Category Archives: Peace Love Art and Activism

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Dred Scott

September 17, 1858: Scott did not live very long to enjoy his freedom. He died of  tuberculosis less than two years after he achieved freedom. (see Dred Scott for expanded story; BH, see February 14, 1859)

Louis Armstrong

September 17, 1957: jazz musician Louis Armstrong angrily announced that he would not participate in a U.S. government-sponsored tour of the Soviet Union. Armstrong was furious over developments in Little Rock, Arkansas, where mobs of white citizens and armed National Guardsmen had recently blocked the entrance of nine African-American students into the all-white Central High School. [2007 NYT article] (BH, see Sept 25; CW, see Nov 7)

High Hopes Baptist Church

September 17, 1962: High Hopes Baptist Church near Dawson, Georgia was burned to the ground. It is the 4th “Negro Church” to be set ablaze. Three white men later admitted burning the church. They were sentenced to seven-year prison terms.. The homes of five Black families had also been burned. (see BH, see Sept 20; see Albany for expanded story; Church Burning, see Sept 25)

Weather Underground

September 17, 1971: the Weathermen launched a retaliatory attack on the New York Department of Corrections, exploding a bomb near Correctional Services Commissioner Russell G. Oswald’s office. The communique accompanying the attack called the prison system ‘how a society run by white racists maintains its control,’ with white supremacy being the ‘main question white people have to face'” and saying that the Attica riots are blamed on Gov. Nelson Rockefeller. (NYT article) (BH, see Oct 2; APR, see December 30, 1976; WU, see January 29, 1975)

George Wallace

September 17, 1998: George Wallace buried. James Hood traveled from his home in Madison, Wis., to attend the funeral in Montgomery, Alabama. [NYT obit] (BH, see February 23, 1999; U of A, see Oct 13, 2005)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Technological Milestone

September 17, 1931: RCA Victor demonstrated the first long-playing record, a 33 1/3 rpm recording, was demonstrated at the Savoy Plaza Hotel in New York. The venture was doomed to fail however due to the high price of the record players, which started around $95. [Vinyland article] (see Nov 26)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

September 17 Music et al

News Music

September 17, 1965: Time magazine launched its coverage of antiwar songs in the article, “Rock ‘n’ Roll: Message Time,” which quoted from the nineteen-year-old P. F. Sloan’s best-selling song “Eve of Destruction.”

Barry McGuire, the former lead singer for the New Christy Minstrels, recorded the song, and in late August, his record had begun to appear in the pop charts. Within a few weeks, it had reached Number 1, and then began to fade. Protest had seemingly become fashionable. Sloan would later recall,  “The media frenzy over the song tore me up and seemed to tear the country apart,”. Josh Dunson, a member of the Broadside group, interpreted the broader impact: ‘Eve of Destruction’ is the first protest song dealing in specifics to reach the non-college-educated sector of the population. It is awkward and full of holes, but the earnestness with which it was bought by hundreds of thousands and blocked by dozens of stations might indicate a large segment of the young population other than college students is dissatisfied with our war policy abroad and double standard at home. [2017 Time article] (see Sept 24)

Musical Cultural Milestone: Doors

September 17, 1967: The Doors appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show and performed “Light My Fire”. Sullivan had requested that the line “Girl we couldn’t get much higher” be changed for the show. Jim Morrison agreed, but ended up performing it the way it was written and The Doors are banned from the show.

Musical Cultural Milestone: The Who

September 17, 1966: that same night The Who appeared on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. They played 2 songs, “I Can See For Miles” and “My Generation”. At the end of “My Generation”, Pete Townshend started smashing his amp and Keith Moon had his drum set rigged to explode which did cut Moon’s leg & singed Pete Townshend’s hair, along with doing damage to Townshend’s hearing. (Rolling Stone magazine article)(next CM, see October 2, 1967; see Who for expanded story)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

September 17, 1966: Joint Chiefs of Staff issued the execute order (next Vietnam, see Sept 29; see Popeye for expanded story)

M.A.S.H

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

September 17, 1972:”M.A.S.H.” premiered on CBS. Though set during the Korean War, its stories obviously paralleled and often mocked the ongoing Vietnam war. (see Sept 26)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Native Americans & Russell C Means

