Tag Archives: Grateful Dead

Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead

Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead

They’re BACK!

Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead

Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead

Link to 30 Days
From the Grateful Dead site:

If you've been part of the Dead.net community for the past few years, then you know we're on a mission to make a miracle every day in the month of November. This year is no different. 

As a token of our appreciation for making 2017 an epic year, we're giving away a high-quality 320Kbps MP3 download every day this month. That's 30 days of unreleased Grateful Dead tracks from the vault, selected by Dead archivist and producer David Lemieux! Intrigued? We're also going to put your knowledge to the test and give you a chance daily to win a limited-edition 7" single, the 1st release from our 2017 series. 

Here's how it works: 

You know your Ables from your Bakers from your C's, but can your finely tuned ears differentiate the cosmic "comeback" tour from a spacey 70's show? Each day we'll post a free download from one of the Dead's coveted shows. Will it be from that magical night at Madison Square Garden in '93 or from way back when they were just starting to warm it up at Winterland? Is that Pigpen's harmonica we hear? Brent on keys? Step right up and try your hand all November long. 

Guess the venue and date correctly and you'll be automatically entered to win the prize of the day. Each day a winner will be selected at random, so take your time and make your best guess! Answer correctly, and you will also be automatically entered for our Grand Prize - a copy of our SOLD OUT MAY 1977: GET SHOWN THE LIGHT boxed set. 
Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead
NOW!
Uncle John's Band kicks off the first free download of  2017. 

When and where? 

Well, if you want, you can enter the contest and guess or simply wait for the answer tomorrow. Until then, you can listen to 2017's first 8 minutes and 58 seconds of what will be, I'm sure, another great November of free Dead music courtesy of their archives. Enjoy!

Keep in mind that these are high quality live recordings and if you are only familiar with the song's studio recording, live is where it's at.  
Of course, there will be the seques like a China/Rider. 

And even if you are familiar with a live version, remember how songs evolved, left a tour's setlist for a few years, and came back renewed. 

You can' go wrong.

Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead
2016's 30 downloads yielded a total of 6 hours and 59 minutes worth of previously unreleased Dead recordings. That's right! Here's that list:
  • Dark Star > Broken Palace
  • Picasso Moon
  • Mississippi Half-Step > Franklin’s Tower
  • Victim or the Crime > Foolish Heart
  • Weather Report Suite > Stella Blue
  • The Music Never Stopped
  • Attics of My Life
  • Doin’ That Rag
  • Just  a Little Light
  • Bird Song
  • Comes a Time > Lost Sailor > St of  Circumstance
  • Friend of the Devil
  • That’s It for the Other One
  • Estimated Prophet > Uncle John’s Band
  • Scarlet Begonias > Touch of Grey > Fire on the Mt
  • Loser
  • Playing in the Band > Uncle John’s Band
  • New Speedway Boogie
  • Passenger…Brown -Eyed Women
  • Days Between
  • To Lay me Down
  • Lazy River road
  • Black-Throated Wind
  • Feel Like a Stranger
  • Shakedwon Street
  • Help > Slipknot! > Franklin’s Tower
  • Samson & Delilah
  • Cumberland Blues
  • US Blues
  • Playing in the Band
And so far (2010 - 2016) the site has given away over 38 HOURS of music. 

Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, Grateful Dead 30 Days Dead, 

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Dead at Woodstock

Dead at Woodstock

The oft' told tale of the Dead's performance at Woodstock was that it was plagued with various difficulties and was generally lackluster. That it wasn't a typical '69 performance.  It was only about 70 minutes of music with a more than 10 minute technical break after only two songs totaling five minutes. Plus, there was, as Phil Lesh retold, walkie-talkie interference with their PA during some parts. 
Dead at Woodstock
Dead at Woodstock…Jerry and Bob

