Tuesday 13 October

Julius and Ethel RosenbergOctober 13, 1952:  the US Supreme Court announced that it had declined to grant certiorari (a writ or order by which a higher court reviews a decision of a lower court) in the appeal of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, condemned to death for conspiracy to commit atomic espionage for the Soviet Union.

 

beatles london palladiumOctober 13, 1963, although The Beatles’ popularity had been growing steadily and to increasingly frantic heights throughout 1963, their appearance at the London Palladium catapulted into the attentions of the mainstream media.

Sunday Night At The London Palladium was a variety entertainment program that regularly drew huge British TV audiences of up to 15 million people. Competition to appear was fierce and The Beatles, taking no chances, had spent the previous evening rehearsing.

631013_london_palladium_ticket_01On the night they appeared briefly at the beginning of the show, before compère Bruce Forsythe told the audience, “If you want to see them again they’ll be back in 42 minutes.” And indeed they were. The Beatles topped the bill that night, closing the hour-long show. They began with From Me To You, followed by I’ll Get You, which was introduced by Paul McCartney with some jovial interjections from John Lennon. Their most recent hit, She Loves You, was next, announced collectively by Lennon, McCartney and George Harrison. Then came the finale. Paul McCartney attempted to announce it, but was drowned out by the screams from the frenzied audience. Lennon told them to “shut up”, a gesture which was applauded by the older members in the audience. McCartney then asked them all to clap and stamp their feet, and they began Twist And Shout.

The Beatles’ appearance featured on the ITN news, complete with footage from the group’s dressing room. The following day, meanwhile, newspaper reporters wrote front-page stories about the screaming fans.

 

 

 

draft card burning signOctober 13, 1966: the conviction of David J Miller, the first person arrested in the country for burning his draft card was upheld by the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. The court held that Congress had the right to enact a law against destroying a draft card so long as it did not infringe on a constitutional right.

 

mcnamara_650.1October 13, 1966, Vietnam: Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara declared at a news conference in Saigon that he found that military operations have “progressed very satisfactorily since 1965.” (click → NYT article)

 

October 13, 1967, Feminism: Executive Order 11375 expanded President Lyndon Johnson's affirmative action policy of 1965 to cover discrimination based on gender. As a result, federal agencies and contractors must take active measures to ensure that women as well as minorities enjoy the same educational and employment opportunities as white males. (click → NYT article)

 

October 13, 2010, LGBT: US Federal Judge Virginia Phillips declared Don’t ask, don’t Tell unconstitutional and temporarily ends the policy. The US Department of Justice immediately appealed the ruling as is required when a federal judge rules on a national law. On October 19, a US Federal Judge struck down the appeal of Don’t ask, don’t Tell by the Department of Justice. The US Military begins accepting applications for gay service members. Don’t ask, Don’t Tell temporarily ends. (click → NYT article)

 

seattle mayorOctober 13, 2014, Native Americans: Seattle’s Mayor Ed Murray signed a proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day and by so doing the city of Seattle no longer celebrated the “Columbus Day” holiday.

October 12

October 12

October 12October 12, 1892, Pledge of Allegiance: during Columbus Day observances organized to coincide with the opening of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, the pledge of allegiance was recited for the first time. Francis Bellamy, a Christian Socialist, had initiated the movement for such a statement and having flags in all classrooms. His pledge was: I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

October 12

October 12 – November 15, 1963,  “Sugar Shack” by Jimmy Gilmer & the Fireballs #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

October 12

October 12, 1964,  Space Race: Soviets V. M. Komarov, K. P. Feoktistov and B. B. Yegorov all flew on Voskhod 1, the first mission to send multiple men into space.

October 12

October 12 – 16, 1964: Robert A. Moog and Herbert A. Deutsch introduce and demonstrate their music synthesizer at the convention of the Audio Engineering Society in NYC.
October 12October 12 – November 15, 1968: Big Brother and the Holding Company’s Cheap Thrills is the Billboard #1 album.

One of the greatest first 10 seconds of any song ever.