September 17, 1974: Federal District Court Judge Fred Nicol reprimanded the prosecution, the Justice Department and particularly the Federal Bureau of investigation and then dismissed the charges against’ Russell C Means and Dennis J Banks. (Wounded Knee, see January 30, 1989; Native Americans, see January 4, 1975)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Feminism

Vanessa Williams

September 17, 1983: Vanessa Williams became the first African American Miss America. Midway through her reign, on July 23, 1984, Williams relinquished her crown due to controversy over nude photographs of her that appeared in Penthouse magazine.  [2017 Washington Post article] (see July 19, 1984)

Malala Yousafzai

September 17, 2015: police reported that Saeed Naeem Khan, who was a public prosecutor in the Malala Yousufzai attack case, escaped an attempt on his life on in Saidu Sharif in Swat district. (Feminism, see Dec 3; Malala, see April 10, 2017)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Jack Kevorkian

September 17, 1998: videotapes appear of the voluntary euthanasia of Thomas Youk, 52, who was in the final stages of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (see JK for expanded story)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Sexual Abuse of Children

September 17, 2002: Boston Jesuit priest James Talbot charged with raping and assaulting three teenage students. [2011 story re Talbot’s release from prison] (see Sept 19)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Iraq War II

September 17, 2003:  President Bush conceded there was no evidence linking Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to the September 11, 2001 attacks. [2005 CFR article]  (see Oct 19)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Occupy Wall Street

Beginning…

September 17, 2011, Occupy Wall Street began. Approximately one thousand protesters marched on Wall Street in response to high unemployment, record executive bonuses, and extensive bailouts of the financial system. It was a Saturday and as usual, Wall Street was mostly closed. By the afternoon Zuccotti Park became the central location and camp for the protesters. The “people’s mic” became an effective way to communicate to the large groups, i.e. a speaker talks, those closest to the speaker repeat loudly what is said, those in back of the front repeat again, and so forth. (see Sept 20)

One year later…

September 17, 2012: from the NY Times: More than 100 arrests were reported on Monday, the first anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement, as protesters converged near the New York Stock Exchange and tried to block access to the exchange. (see Sept 26)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

Stop and Frisk Policy

September 17, 2013: Judge Shira Scheindlin said she would not put an overhaul of the New York City police department’s controversial stop-and-frisk program on hold because of an appeal. Scheindlin ordered changes after finding the program discriminates against minorities. She said that granting the city’s request would send the wrong signal. (see Oct 31)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

FREE SPEECH

Student Rights

September 17, 2014: rejecting free speech arguments from parents, Republican lawmakers, and conservative groups, a federal appeals court refused to reconsider a ruling that found a South Bay high school had the legal right to order students wearing American-flag adorned shirts to turn them inside out during a 2010 Cinco de Mayo celebration.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals let stand its February ruling in favor of Live Oak High School administrators, who argued that a history of problems on the Mexican holiday justified the decision to act against the American flag-wearing students. Officials at the Morgan Hill school ordered the students to either cover up the shirts or go home, citing past threats and campus strife between Latino and white students that raised fears of violence.

A unanimous three-judge panel had found that the school’s actions were reasonable given the safety concerns, which outweighed the students’ First Amendment claims. “Our role is not to second-guess the decision to have a Cinco de Mayo celebration or the precautions put in place to avoid violence,” the judges ruled.

The 9th Circuit decision relied heavily on the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1969 precedent on when schools can cite safety concerns to justify taking action that might violate student free-speech rights. (FS, see Dec 22; SR, see March 30, 2015)

Colin Kaepernick

September 17, 2016: Howard University (Washington, DC) cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem

Before Howard took on Hampton University at the AT&T Nation’s Football Classic, Howard University’s cheerleaders took a knee during “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Howard’s players did not kneel, but raised their fists instead. (FS & CK, see Sept 18)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism

TERRORISM

September 17, 2016:  Ahmad Khan Rahimi placed a bomb in a garbage can at the finish line of a United States Marine Corps charity race in Seaside Park, N.J. The race’s start time was delayed, however, and no one was hurt when the bomb exploded.

