Category Archives: Music

Saturday 12 September

          September 12, 1958, BLACK HISTORY & School Desegregation: in Cooper v. Aaron, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a federal judge’s decision to postpone desegregation at a Little Rock high school until 1960 because of the threat of continued violence. Justices concluded the states were bound by the court’s decisions.

 

          September 12, 1962,  Space Race: President Kennedy gave a speech at Rice University, future home of the Manned Spacecraft Center (which later will be renamed Johnson Space Center)

          In it he uttered the famous words:      We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.

 

          September 12, 1962, BLACK HISTORY: Martin Luther King Jr. decried the pace of civil rights progress in the United States. He also said that “no President can be great, or even fit for office, if he attempts to accommodate injustice to maintain his political balance.

 

birmingham

          September 12, 1963, BLACK HISTORY & School Desegregation: white students in Birmingham, Alabama, drag an African American effigy past West End High School. Two African American girls attended the desegregated school and a majority of the white students were staying away from classes. Police stopped this car in a segregationist caravan in front of the school to caution them about fast driving and blowing auto horns in front of a school.

 

          September 12, 1965, The Beatles: an August 14 taped performance broadcast on  “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Taped before a live studio audience at Studio 50 in NY. The Beatles perform: 1) I Feel Fine 2) I’m Down 3) Act Naturally 4) Ticket to Ride 5) Yesterday 6) Help!

 

September 12, 1966, BLACK HISTORY & School Desegregation: twelve years after the United States Supreme Court’s landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling holding school segregation unconstitutional, the city of Grenada, Mississippi, continued to operate a segregated school system. In August of 1966, a federal judge ordered that African American students be permitted to enroll in the formerly whites-only schools. Approximately 450 African American students enrolled prior to the scheduled start of the school year on September 2, 1966.

          On September 2, the school district postponed the start of school by ten days. White leaders used that time to attempt to coerce African American parents into withdrawing their children from the white schools by threatening them with firing or eviction; as a result, 200 students withdrew.

          On September 12, 1966, the Grenada schools opened, and 250 African American students attempted to integrate the schools. A large white mob surrounded the school and turned away most of the African American students. As the students retreated, members of the mob pursued them through the streets, beating them with chains, pipes, and clubs. At lunchtime, the mob returned to the school to attack the few African American students who had successfully entered. As the students left for lunch, members of the mob attacked them, leaving some hospitalized with broken bones. Reporters covering the story were also beaten.

          The mob violence continued for several days, with no intervention from law enforcement. On September 16, a federal judge ordered protection for the students, and on September 17, thirteen members of the mob were arrested by the FBI.Ticket to Ride 5) Yesterday 6) Help!

 

          September 12, 1966, Teenage Culture: the made-for-TV show band, The Monkees, premiered on NBC. Episode 1: The Monkees foil a fiendish plot to assassinate princess Bettina, the Duchess of Harmonica.

 

          September 12, 1972, Feminism:  Maude, a spin-off of All in the Family, premiers, starring Beatrice Arthur as Maude Findlay, a leftist feminist who supports abortion and civil rights.

 

          September 12, 1974, BLACK HISTORY & School Desegregation: in Boston, opposition to court-ordered school busing turned violent on the opening day of classes. School buses carrying African-American children were pelted with eggs, bricks and bottles, and police in combat gear fought to control angry white protesters besieging the schools. The protests continued, and many parents, black and white, kept their children at home. In October, the National Guard was mobilized to enforce the federal desegregation order.

Friday 11 September

September 11, 1851, BLACK HISTORY: in Christiana, Pa., a group of African Americans and white abolitionists skirmished with a Maryland posse intent on capturing four fugitive slaves hidden in the town. The violence comes a year after Congress passed the second fugitive slave law, requiring the return of all escaped slaves to their owners in the South. One member of the posse, landowner Edward Gorsuch, was killed and two others wounded during the fight. In the aftermath of the so-called Christiana Riot, 37 African Americans and one white man were arrested and charged with treason under the provisions of the Fugitive Slave Law. Most were acquitted.

 

 September 11, 1961, LGBTKQED in San Francisco broadcasts The Rejected, a made-for-television documentary film about homosexuality. The Rejected was the first documentary program on homosexuality on American television. Experts interviewed for the program included Margaret Mead who spoke from an anthropological standpoint. Mead referred to the positive roles that homosexuality had played in the cultures of Ancient Greece, the South Sea Islands, and in Inuit and Native American societies. Mead noted that it was society and not the individual that determined how homosexuality and homosexual behavior were viewed.

