kandahar massacre

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August 23, 2013: a six-person jury sentenced Robert Bales to life in prison without parole. He was also demoted to the lowest enlisted rank, dishonorably discharged and forfeited all pay and allowances. Bales is incarcerated at United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth.

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August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Revolts

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1791: Haiti slave revolt. Former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture led a slave revolt in Haiti, West Indies. He is captured in 1802, but the revolt continues and Haitian independence is declared. Southerners are terrified by these events as they discourage the importation of slaves into the United States. (BH, see February 12, 1793; SR, see August 30, 1800)

DEATH PENALTY

August 22, 1924: the famed attorney Clarence Darrow gave a celebrated closing argument in the trial of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, on trial for the murder of Bobby Franks in Chicago. The Leopolds were two highly intellectual sons of wealthy parents who committed the murder to see if they could commit the perfect crime. Darrow’s closing argument lasted for an incredible 12 hours as he pleaded that the defendants not be sentenced to death. (He did not argue that they were innocent.) Darrow was a passionate and longtime opponent of the death penalty. At the end of his argument, the judge was in tears, and he then sentenced the two to life in prison. (see May 1, 1932)

US Labor History & Feminism

August 22, 1945: five flight attendants form the Air Line Stewardesses Association, the first labor union representing flight attendants. They were reacting to an industry in which women were forced to retire at the age of 32, remain single, and adhere to strict weight, height and appearance requirements. The association later became the Association of Flight Attendants, now a division of the Communications Workers of America.
US Labor History & Feminism
August 22, 1945: five flight attendants form the Air Line Stewardesses Association, the first labor union representing flight attendants. They were reacting to an industry in which women were forced to retire at the age of 32, remain single, and adhere to strict weight, height and appearance requirements. The association later became the Association of Flight Attendants, now a division of the Communications Workers of America.
Post-war strikes
In 1946, workers struck to win wage increases in the face of postwar inflation. The wave of strikes was the worst since 1919 and included general strikes in Hartford, Houston, Oakland, and other cities. (see Jan 16
BLACK HISTORY & Feminism
In 1946, The Women’s Political Council formed as a civic organization for African-American professional women in Montgomery, Alabama. It was inspired by the Atlanta Neighborhood Union. Many of its middle-class women were active in education; most of WPC's members were educators at Alabama State College or Montgomery's public schools. About forty women attended the first organizational meeting. Mary Fair Burks, who was head of Alabama State's English department, was the group's first president. (Feminism, see July 9, 1947)

Voting Rights

19th Amendment
August 22, 1973: after voting to ratify the 1920 amendment in 1969, South Carolina certified the 19th Amendment. (Feminism, see Sept 20, 1973; Voting Rights, see Aug 22, 1978)
District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment
August 22, 1978: Congress passed as a resolution the District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment, which proposed to give the District full representation in the United States Congress, full representation in the Electoral College system, and full participation in the process by which the U.S. Constitution is amended. (see August 22, 1986)

August 22, 1986: the deadline for the District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment passed. It required the approval of lawmakers in at least 38 of the 50 states. It was ratified by the legislatures of only 16 states (see June 30, 1995):
  • New Jersey on Sept 11, 1978
  • Michigan on December 13, 1978
  • Ohio on December 21, 1978
  • Minnesota on March 19, 1979
  • Massachusetts on Mar 19, 1979
  • Connecticut on April 11, 1979
  • Connecticut on April 11, 1979
  • Wisconsin on November 1, 1979
  • Maryland on March 19, 1980
  • Hawaii on April 17, 1980
  • Oregon on July 6, 1981
  • Maine on February 16, 1983
  • West Virginia on Feb 23, 1983
  • Rhode Island on May 13, 1983
  • Iowa on January 19, 1984
  • Louisiana on June 24, 1984
  • Delaware on June 28, 1984
US Labor History, Feminism & Nuclear/Chemical News

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1986: The Kerr-McGee Corp. agreed to pay the estate of the late Karen Silkwood $1.38 million, settling a 10-year-old nuclear contamination lawsuit. She was a union activist who died in 1974 under suspicious circumstances on her way to talk to a reporter about safety concerns at her plutonium fuel plant in Oklahoma. (LH, & Feminism, see Oct 6; Nuclear, see February 28, 1987)

Vietnam

Opposition estimation
August 22, 1962: Kennedy administration officials quoted in The New York Times estimated that there were 20,000 guerrilla troops in South Vietnam. Despite hundreds of engagements during the preceding two months and encouraging victories for South Vietnamese forces, the Viet Cong (aka, National Liberation Front) had grown in numbers, and U.S. officials felt that the war had reached a point of stalemate. (see Dec 2)
1972 Republican National Convention

