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June Music et al

June Music et al

Ornette Coleman

June, 1960: Ornette Coleman released “Change of the Century” album.

From AllMusic: The second album by Ornette Coleman’s legendary quartet featuring Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, and Billy Higgins, Change of the Century is every bit the equal of the monumental The Shape of Jazz to Come, showcasing a group that was growing ever more confident in its revolutionary approach and the chemistry in the bandmembers’ interplay. When Coleman concentrates on melody, his main themes are catchier, and when the pieces emphasize group interaction, the improvisation is freer.

June Music et al

Ken Kesey

June Music et al

June 1961: Ken Kesey finished writing One Flew Over the Coocoo’s Nest and moved from California to his home in Oregon.

Previously at the encouragement of Vik Lovell, a Perry Lane neighbor and Stanford psychology graduate student, Ken Kesey had volunteered to take part in a CIA-financed MKULTRA project at the Menlo Park Veterans Hospital. Kesey was working there as a night aide. The project studied the effects of psychoactive drugs. Kesey wrote many detailed accounts of his experiences with these drugs, both during the study and in the years of private experimentation that followed. Kesey’s role as a medical guinea pig, as well as his stint working at the state veterans’ hospital (where he had access to the cabinet where they kept LSD), inspired him to write One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. In 1962  Congress passed new drug safety regulations and the FDA designated LSD an experimental drug and restricted research.

June Music et al

LSD

In 1962: Congress  passed new drug safety regulations and the FDA designated LSD an experimental drug and restricted research. (see Feb 1)

June Music et al

Del Shannon

June, 1963: Del Shannon released his cover of “From Me to You.” Shannon’s version entered the Billboard Hot 100 on June 29 becoming the first Lennon–McCartney composition to make the American charts. It spent four weeks on the chart and peaked at number 77. It was even more successful in Chicago where it reached 15 on the WLS “Silver Dollar Survey” (see August 3, 1963)

June Music et al

Future Woodstock Performers

June 1966: Incredible String Band (Robin Williamson, age 22 , and Mike Heron, age 22 ) released first album, The Incredible String Band. (see In July)

June Music et al

Pete Seeger

June 1966:  released Bring ‘em Home. (Vietnam, see June 4; NM, see June 27)

Ken Kesey jailed

June 1967: Ken Kesey began serving 6 months on work farm for marijuana conviction. (see July 17)

The Association

June 1967: The Association released their third album, Insight Out which contained the anti-war song, “Requiem for the Masses.” (see June 20)

Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young

June 1970: Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young released Young’s song, “Ohio” Later, Young wrote: “It’s still hard to believe I had to write this song. It’s ironic that I capitalized on the death of these American students. Probably the most important lesson ever learned at an American place of learning.” (see June 9)

June Music et al
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June 1 Music et al

June 1 Music et al

Roots of Rock

FM stereo
June 1 Music et al
The Scott 350 was the world’s first FM Stereo receiver. Manufactured in 1961.

June 1, 1961: regular FM stereo radio broadcasting with a multiplexed signal began in the U.S. In Schenectady, NY, WGFM (owned by G.E.) was first on the air, at 12:01 a.m. Eastern time. Zenith’s WEFM in Chicago, IL, followed and KMLA in Los Angeles, CA. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approval specified the starting day. Field tests for stereo FM had begun in Mar 1959 to evaluate various competing systems. (see “in July 1964”)

Jimi Hendrix

June 1, 1962: supply officer Lyndon D Williams filed a report against Hendrix for lack of interest and inability to concentrate. (see Hendrix military for expanded chronology)

June 1 Music et al

Leslie Gore

June 1 – 14, 1963,  “It’s My Party” by Leslie Gore #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. From Wikipedia: “It’s My Party” was credited to John Gluck, Wally Gold and Herb Weiner, staff writers at the Aaron Schroeder Music firm in 1962. The lyrics were actually written by Seymour Gottlieb, a freelance songwriter. He gave the lyrics to Herb Weiner, with whom he partnered in writing songs, to peddle. It was based on actual events relating to Gottlieb’s daughter Judy’s ‘Sweet 16’ party, before which she cried over the prospect of her grandparents being invited.”