Rahimi  then traveled to Manhattan from his home in Elizabeth, N.J. pulling suitcases on rollers with each hand. He placed a homemade bomb — packed into a pressure cooker and wired to a flip-phone detonator — on a stretch of the Chelsea neighborhood’s West 23rd Street, busy with pedestrians on a warm Saturday night. The blast from that device sent glass and shrapnel flying and launched a construction waste container across the street. More than 30 people were injured.

He then placed a second bomb on West 27th Street, but a passer-by on edge from the blast four blocks away noticed it and called the police, and the bomb squad took the device away without incidentHe had planned more attacks.

The day after the Chelsea explosion, Mr. Rahimi returned to New Jersey and left a backpack containing six pipe bombs in an Elizabeth, N.J., train station. One exploded after it was detonated by a police robot, but the bombs caused no injuries. (T, see January 10, 2017; Rahimi, see October 16, 2017)

September 17 Peace Love Art Activism
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September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Palm Beach County, Florida hurricane

September 16, 1928: a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 140 miles per hour made landfall in Palm Beach County, Florida. The hurricane destroyed a levee that protected a number of small farming communities from the waters of Lake Okeechobee. Most of the residents of these low-lying communities were black migrant farm workers. When the levee was destroyed, water from Lake Okeechobee rushed into these communities, killing thousands. After the hurricane, black survivors were forced to recover the bodies of those killed. The officials in charge of the recovery effort ordered that food would be provided only to those who worked and some who refused to work were shot. The bodies of white storm victims were buried in coffins in local cemeteries, but local officials refused to provide coffins or proper burials for black victims. Instead, the bodies of many black victims were stacked in piles by the side of the roads doused in fuel oil, and burned. Authorities bulldozed the bodies of 674 black victims into a mass grave in West Palm Beach. The mass grave was not marked and the site was later sold for private industrial use; it later was used as a garbage dump, a slaughterhouse, and a sewage treatment plant. The city of West Palm Beach did not purchase the land until 2000. In 2008, on the 80th anniversary of the storm, a plaque and historical marker was erected at the mass grave site. [2003 Sun Sentinel article] (see July 15)

Crime and Punishment

September 16 – 17, 1986:  in addition to his own account of the November 12, 1984 incident, Graham presented the testimony of William Berry and Officer Townes. Graham also sought to introduce expert testimony by Dr. Robert Meadows on the subject of proper police training.

Following the presentation of plaintiff’s case, all defendants moved for a directed verdict pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 50. Upon consideration of the motions, the district court first concluded that a reasonable jury, viewing the evidence in the light most favorable to plaintiff, could not find that the infliction of force by the police officers was constitutionally excessive. The court also found that Graham’s allegation of improper or inadequate police training by the City of Charlotte was refuted by the testimony of his own expert witness. Finally, the court rejected the claim of handicap discrimination based on Sec. 504 of the Rehabilitation Act on the ground that the statute did not reach misconduct of the sort alleged by Graham. Accordingly, the district court granted all motions for a directed verdict as to all counts of the plaintiff’s complaint.

The ruling in favor of the Charlotte police will be confirmed on appeal. (C & P, see Oct 27; Graham, see May 15, 1989)

BLACK & SHOT

September 16, 2016: white police officer Betty Shelby shot and killed Terence Crutcher, a 40-year-old black man, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Crutcher was unarmed during the encounter, in which he was standing near his vehicle in the middle of a street. [2017 CNN acquittal article]  (B & S, see ; Crutcher, see May 17, 2017)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

Early “News Music”

What Did I Do…

In 1929: composed by Fats Waller with lyrics by Harry Brooks and Andy Razaf, Edith Wilson (1896 – 1981) sang “(What Did I Do to Be So) Black and Blue.”. It is a protest song that did not speak of how something should change so much as it spoke of what life was like for those who suffered inequities.

“How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live?”

In 1929 Blind Alfred Reed (1880 – 1956) wrote “How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live?” The song describes life during the Great Depression.

‘Which Side Are You On?’

