Tag Archives: Feminism

National Women’s Hall of Fame

National Women’s Hall of Fame

Formed on February 20, 1969

Happy Anniversary


It’s never too late to learn something new. Today we will start with a matching quiz. In the left column are the names of five outstanding women who are in the 2017 class of the National Women’s Hall of Fame. In the right column are brief descriptions of their specific accomplishments, but the rows do not match.


Try to match the name with the correct accomplishment? I will show the answers at the end.


 

Temple Grandid

served for over 31 years in the US Marine Corps, attaining the rank of Lieutenant General and achieving many firsts, including first woman Marine three-star general, first woman to be qualified as Command Center Crew Commander / Space Commander at US Space Command, and first woman of general/flag rank to command a major deployable tactical command 

Lorraine Hansberry

 called the “Mother of American Food,” Ms. Waters has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for over four decades, and is credited with popularizing the organic food movement.  In 1995 she founded the Edible Schoolyard Project, which advocates for a free school lunch for all children and a sustainable food curriculum in every public school.

Victoria Jackson

animal sciences innovator and champion of farm animal welfare whose masterly designs for livestock handling systems transformed the industry and are used worldwide today.

Carol A. Mutter

 first African American woman to have a show produced on Broadway, the first black playwright and the youngest American to receive, in 1959, the prestigious New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best American Play, and the first African American to win the distinguished Drama Desk 

Alice Waters

has helped create a global community of patients, advocates, and healthcare stakeholders, with significant positive impact on the treatment of autoimmune and related diseases. 

National Women’s Hall of Fame


National Women's Hall of Fame
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott

A group of men and women founded the National Women’s Hall of Fame on  February 20, 1969 in Seneca Falls, New York. where Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, two renowned leaders of the US suffragette movement, organized the first Women’s Right Convention at Seneca Falls in 1848.


National Women's Hall of Fame


National Women’s Hall of Fame

The Hall of Fame’s mission is, “Showcasing great women…Inspiring all!”


National Women's Hall of Fame
The Helen Mosher Barben Building in the Historic District of Seneca Falls, New York.


According to its site, “In 1969, the women and men of Seneca Falls created the National Women’s Hall of Fame, believing that the contributions of American women deserved a permanent home in the small village where the fight for women’s rights began. The Hall is currently housed in the Helen Mosher Barben Building, in the heart of the downtown Historic District.


The National Women’s Hall of Fame is the nation’s oldest membership organization dedicated to recognizing and celebrating the achievements of great American women. This esteemed group grows with each Induction Ceremony and as women continue to influence and shape the arts, athletics, business, education, government, humanities, philanthropy and science.”


National Women’s Hall of Fame
And the correct matches are
Temple Grandid animal sciences innovator and champion of farm animal welfare whose masterly designs for livestock handling systems transformed the industry and are used worldwide today.

Lorraine Hansberry

first African American woman to have a show produced on Broadway, the first black playwright and the youngest American to receive, in 1959, the prestigious New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best American Play, and the first African American to win the distinguished Drama Desk 

Victoria Jackson

has helped create a global community of patients, advocates, and healthcare stakeholders, with significant positive impact on the treatment of autoimmune and related diseases. 

Carol A. Mutter

 served for over 31 years in the US Marine Corps, attaining the rank of Lieutenant General and achieving many firsts, including first woman Marine three-star general, first woman to be qualified as Command Center Crew Commander / Space Commander at US Space Command, and first woman of general/flag rank to command a major deployable tactical command 

Alice Waters

 called the “Mother of American Food,” Ms. Waters has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for over four decades, and is credited with popularizing the organic food movement.  In 1995 she founded the Edible Schoolyard Project, which advocates for a free school lunch for all children and a sustainable food curriculum in every public school.

Here is an informative 2-minute introduction about the Hall by a few of the women who are members, watch the following:



National Women’s Hall of Fame

Future home

National Women's Hall of Fame


The Seneca Knitting Mill will someday be the new home of the  Hall.  Organizers hope to have the renovations far enough along by 2018 to open the first floor. (article)


National Women’s Hall of Fame
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Women’s Liberation Movement Redstockings

Women’s Liberation Movement Redstockings

Women's Liberation Movement Redstockings
from Redstockings site

When people speak of “the 60s” they are typically speaking of the individuals and groups who marked that often counter-cultural decade: Martin Luther King, Jr. JFK. The Beatles. Bob Dylan. Malcolm X. Muhammad Ali.  Vietnam War. LBJ. Nixon. Black Panthers. Peace movement. Woodstock. NOW. Stonewall.


And if one had to pick one year of the 60s that was more 60-ish than any other, 1968 would be high on the list.


The Tet Offensive in January. The publication of ” Soul on Ice” by Eldridge Cleaver in February. My Lai Massacre in March. King assassination in April. Poor People’s Campaign  in May. Robert Kennedy assassination in June. American Indian Movement  founded in July. Riots during Democratic Convention in Chicago in August. Miss America protest in September. Tommie Smith and John Carlos protest at Olympics during medal ceremony in October.  Shirley Chisholm first Black woman elected to Congress in November.  And in December, Apollo 8 completed the first manned orbit of the moon.


A pretty good representation of “those” 60s.