June 1 Music et al

see Let’s Get Togetherfor more

June 1, 1964: The Kingston Trio released their album Back In Town. On the album was their version of “Let’s Get Together.” This version was the first to bring the song to the attention of the general public. Dino Valenti wrote the song which would later become well known when sung by the Youngbloods in 1967. (see Nov 1)

June 1 Music et al

see Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band for more

June 1, 1967, The Beatles after live performances: “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” released simultaneously in UK and US. It becomes a cultural benchmark and wins the Grammy for “Album Of The Year”, the first rock record given that award. (see June 4)

June 1 Music et al

Mrs Robinson

June 1 – June 21, 1968: “Mrs Robinson” by Simon and Garfunkel #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

From Wikipedia: “director Mike Nichols, then filming The Graduate, became fascinated with the duo’s past two efforts, listening to them nonstop before and after filming. After two weeks of this obsession, he met with Columbia Records chairman Clive Davis to ask for permission to license Simon & Garfunkel music for his film. Davis viewed it as a perfect fit and envisioned a best-selling soundtrack album. Paul Simon was not as immediately receptive, viewing movies as akin to “selling out”, but he agreed to write at least one or two new songs for the film after being impressed by Nichols’ wit and the script.”

June 1 Music et al

Give Peace a Chance

June 1, 1969:  John and Yoko record “Give Peace a Chance” during their Bed-In. The recording session was attended by dozens of journalists and various celebrities, including Timothy Leary, Rabbi Abraham Feinberg, Joseph Schwartz, Allan Rock, Rosemary Woodruff Leary, Petula Clark, Dick Gregory, Allen Ginsberg, Murray the K and Derek Taylor, many of whom are mentioned in the lyrics. Lennon played acoustic guitar and was joined by Tommy Smothers of the Smothers Brothers, also on acoustic guitar. (Beatles, see June 13; Lennon, see July 1; Vietnam, see June 5)

 
June 1 Music et al
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Aretha Franklin Respect

Aretha Franklin Respect

Billboard #1 June 3 – June 30, 1967
Aretha Franklin Respect

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts

Those of you who have visited the Museum at Bethel Woods Center for the Arts know that the Main Gallery is not a Woodstock museum–as in a museum that recalls the “greatest festival of all time.”

The Main Gallery sets up that momentous 1969 event by walking visitors through the turbulent 60s: the civil rights movement, the space race, technological innovations, the Vietnam War, Beatlemania, the counterculture, assassinations, fashion, politics, the change in family, nationalism, and the many other of that era’s hallmarks.

As guests get about halfway through, album covers appear. Of course until then the little records with big holes dominated sales. By the end of the decade, the big records with the little holes began to outsell singles.

Aretha Franklin Respect
I Never Loved A Man the Way That I Love You

Among the first half-dozen albums are displayed is Aretha Franklin’s  breakthrough Atlantic Records debut album, I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You.  It is the featured image atop this entryThe single by the same name was a hit for Franklin and Atlantic Records selected “Respect” (can anyone write that title thinking of the song without mentally singing the letters like Aretha?) as her next single.

Aretha Franklin’s career never looked back after that.

Aretha Franklin Respect

Otis Redding

Otis Redding had written the song and released it as a single in the summer of 1965. The song did well commercially and helped establish his presence on the white side of the radio waves.

He continued to sing his version of the song and included it in his amazing performance at the Monterey International Jazz and Pop Festival in 1967. It was during his introduction (listen above) that he says, “that a girl took away from me, a friend of mine, this girl she just took this song.

Aretha Franklin Respect

Muscle Shoals

Columbia Records had recognized Aretha Franklin’s potential, but had not been able to translate it.  Ahmet Ertegun and his Atlantic Records found a way. He brought her to  Muscle Shoals, Alabama and Rick Hall’s FAME Studios.

Jerry Wexler and Arif Mardin produced the record and Tom Dowd engineered it. The musicians were the famed Cornell Dupree (guitar), Willie Bridges (sax), Charles Chalmers (sax), Roger Hawkins (drummer),Tommy Cogbill (bass), Dewey ‘Spooner’ Oldham (keyboards), and King Curtis (sax). Franklin’s sisters Carolyn and Erma were the backing vocals.

That group lighted the fuse that launched Franklin. The song went from Redding’s covert plea for sex when he got home to Franklin’s proclamation of freedom, demand for R E S P E C T.

Aretha Franklin Respect

Anthem

Not only did the song establish Franklin as a star, it became an anthem of the times for civil rights and women’s liberation. As an NPR story said, ” ‘Respect’ Wasn’t A Feminist Anthem Until Aretha Franklin Made It One.”

That is why that album cover display is so appropriate for the Main Gallery.

Thank you Aretha.

Aretha Franklin Respect
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