In 1931, Florence Reece (1900-1986) “was a writer and social activist whose song ‘Which Side Are You On?’ became an anthem for the labor movement. Borrowing from the melody of the old hymn ”Lay the Lily Low,” Mrs. Reece wrote the union song…to describe the plight of mine workers who were organizing a strike in Harlan County, Ky. Mrs. Reece’s husband, Sam, who died in 1978, was one of those workers. Pete Seeger, the folk singer, recorded the song in 1941. It has since been used worldwide by groups espousing labor and social issues.” — New York Times Obituaries, August 6, 1986. (Labor, see March 3; Feminism, see Dec 10)

Brother Can You Spare a Dime

Also in 1931:  “Brother Can You Spare a Dime” by lyricist E. Y. “Yip” Harburg and composer Jay Gorney., the song asked why the men who built the nation – built the railroads, built the skyscrapers – who fought in the war (World War I), who tilled the earth, who did what their nation asked of them should, now that the work is done and their labor no longer necessary, find themselves abandoned, in bread lines.

Harburg believed that “songs are an anodyne against tyranny and terror and that the artist has historically always been on the side of humanity.” As a committed socialist, he spent three years in Uruguay to avoid being involved in WWI, as he felt that capitalism was responsible for the destruction of the human spirit, and he refused to fight its wars. A longtime friend of Ira Gershwin, Harburg started writing lyrics after he lost his business in the Crash of 1929. (see Yip Harburg for more about him)

“Bourgeois Blues”

In 1932 Jimmie Rogers (1897 – 1933) was born in Meridian, Mississippi worked on the railroad as his father did but at the age of 27 contracted tuberculosis and had to quit. He loved entertaining and eventually found a job singing on WWNC radio, Asheville, North Carolina (April 18, 1927). Later he began recording his songs. The tuberculosis worsened and he died in 1933 while recording songs in New York. In 1932 he recorded “Hobo’s Meditation.”

In 1938, Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter) (1888 – 1949) sang about his visit to Washington, DC with his wife and their treatment while in the nation’s capitol in his song, “Bourgeois Blues”. (BH, see Nov 22)

“Do Re Mi.”

In 1939: during the Great Depression, Woody Guthrie (1912-1967) wrote many songs reflecting the plight of farmers and migrant workers caught between the Dust Bowl drought and farm foreclosure. One of the best known of these songs is his  “Do Re Mi.”

Tom Joad

In 1940 Woody Guthrie wrote Tom Joad, a song whose character is based on John Steinbeck’s character in The Grapes of Wrath.

After hearing it, Steinbeck reportedly said, “ That f****** little b******! In 17 verses he got the entire story of a thing that took me two years to write.” * (see Feb 23)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16 Music et al

“She Loves You”

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16, 1963: the US release of “She Loves You.”  The song wasn’t a hit at first. Capitol – EMI’s US counterpart – refused to release it, and Vee Jay – which had released Please Please Me and From Me To You to little effect – also declined. Desperate for a stateside hit, Brian Epstein licensed the song to Swan Records, based in Philadelphia, although it was picked up by very few of the crucial US radio stations. (see Oct 4)

Teenage Culture
shindig

September 16, 1964: Shindig! premiered on ABC. Produced as a replacement for Hootenanny which fizzled out with the British Invasion. Shindig! will become one of a few shows providing a venue for pop music. The opener featured Sam Cooke, the Everly Brothers, the Wellingtons, Jackie and Gayle, Donna Loren, Bobby Sherman and the Righteous Brothers.

In 1965: Time Magazine called young people the “generation of conformists” (see Jan 8)

Grateful Dead

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16, 1966:   Dead poster for a show at the Avalon Ballroom, San Francisco. Undoubtedly the most famous poster from the 60’s as well as the most recognized image ever used by the Grateful Dead. The central image is a drawing done by Edward Joseph Sullivan, a late 19th and early 20th century artist. Sullivan created this drawing to illustrate one of the quatrains of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. Mouse and Kelley added the color, as the original drawing was in black and white. A thorough examination of this poster shows the excellent lettering, fine use of the ribbon motif an ideal choice of coloring and perfect framing and balance in the design. [from Professor Poster] (see October 2, 1967)

Are You Experienced

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16, 1967:  ‘Are You Experienced?‘ entered the Billboard Hot 200 album chart, where it stayed for 106 weeks, including 77 weeks in the Top 40.

