Category Archives: Peace Love Art and Activism

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes

September 29 Peace Love Activism

September 29, 1910: the Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes formed. A year later, it merged with other groups to form the National Urban League “to enable African Americans to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights.” [Theodore Roosevelt site article] (see April 8, 1911)

Jim Crow

September 29, 1915: the Jim Crow racial segregation laws enacted and enforced in the American South in the late 19th and early 20th centuries enforced the strict boundaries of a legalized racial caste system and worked to restore and maintain white supremacy in the region. Even after the Civil War and Reconstruction amendments had ended slavery and declared black people to be citizens with civil rights and the power to vote, many Southern state and local lawmakers passed laws forbidding blacks and whites from playing checkers or pool together, entering a circus through the same entrance, or being buried in the same cemetery.

In some instances, these laws interfered with the provision of very important services, including education and health care. On September 29, 1915, the Alabama legislature passed a law forbidding any “white female nurse” from treating a black male patient in any public or private medical facility. Punishment for violation of the law included a fine of $10-$200 and up to six months incarceration or hard labor. An outgrowth of the long-held Southern fear that white women were at risk of attack and assault whenever in the presence of black men, similar action was taken in Georgia in 1911. (see Dec 4)

Houston Revolt (August 23, 1917)

September 29, 1918: five more soldiers hung. (BH, see February – August 1919; RR, see May 10 – 11, 1919)

Barratry

September 29, 1956: in an attempt to restrict the activities of the NAACP, Virginia passed a set of laws against barratry, champertry, and maintenance. Barratry is defined as “stirring up” litigation by encouraging people to sue when they might not have done so on their own.

The laws were a blatant attempt to prevent the NAACP from pursuing civil rights cases in the state. (BH, Oct 20; Virginia, see April 2, 1963)

James H Meredith
September 29, 1962
  • President Kennedy dispatched the Federal Marshals to Mississippi – lightly armed men clad awkwardly in suits, ties and gas masks. At the same time, JFK wanted Gov Ross Barnett to assure him that Mississippi patrolmen would help maintain law and order as the threat of a race riot on the university campus in Oxford grew.
  • Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett spoke at halftime of the University of Mississippi’s game against Kentucky. Barnett whipped up the crowd, with some later comparing it to a Nazi Nuremberg rally. Interrupted by cheers, Barnett told those gathered, “I love Mississippi. I love her people. Our customs. I love and respect our heritage.” [2014 NYT article] (see Sept 30)
Orangeburg Massacre

In late September/early October 1970: after the trial, a jury found Cleveland Sellers guilty  of participating in a riot two nights before the Orangeburg shootings.

He was the only person tried in relation to the the 1968 event.  [Black Past article on Sellers] (BH, see Oct 26; OM, see September 1, 1973)

SOUTH AFRICA/APARTHEID

September 29, 1986: the House of Representatives overrides the President Reagan’s veto of the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act. (see Oct 2)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Nuclear/Chemical News

September 29 Peace Love Activism

September 29, 1957: The Mayak or Kyshtym nuclear complex (Soviet Union). A fault in the cooling system at the nuclear complex, near Chelyabinsk, results in a chemical explosion and the release of an estimated 70 to 80 tonnes of radioactive materials into the air. Thousands of people are exposed to radiation and thousands more are evacuated from their homes. It is categorized as Level 6 on the seven-point International Nuclear Events Scale (INES). [2017 Stanford U article] (see Oct 7)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

September 29 Music et al

Bob Dylan

September 29, 1961: Robert Shelton of the New York Times reviewed Dylan’s Gerde’s performance. With the headline, Bob Dylan: A Distinctive Folk-Song Stylist, Shelton wrote, “A bright new face in folk music is appearing at Gerde’s Folk City. Although only 20 years old, Bob Dylan is one of the most distinctive stylists to play in a Manhattan cabaret in months.” (see Nov 4)

West Side Story

September 29 – October 19, 1962: West Side Story soundtrack returns to Billboard’s #1 album.

see John Lennon and George Harrison for more

September 29, 1967: John Lennon and George Harrison took part in an interview with David Frost for The Frost Programme. It was recorded before a studio audience between 6pm and 7pm at Studio One at Wembley Studios in London. Among their comments:

Lennon: “Buddha was a groove, Jesus was all right.”

Harrison: “I believe in reincarnation. Life and death are still only relative to thought. I believe in rebirth. You keep coming back until you have got it straight. The ultimate thing is to manifest divinity, and become one with The Creator.” (see Oct 17)

Okie from Muskogee

September 29, 1969, Merle Haggard released single, “Okie from Muskogee.” By November 15, it reached No. 1 on the Billboard magazine Hot Country Singles chart, where it remained for four weeks. It also became a minor pop hit as well, reaching number 41 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. “Okie from Muskogee” — along with the album, Okie from Muskogee — was named the Country Music Association Single of the Year in 1970.