October 12, 1970: President Nixon announced the pullout of 40,000 more American troops in Vietnam by Christmas. click → NYT article
October 12,1972: en route to the Gulf of Tonkin, a racial riot involving more than 200 sailors breaks out aboard the United States Navy aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk; 40 persons were injured and 28 sailors arrested, all but one black. In February 1973, Airman William E Boon, the only white crewman charged in connection with racial violence, was found not guilty of assault. Fifteen black crewmen were tried. Nine were convicted.  
NYT article a month later → USS Kitty Hawk
October 12October 12, 1984: The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 was enacted. It was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan. Among its constituent parts and provisions was the Armed Career Criminal Act. The ACCA provided sentence enhancements for felons who committed crimes with firearms, if convicted of certain crimes three or more times.  If a felon had been convicted more than twice of a "violent felony" or a "serious" drug crime, the Act provided a minimum sentence of fifteen years, instead of the ten-year maximum prescribed under the Gun Control Act. The Act provided for a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.
October 12October 12, 2000, TERRORISM: in Aden, Yemen, the USS Cole was badly damaged by two Al-Qaeda suicide bombers, who place a small boat laden with explosives alongside the United States Navy destroyer, killing 17 crew members and wounding at least 39.
October 12, 2014, LGBT: U.S. District Judge Timothy Burgess released his 25-page decision that struck down Alaska's first-in-the-nation ban on gay marriages. Five gay couples had asked the state of Alaska to overturn a constitutional amendment approved by voters in 1998 that defined marriage as being between one man and one woman.

                The lawsuit filed in May sought to bar enforcement of Alaska's constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. It also called for barring enforcement of any state laws that refused to recognize gay marriages legally performed in other states or countries or that prevent unmarried gay couples from marrying.

                Burgess had heard arguments the previous Friday afternoon and promised a quick decision.  NYT link → Gay marriage

October 11

October 11

October 11
October 11, 1919, BLACK HISTORY and Marcus Garvey: with the goal of deporting Garvey firmly in mind, J. Edgar Hoover wrote a memo suggesting that investigators pursue the idea of prosecuting Garvey for fraud, in connection with his Black Star Line activities.

October 11

October 11

October 11, 1962, Catholic Church’s Second Vatican Council  Pope John XXIII convenes an ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church—the first in 92 years. In summoning the ecumenical council—a general meeting of the bishops of the church—the pope hoped to bring spiritual rebirth to Catholicism and cultivate greater unity with the other branches of Christianity. In calling the ecumenical council, he sought a "New Pentecost," a new outpouring of the Holy Spirit. He sought reconciliation for the world's divided Christianity and invited Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Protestant observers to attend the proceedings.  During the Council a papal commission worked on a new marriage statement. The Council would close on December 8, 1965.
October 11, 1963,  Malcolm X interview at UC Berkeley by Herman Blake. Malcolm X discussed being a Black Muslim, the conditions of Blacks in this country, their relation with white people, and stated  the case for Black separatism.

October 11October 11 – 12, 1968,  Space Race: after extensive redesign work, Apollo 7, commanded by Wally Schirra (the only astronaut to command Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions) enters earth orbit in the first test of the spacecraft. click → NYT Apollo 7
October 11, 1973: The Louisiana Ku Klux Klan said it was raising a defense fund for Byron De La Beckwith, who was charged with bringing a bomb into Louisiana.
October 11October 11, 1987, AIDS: hundreds of thousands of activists take part in the National March on Washington to demand that Presiden t Reagan address the AIDS crisis. Although AIDS had been reported first in 1981, it was not until the end of his presidency that Reagan spoke publicly about the epidemic. (click → NYT article)
anita hill 2October 11, 1991, Feminism: University of Oklahoma Law Professor Anita F. Hill testified before a Senate Judiciary Committee that conservative Federal Appeals Court Judge and Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her when she was employed as his personal assistant. Three days of unprecedented televised Senate Judiciary Committee hearings follow the charges. Senators Arlen Specter, Alan Simpson and Orrin Hatch accuse Hill of falsifying the events, and her credibility was questioned because her allegations did not come until nine years after the alleged acts took place. Thomas reappeared before the panel to denounce the proceedings as a "high-tech lynching."  (click → NYT article)

October 11

October 11, 2000, Environmental Issues: 250 million US gallons  of coal slurry spill in Martin County, Kentucky (considered a greater environmental disaster than the Exxon Valdez oil spill).
October 11October 11, 2005 , BLACK HISTORY: the firm of Spohrer Wilner Maxwell & Matthews, best known for its court wins against tobacco giants, promised to look into the 1964 slaying of black housekeeper Johnnie Mae Chappell by white shooters without charge.

Senior partner Robert Spohrer asked Gov. Jeb Bush and State Attorney Harry Shorstein to reopen the case, appoint a special prosecutor or impanel a grand jury to investigate the slaying.

The attorney also said his office has been in touch with the Southern Poverty Law Center and was looking into filing another lawsuit, although the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear a case last year that accused local detectives of covering up evidence to protect Chappell's killers.
October 11October 11, 2011, TERRORISM: the trial of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, accused of trying to blow up a commercial airliner with a bomb sewed into his underwear ended  just a day after it had begun, when he abruptly announced that he would plead guilty to all of the federal counts against him.

What's so funny about peace, love, and activism?