Women’s Liberation Movement Redstockings

Let’s go back to that Miss America protest in September. It was organized by the New York Radical Women and during the protest women threw pots, false eyelashes, mops, and other items into a trash can. Despite the lore, they did not burn bras. The protesters also successfully unfurled a large “Women’s Liberation” banner  inside the contest hall. (One wonders what President Donald Trump would have to say about either happening today?)


Women's Liberation Movement Redstockings
1968 Miss America protest in Atlantic City (photo from Redstockings)

Women’s Liberation Movement Redstockings

On January 21, 1969, Ellen Willis and Shulamith Firestone formed  the group Redstockings after the breakup of New York Radical Women. According to their site, “Redstockings” was a name taken in 1969 …to represent the union of two traditions: the “bluestocking” label disparagingly pinned on feminists of earlier centuries–and “red” for revolution.


Women's Liberation Movement Redstockings
Redstocking stamp
Women’s Liberation Movement Redstockings

The group has gone through several changes since its founding, but its mission remains the same. From the beginning of its 1969 manifesto:


After centuries of individual and preliminary political struggle, women are uniting to achieve their final liberation from male supremacy.  Redstockings is dedicated to building this unity and winning our freedom.  


I had never heard of Redstockings, which is likely my own indictment. Perhaps you have not either.


Perhaps we will now.


References: Redstockings site 


And…


Women’s Liberation Movement Redstockings
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Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed
Lucy Burns

Lucy Burns Suffragist

It was on this date, November 21, in 1913 that the courts fined Lucy Burns, suffragist, $1 for chalking the sidewalk in front of the White House (NYT article). Lucy Burns was not a familiar name to me until I dug deeper into why the 1960s were what they were.

Lucy Burns was born on July 28, 1879 to an Irish Catholic family in Brooklyn, New York. Studying in Europe, Burns became involved in the British suffragist movement.

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

London

hgIn London, on November 11, 1909, police arrested Alice Paul, a fellow American, for throwing stones through a window at the Guildhall while the Lord Mayor’s banquet was in progress. Inside the hall, Burns found Winston Churchill, waved a tiny banner in his face, and asked him, “How can you dine here while women are starving in prison?”

Four years later, in April 1913, back in the United States Alice Paul and Lucy Burns founded the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage . In 1916, Burns helped to organize the National Woman’s Party.  She advocated the cause of “votes for women,” she organized, lobbied, wrote, edited, traveled, marched, spoke, rallied and picketed.

1917 was a pivotal year in the suffragist movement. Women continued to demonstrate in front of the White House trying to get President Wilson to change his view on the right of women to vote.

On June 20, 1917, targeting the Russian envoys visiting President Wilson, Burns and Dora Lewis held a large banner in front of the White House that stated: “To the Russian envoys: We the women of America tell you that America is not a democracy. Twenty million American women are denied the right to vote. President Wilson is the chief opponent of their national enfranchisement…Tell our government it must liberate its people before it can claim free Russia as an ally.”

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Continued protest

An angry crowd destroyed the banner, but despite the crowds’ attacks, Burns arrived two days later with Katharine Morey carrying a similar banner; police arrested them for obstructing traffic.

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed
Occoqual Workhouse torture revealed

Burns wrote that going to prison for picketing would be “the last whack of a hammer…” She served more time in jail than any other suffragists in America. She was arrested in June 1917 and sentenced to 3 days; arrested in September, 1917 and sentenced to 60 days. In October 1917, declaring their status as political prisoners, Burns and 13 other suffragists, initiated a hunger strike at Occoquan Workhouse to protest the unjust treatment of Alice Paul. Her strike lasted almost three weeks.

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Force Fed

On November 21, 1917, officials began force-feeding the hunger strikers. Unable to pry open Burns’s mouth, officials insert glass tube up her nostril, causing significant bleeding and pain.

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Responding to increasing public pressure and the likely overturning of prisoners’ convictions on appeal, on November 27 and 28, government authorities ordered unconditional release of Alice Paul, Lucy Burns, and 20 other suffrage prisoners.

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Jail for Freedom pin

And on December 6 – 9, 1917, at the Conference of National Women’s Party officers and National Advisory Council in Washington, D.C., the suffrage prisoners were each presented with a special commemorative “Jailed for Freedom” pin.

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed

Exhausted

From the Sewall Belmont site: In 1920, exhausted from constant campaigning, Lucy declared at a meeting that she would fight no more and said, “…we have done all this for women, and we have sacrificed everything we possessed for them.” She was not present when Paul unfurled the victory banner at headquarters. Burns spent the rest of her life in Brooklyn, caring for her family and working with the Catholic Church. One of the bravest and most militant members of the National Woman’s Party, Lucy Burns’ articulate speeches, supreme leadership and brilliant strategizing greatly contributed to the achievement of woman suffrage.

Today the Lucy Burns Institute continues her struggle. From that site: The Institute is named in honor of Lucy Burns, a suffragette who helped to organize the National Woman’s Party in 1916. In her work to advocate the cause of “votes for women,” she organized, lobbied, wrote, edited, traveled, marched, spoke, rallied and picketed. When she was eventually arrested for her activities, she led a hunger strike in prison and was ultimately force-fed. She knew that being able to participate in a democracy by voting was an essential way to express our human dignity. For this goal, she was willing to fight and suffer.

The clip below is a piece of a speech that Emma Watson gave at the UN in 2014. The past is prologue.
Lucy Burns Suffragist Force Fed
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