Tag Archives: May Music et al

May 8 Music et al

May 8 Music et al

Fear of Rock

May 8 Music et al

May 8, 1954: BBC radio in the UK banned the Johnny Ray song ‘Such a Night’ after listeners complained about its ‘suggestiveness’. Ray was famous for his emotional stage act, which included beating up his piano and writhing on the floor. (see February 23, 1955 for next Fear of Rock; see Johnnie Ray Such A Night for much more)

May 8 Music et al

Don’t Look Back

May 8, 1965: while filming of what would become the documentary “Don’t Look Back”, Bob Dylan had the idea to make a short film of his song “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” featuring him standing in an alley next to London’s Savoy Hotel. Featuring nothing but Dylan surrounded by friends Allen Ginsberg and Bob Neuwirth, flipping giant cue cards with the lyrics of the song on them, the clip — one of the first “music videos” — becomes an iconic rock moment. The cards were painted by Alan Price of The Animals and Joan Baez. (see May 11)

May 8 Music et al

LSD

May 8 Music et al

May 8 – 10, 1965: the Second International Conference on the Use of LSD in Psychotherapy and Alcoholism was held at the South Oaks Hospital, Amityville, NY,. (see August 7)

May 8 Music et al

Let It Be lp

May 8 Music et al

May 8, 1970: Let It Be lp released (the album had 3,700,000 advance orders) It is the “last” Beatle lp released, but most of it was recorded in January 1969, before the recording and release of the Abbey Road album . For this reason, some critics argue that Abbey Road should be considered the group’s final album and Let It Be the penultimate. (see May 20)

  • Label: Parlophone (UK), United Artists (US)
  • Recorded: February 1968, January–February 1969, January and March–April 1970,
  • EMI and Apple studios and Twickenham Film Studios, London
  • Produced by George Martin (uncredited) and Phil Spector.
Side one       

  1. “Two of Us”
  2. “Dig a Pony”
  3. “Across the Universe”
  4. “I Me Mine” (George Harrison)
  5. “Dig It” (Lennon–McCartney–Harrison–Starkey)
  6. “Let It Be”
  7. “Maggie Mae” (trad. arr. Lennon–McCartney–Harrison–Starkey)
Side two 

  1. “I’ve Got a Feeling”
  2. “One After 909”
  3. “The Long and Winding Road”
  4. “For You Blue” (Harrison)
  5. 5.   “Get Back”
May 8 Music et al

May 7 Music et al

May 7 Music et al

Oh Dear, Miss Morse by Pearls Before Swine

May 7, 1946. Happy birthday to…

Bill Kreutzmann. Grateful Dead drummer and so much more. [Kreutzmann site]

May 7 Music et al

Roots of Rock

May 7 Music et al

May 7, 1954: Bill Haley and His Comets released “Rock Around The Clock.” Dick Clark once called the song, “The national anthem of Rock and Roll” John Lennon said, “I had no idea about doing music as a way of life until rock and roll hit me.” Interviewer asked: “Do you recall what specifically hit you?” John Lennon: “It was “Rock Around The Clock.” [Rockabilly Hall of Fame article] (see Aug 1)


May 7 Music et al

see Monday Monday for expanded story

May 7 – 27, 1966: “Monday, Monday” by the Mamas and the Papas #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.


May 7 Music et al

Pearls Before Swine

May 7 Music et al

May 7, 1967: Pearls Before Swine began recording their ‘One Nation Underground’ album. The LP included the song ‘Oh Dear, Miss Morse’, which NYC would ban stations discovered that lead singer Tom Rapp was singing F-U-C-K in Morse code. DJ Murray The K had played the record on the air and some Morse Code-savvy Boy Scouts correctly interpreted the chorus and phoned in a complaint.  [Tom Rapp obituary] (Fear, see March 23, 1969, BSA, see July 29, 1992)

May 7 Music et al

Ozzy Osbourne

May 7, 1991: a judge in Macon, Georgia dismissed a wrongful death suit against Ozzy Osbourne. A local couple failed to prove their son was inspired to attempt suicide by Ozzy’s music.

May 7 Music et al

John Lennon’s leather jacket

May 7, 1992: a leather Jacket worn by John Lennon was sold at Christies, London, England for £24,200. Lennon wore the jacket both onstage and off in the early 1960s, when the Beatles were playing clubs in their northern England hometown of Liverpool and in Hamburg, Germany. The jacket had been expected to fetch $7,000 to $11,000.(see January 19, 1994)

May 7 Music et al

May 5 Music et al

May 5 Music et al

Cultural Milestone

Carnegie Hall

May 5 Music et al

May 5, 1891: Carnegie Hall (then named Music Hall) opened in New York City. (see June 9, 1902)

May 5 Music et al

Roots of Rock

May 5, 1956:  Elvis Presley’s album “Elvis” went to #1 on the Billboard chart. It was the first Rock and Roll album to ever reach #1. It stayed there for 10 weeks and it was also the first Rock and Roll LP to sell one million copies. (see June 2)

May 5 Music et al

The Beatles

May 5 Music et al

May 5, 1960: The Quarry Men became The Silver Beetles. (see May 10)

May 5 Music et al

The Shirelles

May 5 Music et al

May 5 – 25, 1962: “Soldier Boy” by The Shirelles #1 Billboard Hot 100.  Luther Dixon and Florence Greenberg wrote the song.

May 5 Music et al

West Side Story

May 5 – June 22, 1962: soundtrack to West Side Story was the Billboard #1 album.

May 5 Music et al

Dick Rowe

May 5 Music et al

May 5, 1963: on a recommendation by George Harrison, Dick Rowe Head of A&R at Decca records (and the man who had turned down The Beatles–“Guitar groups are on their way out, Mr Epstein.” ) went to see The Rolling Stones play at Crawdaddy Club, London. The band were signed to the label within a week. (2012 Independent article) (see May 7)

May 5 Music et al

Grateful Dead

May 5 Music et al

May 5, 1965: the Warlocks  played their first show at Magoo’s Pizza Parlor in Menlo Park, California. (Poster Trip article) (see Nov 27)

May 5 Music et al

Roots of Rock

May 5 Music et al

May 5, 1986: thanks to a groundswell of public support and a $65 million commitment from city officials, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation chose Cleveland as the winning site, over locales such as New York, San Francisco, Memphis and Chicago where the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame would be built. (R & R Hall of Fame article) (see May 7, 1991)