In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it No.15 on their 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and two years later it was selected for permanent preservation in the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress in the United States. (see November 16 – 29, 1968)

Last live Jimi Hendrix

September 16, 1970: Hendrix joined Eric Burdon on stage at Ronnie Scotts in London for what would become the guitarist’s last ever public appearance. (see Sept 18)

Victor Jara

September 16, 1973: Allende supporter, Victor Jara, was tortured and executed. His last words, “A song has meaning when it beats in the veins of a man who will die singing. “ Jara thought American folksingers were spoiled and immature. Many have dedicated songs to Jara or referred to him in a song’s lyrics.  (see Jara for more)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

September 16 1965: César E. Chávez’s National Farm Workers Association voted to join Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) grape strike. [UFW article]  (see October 1965)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

September 16, 1974: President Ford offered conditional amnesty to thousands of Vietnam era draft evaders and military deserters who agreed to work for up to two years in public service jobs.

My sincere hope,” he said in a statement, “is that this is a constructive step toward calmer and cooler appreciation of our individual rights and responsibilities and our common purpose as a nation whose future is always more important than its past.”

In his proclamation, the President declared that “desertion in time of war is a major, serious offense,” and that draft evasion “is also a serious offense.” Such actions, he said, need not “be condoned.” “Yet,” he continued, “reconciliation calls for an act of mercy to bind the nation’s wounds and to heal the scars of divisiveness.”

Some questioned Ford’s conditional amnesty compared to his unconditional pardon for Nixon 8 days earlier. (NYT article) (Vietnam, see Dec 26; pardon, see January 21, 1977)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

INDEPENDENCE DAY

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

September 16, 1975: Papua New Guinea independent of Australia. [AG article] (see Nov 11)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

Leonard Matlovich

September 16, 197: attorneys for Sgt. Leonard Matlovich of the Air Force argued that the military was unlawfully trying to impose on him the moral standards of the majority by requiring his discharge for admitting that he was a homosexual. (LGBTQ, see Sept 22; Matlovich, see Oct 22)

Episcopal Church

September 16, 1976, LGBTQ: the Episcopal Church, at its General Convention in Minneapolis, formally approved the ordination of women as priests and bishops. (see January 27, 1977)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

Iraq War II

September 16, 2007:  employees of Blackwater Security Consulting (since renamed Academi), a private military company, shot at Iraqi civilians killing 17 and injuring 20 in Nisour Square, Baghdad. The killings outraged Iraqis and strained relations between Iraq and the United States. Blackwater guards claimed that the convoy was ambushed and that they fired at the attackers in defense of the convoy. The Iraqi government and Iraqi police investigator Faris Saadi Abdul alleged that the killings were unprovoked [Wikipedia entry] (Iraq, see Dec 30; Blackwater, see October 22, 2014)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

Feminism

Malala Yousafzai

September 16, 2013: Amnesty International announced that the recipients for its Ambassador of Conscience Award for 2013 were Malala Yousafzai and American singer, human rights and social justice activist Harry Belafonte. Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International, stated: “Our two new Ambassadors of Conscience are different from each other in many ways, but they share a dedication to the fight for human rights everywhere and for all.” (see Nov 10)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

 FREE SPEECH & Colin Kaepernick

Garfield High School’s (Seattle)

September 16, 2016: all of Garfield High School’s (Seattle) football players and coaches knelt during the national anthem.

Joined by a few players from the West Seattle Wildcats, Garfield High School’s football players and coaches kneeled during “The Star-Spangled Banner,” which head coach Joey Thomas said would continue for the rest of the season. Speaking with the Seattle Times, Thomas was candid about racial injustice and the team being compelled to protest the anthem, especially after players learned about the song’s racist third verse.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Laguna Creek High School (Sacramento)

September 16, 2016: twelve high school football players from Laguna Creek High School in Sacramento took a knee during the national anthem

According to the Sacramento Bee, a number of parents reportedly told the players to “stand up.” The Elk Grove School District announced in a statement that it would not discipline the students, saying that although it supports standing for the national anthem, it “respects and supports our students’ individual experiences and their right to exercise their freedom of speech and expression protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution.” (FS & CK, see Sept 17)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

Immigration History

September 16, 2017: California lawmakers passed a “sanctuary state” bill to protect immigrants without legal residency in the U.S., part of a broader push by Democrats to counter expanded deportation orders under the Trump administration.

