Category Archives: Music of the 60s

October 3 Music et al

October 3 Music et al

Roots of Rock

October 3 Music et al

October 3, 1945: Elvis Presley made his first ever-public appearance in a talent contest at the Mississippi Alabama Dairy Show singing 'Old Shep', Elvis was 10 years old at the time and came second. (see October 5, 1948)

Howl and Other Poems

October 3, 1957: at the conclusion of the obscenity trial regarding Howl and Other Poems, Judge Clayton W. Horn ruled that the poem was not obscene. In his decision, he stated that, “I do not believe that "Howl" is without redeeming social importance. The first part of "Howl" presents a picture of a nightmare world; the second part is an indictment of those elements in modern society destructive of the best qualities of human nature; such elements are predominantly identified as materialism, conformity, and mechanization leading toward war. The third part presents a picture of an individual who is a specific representation of what the author conceives as a general condition.” [Full transcript of decision] [complete Howl] (BG, see April 2, 1958; FS, see Nov 1)

Beatles not breaking up

October 3, 1966: The Beatles' manager Brian Epstein, recently released from hospitalization, denied reports that Paul McCartney was leaving the group. There had been much press speculation during the latter part of 1966 that The Beatles were splitting up. Each of the four members had pursued outside interests after their final concert, with John Lennon filming How I Won The War in Germany and Spain, George Harrison visiting India, and McCartney and Ringo Starr busying themselves in England. Epstein also revealed that Lennon was appearing as Private Gripweed in Richard Lester's film, and that McCartney was composing the music for another movie entitled Wedlocked, or All In Good Time. (see Oct 16)

Woody Guthrie

October 3 Music et al

October 3, 1967: Woody Guthrie died of complications of Huntington's disease.  NYT obit. (see Oct 6)

Fifth Big Sur Folk Festival

October 3 Music et al

October 3, 1968: The Fifth Big Sur Folk Festival (Big Sur, see Sept 14 – 15, 1969; Festival, see Oct 26 & 27)
  • Joan Baez
  • Judy Collins
  • Mimi Fariña
  • Arlo Guthrie
  • Charles River Valley Boys

 Seventh Big Sur Folk Festival

October 3 Music et al

October 3, 1970 – The Seventh Big Sur Folk Festival (held at the Monterey County Fairgrounds) (see Sept 25, 1971)
1:00 pm Concert:
Beach Boys
John Phillips
Joan Baez
Merry Clayton and Love Ltd.Kris Kristofferson (with Chris Gantry and Vince Matthews)
John Hartford
8:00 pm Concert:
Beach Boys
John Phillips
Linda Ronstadt, with Swamp Water
Mimi Fariña & Tom Jans
Mark Spoelstra
Country Joe McDonald
Tom Ghent
Joan Baez

October 3 Music et al, October 3 Music et al, October 3 Music et al, October 3 Music et al, October 3 Music et al, 

October Music et al

October Music et al

Green Onions

In October 1962: Southern soul has its first major hit with the instrumental "Green Onions" by Booker T. & the MG's. On a broadcast of the radio program Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! on June 24, 2013, Booker T Jones was asked about the title and said, "The bass player thought it was so funky, he wanted to call it 'Funky Onions', but they thought that was too low-class, so we used 'Green Onions' instead."
 

Paul Butterfield

In October, 1965: The Paul Butterfield Blues Band album released. (Paul Butterfield age 23). The personnel are:
  • Paul Butterfield – lead vocals, harmonica
  • Mike Bloomfield – guitars
  • Elvin Bishop – guitars
  • Mark Naftalin – organ
  • Jerome Arnold – bass
  • Sam Lay – drums, lead vocals 

 

Jimi Hendrix

In October 1965: recorded a single with Curtis Knight, "How Would You Feel" backed with "Welcome Home"  (see In December 1965)
 

LSD

In October: After faking his suicide and months on the run in Mexico, Ken Kesey gets word from fellow prankster, Carolyn Adams (aka Mountain Girl), that the cops are on to him. He sneaked back into the US where he will be caught and serve his sentence. (see Oct 2)

Nina Simone

In October 1967: Nina Simone released “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free.” 