The song’s lyrics typified the view that many Americans felt toward the changes that had occurred during the decade.

We don’t smoke marijuana in Muskogee;
We don’t take our trips on LSD
We don’t burn our draft cards down on Main Street;
We like livin’ right, and bein’ free.
I’m proud to be an Okie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightnin’s still the biggest thrill of all
We don’t make a party out of lovin’;
We like holdin’ hands and pitchin’ woo;
We don’t let our hair grow long and shaggy
Like the hippies out in San Francisco do.

And I’m proud to be an Okie from Muskogee,
A place where even squares can have a ball.
We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
And white lightnin’s still the biggest thrill of all.
Leather boots are still in style for manly footwear;
Beads and Roman sandals won’t be seen.
Football’s still the roughest thing on campus,
And the kids here still respect the college dean. We still wave Old Glory down at the courthouse,
In Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA.

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

Operation Popeye

September 29 1966 — October 28 1966:  the US military began Project Popeye in a strip of the Laos panhandle east of the Bolovens Plateau in the Se Kong River valley. Naval personnel eventually conducted 50 seeding cloud experiments. Project leaders claimed that 82% of the clouds produced rain within a brief period after having been seeded and that one of the clouds drifted across the Vietnam border and dropped nine inches of rain on a US Special Forces camp over a four hour period. (next V, see “In October” ; see OP for expanded story)

LBJ commitment

September 29, 1967: LBJ spoke about American commitment to US involvement in Vietnam  (see Oct 9)

Presidential Commission on Campus Unrest

September 29, 1970:  Vice President Agnew charged that the Presidential Commission on Campus Unrest had indulged in “‘scapegoating’ of the most irresponsible sort” in saying that only the President could offer the moral leadership needed to reunite the country. (NYT article) (see Oct 12; FS, see June 7, 1971)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Native Americans

September 29, 1969: Alcatraz Takeover: the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a plan by Lama Hunt to turn the Federal prison site of Alcatraz Island into a monument to the US space program. (see Oct 9)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Watergate Scandal

September 29, 1972: John Mitchell, while serving as attorney general, controlled a secret Republican fund used to finance widespread intelligence-gathering operations against the Democrats, the Post reports. (see Watergate for expanded story)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

Jack Kevorkian

September 29, 2005: in an MSNBC interview, Kevorkian said that if he were granted parole, he would not resume directly helping people die and would restrict himself to campaigning to have the law changed. (see JK for expanded story)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

September 29 Peace Love Activism

September 29, 2011: the Log Cabin Republicans is an organization of lesbian and gay Republicans, working within the Republican Party to advocate for lesbian and gay rights. It operates in the face of hostility from the vast majority of GOP leaders who have been beholden to the Religious Right in opposition to lesbian and gay rights. In Log Cabin Republicans v. United States, the organization challenged the constitutionality of the Pentagon’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, under which the military would not ask about sexual orientation, and homosexuals would be allowed to serve in the military as long as they did not mention their sexual orientation. In early September 2010 a U.S. District Court declared the DADT policy an unconstitutional violation of the First and Fifth Amendments, but on this day, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the decision on the grounds that the legislative repealed of DADT, in December 2010, rendered the case moot. As a consequence, the District Court decision had no value as legal precedent.

President Barack Obama signed the DADT repeal act into law on the 22nd of December 2010, and the repeal took effect on September 20, 2011. (see Dec 6)

September 29 Peace Love Art Activism
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September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

FREE SPEECH

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

September 28, 1842: In People v. Richard Hobbes and People v. Henry R. Robinsona New York grand jury indicted publishers of obscene books. In People v. Richard Hobbes and People v. Henry R. Robinson for the first time in US history . In addition, indictments were issued against the five print shop owners and book stand operators used by the two publishers. Titles named in the indictments: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure; Memoirs of the Life and Voluptuous Adventures of the Celebrated Courtesan Mademoiselle Celestine of Paris; The Cabinet of Venus Unlocked; The Curtain Drawn Up, or The Education of Laura; The Confessions of a Voluptuous Young Lady of High Rank; The Amorous Songster or Jovial Companion; The Lustful Turk; The Amorous History and Adventures of Raymond De B— and Father Andouillard; The Auto-Biography of a Footman. (see July 19, 1911)

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Opelousas Massacre

September 28, 1868:  one of the worst outbreaks of violence during Reconstruction took place in Opelousas, La. The event started with three local members of the KKK-like Knights of the White Camelia beating newspaper editor Emerson Bentley, who had promoted voter registration and education for all. After some African Americans came to his rescue, bands of armed white mobs roamed the countryside and began killing. It is estimated that more than 200 blacks and 30 whites died in the Opelousas Massacre [Black Past article]. (see January 5, 1869)

Omaha, Nebraska race revolt

September 28 Peace Love Activism

September 28, 1919: a major race riot erupted in Omaha, Nebraska. A white mob of about 4,000 people lynched and burned the body of Willie Brown, an African-American who was being held in the county jail. The mayor of Omaha, who was white, was almost lynched by the mob, which set fire to the county courthouse.

