Category Archives: Music et al

Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

February 20, 1944  –  March 8, 2015
Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff
Jazz trumpeter Lew Soloff ( Photo: lewsoloff.com)

Soloff was born in Brooklyn and raised in Lakewood, NJ where he began studying piano at an early age. When he was ten, he took up the trumpet, eventually attending the Julliard Preparatory School and, later, the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY.


He became one of the most respected jazz musicians of his generation.


After one year of graduate school at Julliard, Lew became involved in the New York Latin jazz and jazz scene, playing with artists like Maynard Ferguson, Joe Henderson, Tito Puente and Gil Evans.


He joined Blood, Sweat and Tears in time to be part of their second album, Blood, Sweat & Tears (he replaced Randy Brecker). The album won GRAMMYs for Album Of The Year and Best Contemporary Instrumental Performance (“Variations On A Theme By Eric Satie”).


Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff
cover of Blood, Sweat & Tears

Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

It is Lew Soloff who, at about the 2-minute mark, blasts away on Spinning Wheel and helped make it a hit. Here’s the vinyl version (with its bit of scratch and pop)



Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

Woodstock Music and Art Fair


Blood, Sweat and Tears performed early Monday morning at the Woodstock Music and Art Fair after Johnny Winter and before Crosby, Stills, Nash (and Young).


For some artists, Woodstock was a pinnacle. Blood, Sweat, and Tears did not get much traction out of Woodstock as they did not appear in the movie or on the album, but they were already Grammy successful. Soloff remained with BS & T for four more albums and remained in music playing with dozens of different bands for the rest of his life.


Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

Much more later

The Allmusic.com site synopsis states:  Soloff was closely associated with Gil Evans from 1973 on, and also played with George Gruntz’s Concert Jazz Band, the Manhattan Jazz Quintet, and Carla Bley; he was also teamed with the colorful trombonist Ray Anderson on several often-humorous recordings.


Daniel E Slotnick wrote in the New York Times, Mr. Soloff had little use for genre limitations. He was a session musician for Barbra Streisand, Frank Sinatra and Lou Reed; he was the lead trumpeter of both the Carnegie Hall Jazz Band and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra; he tackled Bach as a member of the quintet Manhattan Brass.


The man play A LOT! Here is his discography at Wikipedia or here for the AllMusic list. Your fingers will tire.


Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

Death

Lew Soloff died of a heart attack in Brooklyn on March 8, 2015. His daughter, Laura Solomon, wrote the following at her Facebook page:

Tonight I lost my dad. We flew to New York to spend the week with him and my sister, enjoyed the day together, had dinner at our favorite grub spot. On the way home, he suffered a massive heart attack and collapsed into my arms on the sidewalk in front of my husband and children. I performed CPR with the help of a passerby and continued to assist after EMTs arrived. He died at the scene, was resuscitated, made it through an angioplasty but couldn’t stabilize afterward and passed away just before 1:00 AM.


My dad was amazing. He could drive me fucking crazy, but that didn’t make him any less essential to my life. He loved his grandkids. He loved my sister and me. He was one of the greatest trumpet players in the world and I’m so proud to be his daughter. I’m so happy to carry on a fraction of his musicality in the now rare moments that I pick up my violin.


Dad had more friends than anyone I know. He was always on the phone. Always. Even when it was totally inappropriate. He was so loved by so many. His life overflowed with people who cared for him. I am so thankful for you all.


I am devastated. I can’t picture my life or my kids’ lives without him in it. It doesn’t seem real. It’s definitely not fair. But I am so grateful to have spent my dad’s last day on Earth together in New York City.


Please keep my family in your thoughts and respect our privacy during this awful time. We’re hurting badly.


Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff

Lew Soloff


Lew Soloff performs the Hoagy Carmichael classic, “Georgia on my Mind” at the Velvet Note in Alpharetta, GA. Kenny Banks on piano, Che Marshall on drums and Kevin Smith on bass. Photographed and edited by Richard Angle.