Please note: copyright to The Rejected is held by WNET. All rights reserved. WNET is the premier public media provider of the New York metropolitan area and parent of public television stations THIRTEEN and WLIW21. The Rejected was originally produced by KQED for National Educational Television (NET) – the predecessor of WNET – and first aired on September 11th 1961, on KQED Ch.9 in the Bay Area

 

Love_Me_DoSeptember 11, 1962, The Beatles before their US appearance: the Beatles first went to EMI studios in June, 1961  (with Pete Best on drums), again on  September 4, 1962 (with Ringo on drums), finally on this date recorded their first single, “Love Me Do” with  “P.S. I Love You” on the B-side.

 

September 11, 1964, BLACK HISTORY & The Beatles: the management of the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla., had stated firmly that the stadium would be segregated. The Beatles said they would refuse to play if the stadium were segregated. The day before the concert they were assured that the show would be fully integrated.

Continue reading Friday 11 September

Mickey Hart

Mickey Hart

Mickey Hart

born September 11, 1943

Synopsis

     The opening description of Mickey Hart from his site reads that he "is a pivotal innovator, chronicler, and influencer in percussion and rhythm. Best known as a drummer in the renowned expedition into the soul and spirit of rock and roll, The Grateful Dead, the multi-Grammy award winner is also an energetic painter, accomplished writer, restless explorer, and an acclaimed expert on the history and mythology of drums. A true original armed with an inventor's audacious curiosity, Hart boldly seeks to break the rhythm code of the universe and investigate its deepest vibrations." Hart site

To the beats…

     Michael Steven Hartman was born in Brooklyn. Leah, his mother, raised Mickey. Leonard, his father, had left Leah before Mickey was born. Mickey and mom moved to Long Island (NY) soon after his birth. Later he attended Lawrence High School there,  but dropped out as a senior. He went to Europe and later joined the Air Force. 

     Hart was in the Air Force's drum and bugle corps.  After the Air Force, Hart became a session drummer in NYC. While there, he received a letter from his father inviting him to work at his music store in San Carlos, California. Mickey went and it was a good thing for him, a great thing for us.

Rhythm Devils

     Of the Grateful Dead members, Mickey first met Bill Kreutzmann who invited Hart to sit in with the band. On September 29, 1967 he did just that for the band's second set.

     Having two drummers was a rarity, but he and Kreutzmann became known as the Rhythm Devils because of their unique interplay.

     Leonard Hart became the band's money manager, but  March, 1970, he and an estimated $70,000 to $150,000 of band money disappeared. A detective eventually located him and a jury found him guilty of embezzlement.  Hart served the six month sentence. He and his son never saw each other again. Lenny Hart died of natural causes on February 2, 1975. According to Dennis McNally "Mickey went to the funeral home, cleared the room, took out the snakewood sticks that had been his inheritance, played a traditional rudimental drum piece, "The Downfall of Paris," on Lenny's coffin, and split." 

Hart leaves; returns

     Because of his father's actions, Hart left the band in February 1971 and in 1972 released Rolling Thunder. Not bitter about his father's crime, Jerry GarciaPhil Lesh, and Bob Weir all played on the album.

Mickey Hart 

     Hart returned to the Dead in October 1974 at Winterland for the band's final shows on its tour. The Dead cut back touring in 1975 doing only four shows: one each in March, June, September, and October. He did contribute to their 1975 studio album, Blues for Allah.  In 1976 Hart was again and continued to be in the band.

Mickey Hart

     Outside on his own both during and after the Dead's last show with its Jerry Garcia line-up, Hart remained and remains active. 
  • 1976, Diga Rhythm band
  • 1979, music from the movie Apocolypse Now, much of which he contributed.
  • 1989, Music to Be Born By, an album based on the heartbeat of his son in the womb,
  • 1990 his first book, Drumming at the Edge of Magic
  • 1990, At the Edge album
  • 1991, both book and disc, Planet Drum,
  • 1998 Supralingua album
  • 2000, Spirit into Sound album
  • 2007 Global Drum Project, with Hart,  Zakir Hussain, Sikiru Adepoju, and Giovanni Hidalgo. It won the Grammy award for Best Contemporary World Music Album.
  • 2012 the same group on Hart’s Mysterium Tremendum,
  • 2013, Superorganism, with long-time Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter.