Tag Archives: May Music et al

May 20 Music et al

May 20 Music et al

Joe Cocker

Bruce Rowland
Sunday 17 August 1969. Joe Cocker and the Grease Band. (photo by J Shelley)

 

May 20, 1944: Joe Cocker born.

May 20 Music et al

Johnny Gentile and His Group

May 20 Music et al

May 20, 1960: the Silver Beetles (John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Stu Sutcliffe, and Tommy Moore) played the first night of a short tour of Scotland backing singer Johnny Gentle, at Alloa Town Hall in Clackmannanshire. They were never billed as The Silver Beetles on the tour; all posters gave the billing as “Johnny Gentle and his group”. Paul McCartney later wrote:

Now we were truly professional, we could do something we had been toying with for a long time, which was to change our names to real showbiz names. I became Paul Ramon, which I thought was suitably exotic. I remember the Scottish girls saying, ‘Is that his real name? That’s great.’ It’s French, Ramon. Ra-mon, that’s how you pronounce it. Stuart became Stuart de Staël after the painter. George became Carl Harrison after Carl Perkins (our big idol, who had written ‘Blue Suede Shoes’). John was Long John. People have since said, ‘Ah, John didn’t change his name, that was very suave.’ Let me tell you: he was Long John. There was none of that ‘he didn’t change his name’: we all changed our names.

                So here we were, suddenly with the first of Larry’s untempestuous acts and a tour of Scotland, when I should have been doing my GCE exams. A lot of my parents’ hopes were going up the spout because I was off with these naughty boys who weren’t doing GCEs at all.” (see June 11)


May 20 Music et al

Karlheinz Stockhausen

May 20, 1967: advanced copies of Sgt Pepper’s are sent to the B.B.C. radio service. It decides to ban “A Day In the Life” from broadcast because it contained drug inducement themes in the song. The song’s style was influenced by Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Gesang der Jünglinge. [Stockhausen site] (see June 1)


May 20 Music et al

“Groovin’”

May 20 – June 2, 1967: “Groovin’ ” by the Young Rascals #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.


May 20 Music et al

The Road to Bethel

May 20, 1969: Michael Lang found separate office space at 513-A Avenue of the Americas in NYC so he can be away from the other organizers. (see Road for expanded story)

May 20 Music et al

Let It Be

May 20, 1970: Let It Be movie released. [Guardian article] (see June 13)


May 20 Music et al
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May 18 Music et al

May 18 Music et al

see Jimmy Soul for more

May 18 – 30, 1963,  – “If You Wanna Be Happy” by Jimmy Soul #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

May 18 Music et al

Miami Pop Festival

May 18 Music et al

May 18 – 19, 1968 – The first Miami Pop Festival. An estimated 100,000 people attended this concert, which was promoted by Richard O’Barry & Michael Lang.

From Wikipedia: The first Miami Pop event …was originally publicized on promotional materials as the “1968 Pop and Underground Festival,” and “The 1968 Pop Festival”. An estimated 25,000 people attended this event, which was promoted by Richard O’Barry and Michael Lang, later famous as promoter of Woodstock. Bands featured at the festival included The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Mothers of Invention, Blue Cheer, Chuck Berry, John Lee Hooker and The Crazy World of Arthur Brown. The opening act on Saturday was a little-known group called The Package, and the closing act was The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Originally scheduled as a two-day event, Sunday’s concert was rained out. But there was at least one beneficial result – it inspired Hendrix to write “Rainy Day, Dream Away.”  (see May 18 – 19)

May 18 Music et al

Northern California Folk-Rock Festival

May 18 Music et al

May 18 – 19, 1968: The Northern California Folk-Rock Festival was held at Family Park in the Santa Clara County Fairgrounds in San Jose, California and promoted by Bob Blodgett. It was the first of two such festivals held at the venue, being followed by the 1969 Northern California Folk-Rock Festival.  (see Aug 3 & 4)

May 18 Music et al

Archie Bell and the Drells

May 18 – 31, 1968: “Tightin’ Up” by Archie Bell and the Drells #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

From Wikipedia: “Tighten Up” was written by Archie Bell and Billy Buttier. It was one of the first songs that Archie Bell & the Drells recorded, in a session in October 1967 at the Jones Town Studio in Houston, Texas, along with a number of songs including “She’s My Woman”. The instrumental backing for “Tighten Up” was provided by the T.S.U. Toronadoes, the group which had developed it[3] in their own live shows before they brought it to Archie Bell & the Drells at the suggestion of Skipper Lee Frazer, a Houston disk jockey who worked with both groups. At the recording session, the Drells worked late into the night with the Toronadoes as Archie Bell perfected the vocals.


May 18 Music et al

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May 17 Music et al

May 17 Music et al

Princeton “riot”

May 17 Music et al

May 17, 1955: Princeton University students played the Bill Haley hit record Rock Around the Clock simultaneously from their dorm rooms. News reports indicated that it really wasn’t a “riot,” but university administrators were apparently not happy, since four students were later suspended “indefinitely.”  Blackboard Jungle, the film that opens with the song, was banned in several cities because of its alleged immoral influence on juveniles (and, apparently, Princeton University students). It was banned in Memphis, Tennessee, on March 28, 1955, and withdrawn as the U.S. entry in the Venice Film Festival on August 28, 1955. (Today In Civil Liberties article)  (see Aug 21)

May 17 Music et al

Monterey Folk Festival

May 17 Music et al

May 17, 1963: the first Monterey Folk Festival took place over three days in Monterey, California. The festival featured Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Peter Paul and Mary. Baez, had a home in Carmel Highlands, was a huge star at the time, while Dylan was a still a newcomer making a name for himself.

Dylan was not treated kindly by that Monterey audience, who had come to see more traditional folks acts such as Peter, Paul and Mary (who ironically had a hit that summer with Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind”), the Weavers and the New Lost City Ramblers. As described in the excellent book about that era, David Hajdu’s “Positively 4th Street,” “The Monterey audience, which was largely unfamiliar with Dylan’s style, responded poorly, talking loudly over his singing.”

May 17 Music et al

“He went over very badly,” said Barbara Dane, the festival’s host, in Hajdu’s account. “He didn’t play very long, and it felt like he was on for an hour. I think people were laughing.” Even though he did three of his hardest-hitting protest songs, “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues,” “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” and “Masters of War,” the response was so bad it prompted Baez to walk out unannounced and admonish the audience. “She wanted everyone to know, she said, that this young man had something to say,” Hajdu wrote. “He was singing about important issues, and he was speaking for her and everyone who wanted a betterworld. They should listen, she said — she ordered them, nearly:Listen!” They performed Dylan’s “With God on Our Side” together, their voices an odd match, “salt pork and meringue,” but Hadju wrote, “the tension between their styles made their presence together all the more compelling.” They left the stage with “people cheering.” (see May 27)

May 17 Music et al

Herbie Hancock

May 17, 1965: Hancock released his fifth album, Maiden Voyage. It is a concept album aimed at creating an oceanic atmosphere. Stephen Thomas Erlewine in his All Music review writes: Less overtly adventurous than its predecessor, Empyrean Isles, Maiden Voyage nevertheless finds Herbie Hancock at a creative peak. In fact, it’s arguably his finest record of the ’60s, reaching a perfect balance between accessible, lyrical jazz and chance-taking hard bop.


May 17 Music et al

“Louie, Louie”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwmRQ0PBtXU

May 17, 1965: the FBI had launched a formal investigation in 1964 into the supposedly pornographic lyrics of the song “Louie, Louie.” That investigation finally neared its conclusion on this day in 1965, when the FBI Laboratory declared the lyrics of “Louie Louie” to be officially unintelligible. (TC, see January 8, 1966; FoR, see March 27, 1971)

John Lennon pleads for mercy

May 17 Music et al

May 17, 1972: deportation hearings for John Lennon Yoko Ono, closed with Lennon telling the Immigration Service inquiry officer: “I don’t know if there’s any mercy to plead for because this isn’t a Federal Court. But if there is, I’d like it, please.” (see June 12)

May 17 Music et al

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