The legislation by Sen. Kevin De León (D-Los Angeles), the most far-reaching of its kind in the country, would limit state and local law enforcement communication with federal immigration authorities, and prevent officers from questioning and holding people on immigration violations. (see Sept 24)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism

Marijuana

September 16 2017:in July, Republican Gov. Chris Sununu had signed a bill decriminalizing cannabis in New Hampshire.

The legislation went into effect on this date, meaning that cannabis was decriminalized in all of New England.

Under the new law, people caught possessing up to three-quarters of an ounce of marijuana would receive a $100 fine for their first or second offenses. The punishment would rise to a $300 fine for a third offense within a three-year period. If police find someone possessing small amounts of marijuana a fourth time in that window, they could be charged with a class B misdemeanor.

Until decriminalization, first-time cannabis possession was treated as a criminal misdemeanor punishable by up to one year behind bars and a $2,000 fine. (see Nov 2)

September 16 Peace Love Art Activism
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September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Nuclear/Chemical News

Cold War

September 15, 1961: U.S. started underground nuclear testing with a series of nine low yield underground experiments at Yucca Flat with a further 62 tests there in 1962. The Soviet Union activity extended to a series of 50 detonations. [NTS article on site] (CW, see Sept 22; NN, see Oct 6)

Japanese reactors

September 15, 2013: Japan started the process of switching off its last working nuclear reactor for a scheduled inspection with no restart date in sight due to public hostility towards atomic power.  [AlJazzera article] (see Oct 22)

 Rice, Walli, and Boertje-Obed

September 15, 2015: Catholic peace activists Sister Megan Rice, Michael Walli and Greg Boertje-Obed were resentenced to time served for vandalizing a storage bunker that held much of the nation’s bomb-grade uranium. Rice, Walli, and Boertje-Obed were originally convicted of felony sabotage for their 2012 actions in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where they cut through fences and sneaked into the most secure area of the Y-12 National Security Complex. Once there, they hung banners, prayed and hammered on the outside wall of the bunker to symbolize a Bible passage that refers to the end of all war: “They will beat their swords into ploughshares.” Rice was sentenced to nearly three years in prison while Walli, 66, and Boertje-Obed, 60, were each sentenced to just over five years. [CBS News article] (see January 6, 2016)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

see September 15 Music et al for more

Pendletons

September 15, 1961, the Pendletons,  from Hawthorne, California, attend their first real recording session at Hite Morgan’s studio in Los Angeles. The band recorded ‘Surfin’. They changed their name to the Beach Boys. (see Dec 8)

Four Seasons

September 15 – October 19, 1962: “Sherry” by the Four Seasons #1 Billboard Hot 100.

Otis Redding

September 15, 1965: Otis Redding released his Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul containing his composition “Respect”

Fear of Rock

September 15, 1970:Vice President Spiro Agnew stated that  American youth were being destroyed by rock music, the drug culture, and underground newspapers. (see March 27, 1971)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

September 15, 1963
Virgil Ware

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

While riding on the handlebars of his 16-year-old brother’s bicycle, near his family‘s home, 13-year-old Virgil Ware was killed on Docena-Sandusky Road, outside Birmingham, Alabama.  16-year old Larry Joe Sims shot at the Ware brothers while he was riding by on a motorbike with Michael Lee Farley. Sims shot Virgil twice,. Sims and Farley had just attended a segregationist rally. Both  were charged with first-degree murder, but an all-white jury convicted them on the lesser charge of second-degree manslaughter. Judge Wallace Gibson suspended the boys’ sentences and gave them two years probation. (see Ware for expanded story)

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing

Birmingham, AL. 18 days after King’s speech, Bobby Frank Cherry, Thomas Blanton, Herman Frank Cash, and Robert Chambliss, members of United Klans of America, a Ku Klux Klan group, planted a box of dynamite with a time delay under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, near the basement. At about 10:22 a.m., twenty-six children were walking into the basement assembly room to prepare for the sermon entitled “The Love That Forgives,” when the bomb exploded. Four girls, Addie Mae Collins (aged 14), Denise McNair (aged 11), Carole Robertson (aged 14), and Cynthia Wesley (aged 14), were killed in the attack, and 22 additional people were injured, one of whom was Addie Mae Collins’ younger sister, Sarah. The explosion blew a hole in the church’s rear wall, destroyed the back steps and all but one stained-glass window, which showed Christ leading a group of little children.