From a Joe Hagen article: The door swung open and there she was: Nina Simone, alone in her dressing room, sweat cascading down her shaved head, a wig thrown to the floor and two glittering fake eyelashes mashed unceremoniously against the mirror.(see Oct 7)
 
October Music et al

Sly and the Family Stone

In October 1967: Sly and the Family Stone released first album, “A Whole New Thing.”  (Sly Stone, 24) Personnel for the album are:
  • Sly Stone – vocals, organ, guitar, piano, celeste, harmonica, and more
  • Freddie Stone – vocals, guitar
  • Larry Graham – vocals, bass guitar
  • Cynthia Robinson – trumpet, vocal ad-libs
  • Jerry Martini – saxophone
  • Greg Errico – drums
  • Little Sister (Vet Stone, Mary McCreary, Elva Mouton) – background vocals

 

 

Mick Jagger Performance

Mick Jagger Performance

“Turner’s Murder” by Merry Clayton Singers.
I was 18 and thought I knew it all. At least all I needed to know. Ok, most of it.

Mick Jagger Performance

I was learning that there were many more cool things than the half dozen or so things that I already knew were cool. Important things like knowing how to tie a Windsor knot or to whistle using my two pointer fingers to curl the front of my tongue. Knowing several nicknames for marijuana (albeit, never using it).

When I saw Mick Jagger on the cover of the Performance soundtrack, I was confused. It was Mick, wasn't it? Why is he dressed like a woman. He was dressed like a woman, wasn't he?

Apparently there was one more thing to know was cool, yet not actually doing that thing.

Mick in the movies

Mick Jagger Performance

Performance was Mick Jagger's first movie role. It was done in 1967 and by then those fab four friends of his had already done two movies: Hard Day's Night (1964) and Help! (1965).

Jagger was not going to play a musician chased by hundreds of fans for 87 minutes or a musician chased by dozens of villains for 92 minutes. 

Jagger played a former rock star turned landlord, sort of.

Actor James Fox plays a gangster on the run and eventually hides out at the house of a Turner (Mick Jagger). There are already sexual shenanigans going on at Turners. Fox joins Turner and the three woman already there. Ménage de cinq.

Warner Brothers blinks

Mick Jagger Performance

While Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg directed the film in 1967,  Warner Brothers, the studio, decided it could not release the film. Reportedly, the wife of one Warner Brothers executive vomited while watching it.  

Warner Brothers did finally release a version of the film in 1970. A highly edited version.  

Over the years, various revised editions have been released. The last one, and most true to the original, was not released until 2007. 

At its 1970 release, Roger Ebert said, "Performance" is a bizarre, disconnected attempt to link the inhabitants of two kinds of London underworlds: pop stars and gangsters. It isn't altogether successful, largely because it tries too hard and doesn't pace itself to let its effects sink in. But it does have a kind of frantic energy"

Other reviews thought it unworthy of the word film.

Cult classic

Mick Jagger Performance

Gradually, though, it found itself far more favorable. From WikipediaIn 1995 Performance appeared at number 30 in a Time Out magazine "all-time greats" poll of critics and directors 

In the September–October 2009 issue of Film Comment, Mick Jagger's Turner was voted the best performance by a musician in a film.

In his 15-hour documentary The Story of Film: An Odyssey, Mark Cousins says: "Performance was not only the greatest seventies film about identity, if any movie in the whole Story of Film should be compulsory viewing for film makers, maybe this is it.

Performance soundtrack

I was more into music than cinema and decided to buy the soundtrack. Powerfully odd is how I would have described it then and now as well.

I again saw the name Jack Nitzsche: the name I often saw on the back of albums, but had no idea who he actually was, Other album names were familiar, too: Randy Newman; Merry Clayton, Ry Cooder, Buffy Sainte-Marie, the Last Poets, and Mick Jagger, of course.

For me, I've learned several times that a soundtrack usually needs the movie. I learned why background music is just that. 

Here are the tracks:
Side One:

  1. “Gone Dead Train” – Randy Newman
  2. “Performance”  (Merry Clayton)
  3. “Get Away”  (Ry Cooder)
  4. “Powis Square (Ry Cooder)
  5. “Rolls Royce and Acid”  (Jack Nitzsche)
  6. “Dyed, Dead, Red”  (Buffy Sainte-Marie)
  7. “Harry Flowers”  (Jack Nitzsche, Randy Newman)
 Side two:

  1. “Memo from Turner”  (Mick Jagger, Keith Richards)
  2. “Hashishin” (Buffy Sainte-Marie, Ry Cooder)
  3. “Wake Up, Niggers” (The Last Poets)
  4. “Poor White Hound Dog” (Merry Clayton)
  5. “Natural Magic” (Jack Nitzsche)
  6. “Turner’s Murder” (Merry Clayton Singers)

Mick Jagger Performance. Mick Jagger Performance. Mick Jagger Performance. Mick Jagger Performance. Mick Jagger Performance. Mick Jagger Performance. Mick Jagger Performance.