Reference >>> UK Telegraph obit

Blood Sweat Tears Lew Soloff
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Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson

Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson


We stood in record stores and flipped through albums starting at A and hoped we had the time to get to Z. Homework be damned. Dentist be damned. World be damned. So much to look at. So many wishes to make.


Sometimes we flipped over the album to read the back. Some covers we stared and searched.


Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson

Whipped Cream and Other Delights we stared. Maybe we’d missed something the last time.


On February 19, 1966  Herb Albert’s Whipped Cream and Other Delights became the Billboard #1 album. The record spent 141 weeks on Billboard’s Top 40 albums chart and its cover an eternity in the minds of those then adolescent boys.


In  2006 a New Yorker magazine article explained the cover’s impact saying that it “fogged the minds of many young men, as they gazed at the… personalized come-hitherhood to the woman staring back … the inner portion of a bare breast protrudes from the foam. She is licking cream from the index finger of her right hand… in the virtually pornless atmosphere of the suburban mid-sixties it was … the pinnacle of allure.”


Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson

Dolores Erickson


Who was this visage?  Model Dolores Erickson . And we didn’t know it then, but the picture was taken when Erickson was three months pregnant. During concerts, Herb Alpert would tell the audience, “Sorry, we can’t play the cover for you!”


Spoiler alert: it is not whipped cream, but shaving cream. Whipped cream just wouldn’t have worked under the lights needed for the shot, although it is apparently actual whipped cream on Erickson’s head.


And underneath? Erickson said in an interview, “I was wearing a bikini, and there was a cotton cloth that went around my body.”


The outtakes for the album were given to Erickson in 1965 and she still has them. She was shocked at how much it revealed, but by today’s standards they are rather modest.


Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson
outtake
Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson
outtake
Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson

Because Erickson rarely walked around partially nude covered in shaving cream, the cover did not make her everyday life famous She later  retired from modeling and went on to become an artist.


She sometimes appears at record and collectibles shows.


Herb Albert Whipped Cream Dolores Erikson
Dolores Erickson (photo from the Seattle Times)

 

Peter Whorf, who designed the album cover, passed away at the age of 64 on November 11, 1995 in Los Angeles, CA.


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Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again


February 16, 1964


A week ago I noted the anniversary of the Beatles on Ed Sullivan Show, the first time that the Beatles appeared live on American television. One week later, they appeared on Ed Sullivan again. Again live, but this time in Miami at the Deauville Hotel where they were staying.


The Beatles had endured a snow storm after their first Sullivan appearance and had to take a train to Washington, DC for their first American concert (The Beatles Meet Washington) on February 11. They flew back to NYC the next day to appear at Carnegie Hall.



Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again
Beatles at Carnegie Hall Feb. 12, 1964. (AP Photo)

The next day, they flew down to Miami. After the miserable weather of New York and Washington, Florida’s weather was a welcome respite.


Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again

From the Beatles Bible siteOne week after their record-breaking debut on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Beatles made their second live appearance.


A rehearsal took place at 2 pm, which was filmed but not broadcast.


The performance took place at The Beatles’ Miami hotel, the Deauville, from 8pm-9pm, in front of an audience of 2,600. CBS had given out 3,500, and police had to calm angry ticket holders who were denied entry.

Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again

There were some tech hiccups at the start. Paul’s mic isn’t turned up enough and John’s was set too low, but all recover and the Beatles, who’ve likely had to deal with far more serious issues, completed the three songs.


Remarkably, given the ratings success of their appearance on 9 February, The Beatles did not top the bill this time; Mitzi Gaynor was the headliner. Also on the bill was Myron Cohen, and boxers Joe Louis and Sonny Listen were both in the audience at the Deauville.


Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again

The Beatles performed six songs: She Loves You, This Boy, All My Loving, I Saw Her Standing There, From Me To You and I Want To Hold Your Hand.


The show was watched by an estimated 70 million people in 22,445,000 homes, and was repeated on 20 September 1964 at 8 pm. After filming the hotel’s owner, Maurice Lansberg, gave a party for the performers and crew who worked on the show; the food included lobster, beef, chicken and fish.


Ed Sullivan Meets Beatles Again

 

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

Ed Sullivan Meets the Beatles Again

 

 

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