John Coltrane composed “Alabama” in response on Nov 18). The following year Joan Baez released “Birmingham Sunday” and Phil Ochs released “On Her Hand a Golden Ring” (BH, see Oct 2; Sixteenth Street, see September 26, 1977; CB, see June 16, 1964)

Muhammad Ali

September 15, 1965: Joe Namath took his Army physical. (BH, see Sept 24; Vietnam, see Sept 25; Ali (Namath), see December 9).

Ali/Spinks

September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15, 1978: exactly seven months after losing to Spinks was their rematch in the New Orleans Superdome.

Ali defeated the younger Spinks, becoming boxing’s first three-time heavyweight champion. [Guardian article] (Ali, see December 12, 1981, BH, see Sept 30)

Autherine Lucy Foster

September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15, 2017: the University of Alabama unveiled an historic marker honoring Autherine Lucy Foster, the first black student to be admitted to an all-white public school or university in Alabama.

Foster attended the unveiling which was part of a larger campus ceremony at the College of Education.

Approximately 10% of the University of Alabama’s students are black. Approximately 25% of the State’s population is black. [UA article] (see Oct 13)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Environmental Issues

September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15, 1970: Greenpeace was founded. [site] (see Dec 2)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Weather Underground

September 15, 1970: the WUO helped Timothy Leary escape from the California Men’s Colony prison. [Countyourculture article] (see March 1, 1971)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

UAW

September 15, 1970: more than 350,000 members of the United Auto Workers begin what is to become a 69-day strike against General Motors. (see June 8, 1971)

Joseph Yablonski

September 15, 1977: “Tony” Boyle pleaded not guilty at the opening of his second trial on the charge of murder in the Joseph Yablonski case. (see February 18, 1978)

NHL lockout

September 15, 2004: National Hockey League owners agreed to lock out the players.  [SI article] (The 2004-05 season was eventually canceled.) (see Oct 5)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Hurricane Katrina

September 15, 2005: President George W. Bush, addressing the nation from storm-ravaged New Orleans, acknowledged the government failed to respond adequately to Hurricane Katrina and urged Congress to approve a massive reconstruction program. (see Katrina for expanded story)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Great Recession of 2008

September 15, 2008: Lehman Brothers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, laying the catalyst for the global financial crisis.

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Iraq War II

September 15, 2009:  shoe-thrower Muntader al-Zaidi was released for good behavior, after serving nine months of the sentence. [Guardian article] (see August 18, 2010)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Occupy Wall Street

September 15, 2012: on the first of three days of events planned for the one-year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, about 250 people marched down Broadway from Washington Square toward Zuccotti Park, accompanied by a large number of police officers on foot, in marked and unmarked cars, and riding scooters. [Vanity Fair article] (see Sept 17)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

September 15, 2015: a federal appeals court denied Kim Davis’s motion to halt a requirement that she issue marriage licenses to gay couples.

Davis has not demonstrated a substantial likelihood of success on her federal constitutional claims,” the panel of judges said in their order denying the request. [New Yorker article] (Sept 21)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism

Marijuana

September 15, 2015: administrative Law Judge John S. Kennedy ruled that Lora Barbour, the mother of a Genny Barbour who had epilepsy, could not come to school to feed her daughter cannabis oil that had helped control her seizures. Kennedy said that state and federal drug possession laws trump their right to use medical marijuana on school grounds. It was the third legal defeat for the Barbour Family of Maple Shade, NJ. In addition to the conflicts in state and federal law, state Kennedy said the family failed to show their daughter Genny would suffer “irreparable harm” if denied medical marijuana in school, according to his 11-page decision. “There are no doctor’s reports from (Genny Barbour’s) treating physician that would establish that her lunchtime dose of marijuana is medically necessary,” Kennedy wrote. (NJ.com article) (M, see Oct 19; Barbours, see Nov 9)

September 15 Peace Love Art Activism
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