Tag Archives: July Music et al

July 17 Music et al

July 17 Music et al

Herb Albert

June 17 – 23, 1967: Herb Albert’s Sounds Like… is the Billboard #1 album.

July 17 Music et al

John Coltrane

July 17, 1967, Jazz saxophonist and composer John Coltrane died at age 40.

July 17 Music et al

Joint Show

July 17 Music et al

July 17, 1967: the Joint Show opened in the Moore Gallery in San Francisco. It was the first art show to celebrate Psychedelic rock concert poster artists and their work. The show showcased the “BIG FIVE” rock artists of the times: Rick Griffin, Alton Kelley, Victor Moscoso, Stanley Mouse, and Wes Wilson. Each of the five artists created a poster exclusively for the show, which was also made available for purchase. The show helped to create an acceptance of rock concert poster art in the larger art world and the museum community, and led to more gallery shows and the inclusion of these types of works into museum collections. (Exhibition opening photos from AAA dot SI dot EDU) (see Sept 23)

July 17 Music et al

Jimi Hendrix

July 17, 1967: one of the oddest musical pairings ended when Jimi Hendrix dropped out as the opening act for The Monkees. Mike Jeffery, Hendrix’s manager had made the booking. Jeffery was seeking greater public exposure for a young client who was a budding star in the UK, but a near-unknown in his native United States.

It was in the UK, in fact, that Monkee Mike Nesmith first heard a tape of Hendrix playing while at a dinner party with John Lennon, Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton. Nesmith and his fellow Monkees Peter Tork and Mickey Dolenz became instant Hendrix fans, and after witnessing his legendary performance at the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967, they encouraged their own manager to invite the little-known but highly respected Jimi Hendrix Experience to join their upcoming U.S. tour. (see Hendrix/Monkees for expanded story; next Hendrix, see Aug 23)

July 17 Music et al
Yellow Submarine

July 17 Music et al

July 17, 1968: The Beatles movie, Yellow Submarine, released in the UK (Roger Ebert review 1968)(see Aug 8)

July 17 Music et al

Road to Bethel

July 17, 1969: although initially expressing disinterest in renting land for the festival, Max Yasgur agreed to meet with Woodstock Ventures after hearing that it is the group just kicked out of Wallkill. (see Chronology for expanded story)

July 17 Music et al
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July 10 Music et al

July 10 Music et al

LSD

July 10, 1960: Sidney Cohen’s survey of 5,000 individuals who had taken LSD 25,000 times concludes it is safe. (see June 1961)

July 10 Music et al

Bobby Lewis

July 10 – August 27, 1961: “Tossin’ and Turnin’” by Bobby Lewis #1 Billboard Hot 100.

July 10 Music et al

A Hard Day’s Night

July 10 Music et al

July 10, 1964: recorded 29 Jan, 25 – 27 Feb, 1 Mar and 1 – 4 June 1964 at EMI Studios, London and Pathé Marconi Studios, Paris, Parlophone released A Hard Day’s Night, the Beatles’ third studio album. Side one contained songs from the soundtrack to their film A Hard Day’s Night. United Artists Records had released the American version  two weeks earlier on 26 June 1964 with a different track listing. This was the first Beatles album recorded entirely on four-track tape, allowing for good stereo mixes.

In contrast to their first two albums, John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote all 13 tracks, showcasing the development of the band’s songwriting talents. (see July 12)

July 10 Music et al

see Rolling Stones for more

July 10 – August 6, 1965: “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction by the Rolling Stones #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, the first of five #1 Billboard Hot 100 songs in the 1960s.

July 10 Music et al

Beatles VI

July 10 Music et al

July 10 – August 20, 1965: Beatles VI  is the Billboard #1 album. (see July 29)

July 10 Music et al

Third Big Sur Folk Festival

July 10 Music et al

July 10, 1966: The Third Big Sur Folk Festival. (see June 28 – 29, 1967)

Featuring:

  • Joan Baez
  • Judy Collins
  • Mark Spoelstra
  • Malvina Reynolds
  • Nancy Carlen
  • Al Kooper
  • Mimi Fariña
  • Panel Discussion with Ralph Gleason: “What’s Happening Baby
July 10 Music et al

The [bumpy] Road to Bethel: July 10, 1969

  • Peter Goodrich and John Roberts meet in Peter Marshall’s office with Charles Baxter, Jeffrey Joerger, and Lee Howard of Food for Love to discuss providing food at the festival. Because of the lack of any other companies offering their services and the late date, Roberts approved Food for Love’s application. (see July 10)
  • the entire production staff met to go over all progress that had been made since they began. Most were pleased with the many tasks accomplished and plans in place. (see Chronology for expanded story)
July 10 Music et al

Grateful Dead

July 10, 1986: Jerry Garcia went into a five day diabetic coma, resulting in the band withdrawing from their current tour. (LA Times article) (see July 29, 1987)

July 10 Music et al
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July 9 Music et al

July 9 Music et al

Roots of Rock

July 9, 1955:  “Rock Around the Clock” became the first rock and roll recording to hit the top of Billboard’s Pop charts, a feat it repeated on charts around the world. (see Aug 21)

July 9 Music et al

Dick Clark

July 9 Music et al

July 9, 1956: Dick Clark took over as the host of Philadelphia’s TV dance show on WFIL, called Bandstand. He got the job after the former host Bob Horn was arrested for DUI. The show would go national on ABC the following year, with the name changed to American Bandstand. (see Sept 9)

July 9 Music et al

Bob Dylan

July 9, 1962: Dylan recorded “Blowin’ In the Wind” A few weeks earlier when he performed it live he stated, “This here ain’t no protest song or anything like that, ’cause I don’t write no protest songs” while onstage at Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village, talking about a song he claims to have written in just 10 minutes. (see July 30)

Cultural Milestone

July 9 Music et al

July 9, 1962: the first one-man exhibition for artist Andy Warhol opens at Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles, consisting of 32 silk-screened portraits of Campbell’s soup cans. (see March 5, 1963)

The Beatles

see Paperback Writer for more

July 9 – 15, 1966: “Paperback Writer” #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. From Rolling Stone magazine: In the annals of Beatles singles, we have what we might think of as a game-starter in “Please Please Me,” a game-ender in something like “Let It Be,” and a host of game-changers, the most important of which is rarely discussed as one of the band’s top efforts.

And yet, “Paperback Writer” – “just a little bluesy song,” according to its modest/understating author, Paul McCartney – which was cut 50 years ago in mid-April 1966, and released May 30th of that year, is perhaps the single that best suggests how the Beatles were about to change things up in their most radical way yet.

July 9 Music et al
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