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1972: the Republican National Convention in Miami Beach, Florida renominated President Nixon and Vice President Agnew for a second term. 3,000 antiwar demonstrators, many painted with death masks harassed delegates entering the Convention. The rest of the convention was marked by demonstrations outside the meeting hall; police arrested hundreds of protesters and injured many. (see Sept 17)

August 22 Music et al

Beatles
Cavern performance filmed
August 22, 1962: Granada Television filmed The Beatles during a lunchtime gig at Liverpool's Cavern Club for the show "Know The North". It would be their very first filmed performance. However, it was not aired at the time. At the end of one song, fans can be heard shouting "We want Pete!" in reference to drummer Pete Best, who'd just been kicked out of the group.

see Ringo leaves for more
August 22, 1968: tensions had been building within The Beatles for some time during the recording of the White Album. On this day matters came to a head, and Ringo  left the group. Later, Ringo stated. “While we were recording the 'White' album we ended up being more of a band again, and that's what I always love. I love being in a band. Of course, I must have moments of turmoil, because I left the group for a while that summer.

                I left because I felt two things: I felt I wasn't playing great, and I also felt that the other three were really happy and I was an outsider. I went to see John, who had been living in my apartment in Montagu Square with Yoko since he moved out of Kenwood. I said, 'I'm leaving the group because I'm not playing well and I feel unloved and out of it, and you three are really close.' And John said, 'I thought it was you three!'

                So then I went over to Paul's and knocked on his door. I said the same thing: 'I'm leaving the band. I feel you three guys are really close and I'm out of it.' And Paul said, 'I thought it was you three!'

The news of Ringo's departure was kept secret. After Ringo walked out, the remaining Beatles recorded 'Back In the USSR', with Paul on drums and John playing bass. (Beatles, see August 23; Ringo, see Sept 3)
Beatles final photo session

August 22 Peace Love Activism

August 22, 1969: The Beatles met at John Lennon's Tittenhurst Park home in England for their final ever photo session. Three shots from this session (by Ethan Russell) formed the front and back covers of the Capitol compilation album Hey Jude. Yoko Ono and a pregnant Linda McCartney (she was to give birth to daughter Mary six days later) appeared in some photographs with The Beatles (see Sept 13)
Parole denial
August 22, 2012: Mark Chapman, 57, denied parole for a seventh time, Chapman has been given a parole hearing every two years since 2000 and has been turned down each time. (see February 16, 2013)
Where Did Our Love Go
August 22 – September 14, 1964: “Where Did Our Love Go” by The Supremes #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, their first of 13 #1 songs in the 1960s.
 
August 22 Peace Love Activism

Fair Housing

August 22, 1974: The Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 enacted. It amended the Housing Act of 1937 to create Section 8 housing [rent supplement] , authorized "Entitlement Communities Grants" to be awarded by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, and created the National Institute of Building Sciences. Under Section 810 of the Act the first federal Urban Homesteading program was created. (see April 20, 1976)
SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE
August 22, 2003: Alabama suspended its chief justice, Roy Moore,  for his refusal to obey a federal court order to remove his Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of his courthouse. (see Aug 28)

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August 21 Peace Love Activism

August 21 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Revolts

August 21 Peace Love Activism

August 21 - 22, 1831: inspired by the success of a Haitian revolution in 1790 that freed the island's slaves and threw off French rule, Nat Turner's rebellion was the most successful of all slave revolts. Turner, a slave preacher, inspired fellow slaves with his apocalyptic visions of white and black angels fighting in heaven. He gathered up his seven original followers and, without the organization or planning of Prosser and Vesey, launched his rebellion by entering his owner's home and killing the entire family, save for a small infant. They moved from one farm to the next, killing all slave-owning whites they found. As they progressed through Southampton county, other slaves joined in the rebellion.

The next day, Turner and his eighty followers were intercepted by the state militia. In the confrontation that followed, Turner escaped and remained free for nearly two months. In those two months though, the militia and white vigilantes instituted a reign of terror over slaves in the region. Hundreds of blacks were killed. White Virginians panicked over fears of a larger slave revolt and soon instituted more restrictive laws regulating slave life. Turner and his followers were captured on October 30 Following his discovery, capture, and arrest, Turner was interviewed in his jail cell by Thomas Ruffin Gray, a wealthy South Hampton lawyer and slave owner. The resulting extended essay, "The Confessions of Nat Turner, The Leader of the Late Insurrection in South Hampton, VA.," was used against Turner during his trial.  (see Nov 10)
Samuel Wilbert Tucker

August 21 Peace Love Activism

August 21, 1939: five African-American men recruited and trained by African-American attorney Samuel Wilbert Tucker conducted a sit-in at the then-segregated Alexandria, Va., library and were arrested after being refused library cards. (see February 29, 1940)
Vernon Dahmer

