Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

at Livingston Gymnasium indoor track of
Denison University
November 6, 7, & 8, 1969

Presented by the Denison Campus Government Association, the Racoon Creek Rock Festival was one of the smaller festivals of 1969, but a festival nonetheless.  Held indoors at the school’s Livingston Gymnasium indoor track (it was November and it was Ohio, after all).

This is one of those festivals about which not much is known. I’ve tried to contact the Denison newspaper, but received no response. I did find a school newspaper edition from just before the event. It’s humorous to me how the article’s headline described the event as featuring “Six Name Groups.”

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Raccoon v Racoon


It’s also interesting to me that the newspaper spells Raccoon with the two “c”s as it is normally spelled, but I find several spots where the second “c” is omitted. 

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

 

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Vague

The newspaper article also fails to say specifically who would play on Friday, yet one of the posters does specify.

The Who and Owen B were scheduled for Thursday. The article also notes that “The English group has produced many hit singles including “Magic Bus,” “Pinball Wizard,” and “I’m Free.”

The article then states that The Spirit (I have only seen them referred to as simply Spirit) and The Dust (ditto) would play on Saturday.  The day is a typo and should read Friday as the article continues and states that Johnny Winter, Lycidas, and The Dust would appear on Saturday (also) to complete the 3-day festival.

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Johnny “Everywhere” Winter


Winter, it is noted, “performs a variety of interpretations of black vernacular and a wide range of black instrumental approaches.”

Good to know.

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Concerns

The writer seems to be somewhat unfamiliar with the line-up, but has the same worries expressed by all who would be in the range of a 1969 festival. After mentioning that there had been outside interest in the event (“as far away as upstate New York”) they go on to say: “We’re expecting to turn people away, but we hope the Denison campus will still be one peaceful community during the festival.”

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Great price points

The Who on Thursday cost a ticket-buyer $3.50. The lesser known Spirit only $2.50, but back up a touch for Johnny Winter’s Saturday appearance to $3.00. Student could purchase all three nights for $8.00, a savings of $1.

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival

Looking for more


If anyone else (beside Jim Sacket below) has any information about the festival, I’d love to hear from you.

Raccoon Creek Rock Festival
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British Beatlemania Born

British Beatlemania Born

British Beatlemania

November 2, 1963

British Beatlemania

British Beatlemania Born

1963

When we Americans think Beatlemania we typically think of their arrival, the 3 straight Ed Sullivan Show appearances, and the resulting cultural explosion.

It is important to keep in mind that the British Boomers were a bit ahead of us. Easily so, of course, since their media were playing and reporting about The Beatles before we had a hint.

By November 2, 1963, The Beatles had finally had the break out kind of success that any struggling band always hopes will happen, but no band could have foretold the success that descended upon them.

Despite their Cavern popularity, the Beatles began 1963 as they had ended 1962: touring as an opening band for higher billed musicians. With Brian Epstein as their manager and George Martin producing their music, success found them with the release of “Please Please Me” hitting #1 on the British charts on February 22. Having said that, even on  March 3, 1963, they were still at the bottom of the bill  supporting a Helen Shapiro tour. Other acts ahead of them included The Kestrels, The Honeys, Dave Allen, Kenny Lynch and Danny Williams.

I know. Who were they? I don’t know either.

British Beatlemania Born

Slowly but surely

Also in March, they released their first album: Please Please Me.

In April, John became a father for the first time.

Quietly.

Brian Epstein realized that the group’s youthful carefree image needed single good-looking young men.

In May, “From Me To You” their second US release also charted poorly.

With continued British success, on August 3, 1963 they performed at The Cavern Club for the last time.

On September 16, 1963, “She Loves You,” their third US release, went nowhere.

British Beatlemania Born

The London Palladium

British Beatlemania Born

In October, the British youth aren’t just listening, they are screaming. Like any successful venture, being seen is a way of increasing that success and on  October 13, their appearance on Sunday Night At The London Palladium  as the top group in front of a TV audience of up to 15 million viewers lighted the very short fuse.

Brian Epstein arranged a Christmas show with the Beatles headlining. The show sells out in October.

More recording. A tour to Sweden.

On November 1, back in the UK, their third EP, The Beatles #1, is released using singles from their Please Please Me album. Side one contained I Saw Her Standing There and Misery. The second side featured Anna (Go To Him) and Chains.

British Beatlemania Born

It’s Official

That night their fourth British tour of 1963 opened at the Odeon Cinema in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

This was the group’s first series of concerts as unchallenged headliners. The Beatles topped a bill featuring five other acts: The Rhythm & Blues Quartet, The Vernons Girls, The Brook Brothers, Peter Jay & The Jaywalkers, and The Kestrels with MD Frank Berry.

The next day the Daily Mirror newspaper carried the headline: “Beatlemania! It’s happening everywhere.. even in sedate Cheltenham.

Follow this link for a 2013 Daily Beast take on the roots of Beatlemania.

British Beatlemania Born
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