Dead at Woodstock

Dead at Woodstock
Dead at Woodstock
               Well, let's take a look at the set list: 
  • 1. Saint Stephen (2:04)
  • 2. Mama Tried (2:42)
  • 3. a High Time tease (30 seconds)
  • the 10 minute technical issues break
  • 4. Dark Star (19:10)
  • 5. High Time (6:20),
  • 6. Turn On Your Lovelight (38:42)
               How atypical was the Dead at Woodstock? The concert immediately before at Family Dog at the Great Highway in San Francisco on  August 3  was about 90 minutes. Their first concert afterward was on August 20 at the Aqua Theater in Seattle.  How long was it? About 90 minutes.
               If not for the technical issues, faced by most of the Woodstock performers, the Dead at Woodstock was not too different.
               Perhaps it'd be best to give the Dead at Woodstock an actual listen and decide for yourself. As for me, I enjoy it. Of course the spice of it being at Woodstock is an enticing enhancement, but even without that, it's still good. After all, there's only one Barton Hall and that was eight years in the future.
               I dare you to click and open  ↓ It's really a nice listen for any day and a slice of history. You'll hear the actual radio feedback the Phil Lesh talks about during a quieter part of their set.
Internet Archive of Dead's performance @ Woodstock

 

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Bob Weir

Bob Weir

Happy birthday to you…

October 16, 1947

Jimmy come lately
I quickly admit that I was not much of a Dead fan until my brother-in-law George directed me to the Internet Archives site [Internet Archive Grateful Dead] with its hundreds, no, thousands of Dead recordings. I learned the letters SBD (soundboard), AUD (audience), Matrix (someone's incredible mixing of both a SBD and and AUD), and BB (a Betty Board as in Betty Cantor-Jackson, onetime soundboard tech for the Dead).

I also learned that, and this was the tipping point for this penurious person, I could download any file I wanted for free. That generosity did not last. Today, only the audience recordings are still available for free download. Many of those are simply outstanding recordings. The soundboards are available to listen to, but not to download.

Get to the point

I didn't get the Dead because I was familiar only with the Dead's studio work, which didn't do much for me. Yes their two 1970 masterpieces, Workingman Dead and American Beauty, both made my 8-track collection, but by 1971 I was married, by 1973 a father, and working two or three jobs. Concerts were rarely part of the budget.

Bob Weir

When the Dead began to play in 1965, Bob Weir was just 17. Even by the counterculture's egalitarian standards, Weir was still a kid. 

The kid had not been a good student. His behavior defined the then American education's definition of the poorly performing student: a lazy misfit. Fortunately, while in the system he met John Perry Barlow. Fortunately, Weir knew enough to get kicked out of the system and back to his hometown of San Francisco. 

And fortunately, he met Jerry Garcia, too. Hand in instrument, they morphed from Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions into the electric Warlocks, and quickly tripped from there into the Grateful Dead.

Faced with the daunting task of playing beside the genius guitar playing of Garcia, he became one of rock's best rhythm guitarists. He became the co-lead-vocalist with Garcia, and with old school friend Barlow wrote many of the Dead's best songs such as...
  • Black-Throated Wind
  • Cassidy
  • Looks Like Rain
  • Lost Sailor
  • Mexicali blues
  • The Music Never Stopped
  • Saint of Circumstance
Keeps on truckin’
Following the demise of the original Dead after Garcia's death in 1995, Weir continued to play music: sometimes with other Dead band mates, sometimes with others. 

In 2016, Weir released Blue Mountain. The Pitchfork site had this to say about it: As Weir’s sixth studio full-length outside the Grateful Dead, Blue Mountain functionally serves as a reboot for the guitarist, whose solo sensibility long ago veered far from Jerry Garcia and Robert Hunter’s cosmic Americana and into the AOR waters of 1978’s Heaven Help the Fool (made with Fleetwood Mac producer Keith Olsen), the pastel fusion of Bobby and the Midnites in the ’80s, and the dense jam-jazz of Ratdog in the ’90s. With an ambient C&W production that often subsumes lead guitar into the reverb swirl (and occasionally swallows Weir), Blue Mountain will likewise probably prove inseparable from the historical period in which it was recorded. But, unlike Weir’s previous albums, Blue Mountain also finally seems like the right album at the right time for Weir. Quietly adventurous, wise, and a welcome late-career turn, Blue Mountain builds an ethereal home for a rhythm guitarist who was tempered in the chaos-friendly environs of Dead.

Don't just read about it, though. I'm listening to it as I write this and it is sounds are smooth and soothing. 

 

 

 

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