August 21 Peace Love Activism

August 21, 1998: a jury convicted Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers of ordering the Klan's 1966 killing of Vernon Dahmer in Hattiesburg, Miss. Bowers was sentenced to life in prison, where he died in 2006. (BH, see Sept 13; Dahmer, see January 8, 2016)

Pledge of Allegiance

August 21, 1952: the Supreme Council of the Knights of Columbus at its annual meeting adopted a resolution urging that the change be made universal and copies of this resolution were sent to the President, the Vice President (as Presiding Officer of the Senate) and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. (see February 1, 1953)

August 21 Music et al

see Juvenile Delinquency and Crime Commission for more
August 21, 1955: the Juvenile Delinquency and Crime Commission in Houston, Texas, claimed success on this day in its anti-rock and roll crusade. The effort involved pressuring radio stations not to play recordings with “lewd or suggestive” lyrics. All nine Houston radio stations were cooperating. Almost all of the artists on the Commission's list were black. (see Aug 26)
Out of Our Heads
August 21 – September 10, 1965: The Rolling Stones’ Out of Our Heads Billboard #1 album
 
see Bullfrog II Festival for more

August 21 Peace Love Activism

August 21, 22, and 23: Bullfrog II Festival, held on the Pelletier Farm, St Helens, Oregon.
August 21 Peace Love Activism

Native Americans

Alcatraz Takeover
August 21, 1970: the group of Indians who had occupied Alcatraz Island for nine months "exposed" their weapons--one bow and two toy pistols--and then threw the toy pistols into the waters of the San Francisco Bay. (see Nov 21)
Leonard Peltier

August 21 Peace Love Activism

August 21, 1987: the State Department said that Leonard Peltier, was a ''convicted criminal'' and criticized the Soviet Union for considering his request for political asylum.  Supporters on the Leonard Peltier Defense Committee, have said his case is a human rights issue. Dacajeweiah, a Peltier supporter, told reporters that the committee had had no indication that the United States would free him to go to the Soviet Union if asylum was granted. (Peltier, see December 31, 1991; Native Americans, see Oct 17, 1988)

Vietnam

August 21, 1971:  antiwar protesters associated with the Catholic Left raid draft offices in Buffalo, New York, and Camden, New Jersey, to confiscate and destroy draft records. (see Sept 9)

Dissolution of the USSR

INDEPENDENCE DAY
August 21, 1991:  Latvia declares its independence from the Soviet Union. (see Aug 24)

Iraq War II

August 21, 2006:  President George W Bush acknowledged Iraq had “nothing” to do with 9/11. (see Aug 29)

LGBTQ

August 21, 2009: leaders of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America voted to lift a ban that prohibited sexually active gays and lesbians from serving as ministers. (see Sept 10)

TERRORISM

August 21, 2014: Thomas Windell Smith, 24, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiring to violate housing rights. Smith was sentenced to serve five years probation including eight months of home confinement after pleading guilty last year to burning a cross in a black neighborhood in Ozark. Smith admitted that he and Steven Joshua Dinkle burned the cross at the entrance of a black community on May 8, 2009 to intimidate the residents.

Dinkle reportedly used materials from his home to build the wooden 6-foot cross and wrapped it with cloth. He and Smith transported the cross to the black neighborhood, poured fuel on it and set it on fire in view of several houses.

Dinkle, the former Exalted Cyclops of the Ozark chapter of the International Keystone Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, received a two-year prison sentence for the offense.

Dinkle's mother, Pamela Morris, was also charged with impeding the investigation. (Terrorism, see January 23, 2015; Morris, see February 6, 2015)

Immigration History

August 21, 2015: on July 24 federal judge Dolly M. Gee of Federal District Court for the Central District of California gave the Obama administration two months to change its detention practices to ensure the rapid release of children and their parents caught crossing the border illegally.

Her opinion last month found that the administration had violated the terms of a 1997 court-ordered settlement governing the treatment of unaccompanied children — minors who tried to enter illegally without a parent. The judge determined that the settlement, in a case known as Flores, covered all children in immigration detention, including those held with a parent.

After considering final arguments from both sides, federal judge Dolly M. Gee of Federal District Court for the Central District of California on this date issued an order to put her ruling into effect. She ordered the administration to release children “without unnecessary delay” to a parent or other relative in the United States and, in a significant new mandate, to release the parent as well unless that person posed a flight risk or a threat to national security. The settlement requires the release of children from secure detention within five days.

Judge Gee also prohibited the administration from holding children in secure facilities that are not licensed to care for minors. She ordered the Border Patrol to upgrade the “deplorable” conditions in its front-line stations to ensure a “safe and sanitary” environment for children. She said the new measures must be in place by Oct. 23. (see Sept 4)

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