The origin of the revolt lay in racial conflict in the extensive city stockyards and meat packing plants. (A similar conflict underlay the East St. Louis race revolt that began on July 2, 1917.)  Rumors that Willie Brown had raped a white woman spurred the lynching. Later reports by the police and U.S. Army investigators determined that the victim had not made a positive identification. The riot lasted for two days, and ended when over 1,200 federal troops arrived to restore order. Although martial law was not formally proclaimed, for all practical purposes it existed, with troops remaining in the city for several weeks. [Black Past article] (see Oct 1)

Gary, Indiana integration protests

September 28, 1927: student against integration in Gary, Indiana continued to protest and now numbered over 1300. Family and other local citizen also protested the proposed school integration. City, school, and district officials met with protesters to begin negotiations for bringing the strike to an end. (see Sept 30)

James H Meredith

September 28, 1962: federal marshals, patrolmen from the Texas – Mexico border, and 110 Army engineers with 49 trucks, van, tractor-trailers, and Jeeps loaded with equipment arrived in Memphis, TN in anticipation of a showdown regarding the admission of Meredith. (see September 29, 1962)

Black Panthers

September 28, 1968: a judge sentenced Huey P. Newton to 2 to 15 years in state prison. [PBS story] (BH, see Oct 16; Black Panthers, see “In November”)

Muhammad Ali

September 28, 1976:  Ali defeated Ken Norton in the fifteenth and final round at Yankee Stadium. Though Norton was ahead through the first eight rounds, Ali pulls through to win all but one of the subsequent rounds. As with Frazier the year before, this bout ended the three-fight series between Ali and Norton. (NYT article) (Ali, see February 15, 1978; BH, see Nov 12)

Johnnie Mae Chappell

September 28, 2005:  retired detectives Lee Cody and Don Coleman, who had led the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office investigation into the 1964 murder of Johnnie Mae Chappell, answered subpoenas sent by the state attorney’s office.

Detective Lee Cody said that in all the years he’d been involved in the Chappell case, it was the first time he’d ever been under oath. Cody and Detective Don Coleman took confessions from the three men, but the charges against them were dropped. (BH & Chappell, see Oct 11)

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

September 28 Music et al

Hey Jude

September  28 – November 29, 1968, The Beatles after live performances: “Hey Jude” #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. “Hey Jude” was released in August 1968 as the first single from the Beatles’ record label Apple Records. More than seven minutes in length, it was at the time the longest single ever to top the British charts.[1] It also spent nine weeks at number one in the United States, the longest for any Beatles single. “Hey Jude” tied the “all-time” record, at the time, for the longest run at the top of the US charts. The single has sold approximately eight million copies and is frequently included on professional critics’ lists of the greatest songs of all time. (see Oct 18)

see Time Peace: The Rascals Greatest Hits for more

September 28 Peace Love Activism

September 28 – October 4, 1968: The Rascals’ Time Peace: The Rascals Greatest Hits is the Billboard #1 album.

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

George Wallace

September 28, 1972: Arthur Bremer’s sentence reduced to 53 years after appeal. (NYT article) (see November 9, 2007)

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

ADA

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

September 28, 1987: protesters demanded better access to mass transit systems by blocking buses at a transit association convention. The number of arrests in two days rose to at least 54. ”It’s a very emotional issue for disabled people to have to come out here and do this,” said Judy Heumann of the World Institute on Disability, an organization based in Berkeley. (see March 13, 1988)

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

Feminism

Violence Against Women Act

September 28, 1994: the House of Representatives passed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), enhancing states’ ability to respond to domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault. (see In February 1995)

RU-486

September 28, 2000: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of mifepristone (RU-486) for the termination of early pregnancy, defined as 49 days or less. (see Nov 7)

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism

Iraq War II

September 28, 2004:  the same intelligence unit that produced a gloomy report in July 2004 about the prospect of growing instability in Iraq warned the Bush administration about the potential costly consequences of an American-led invasion two months before the war began, government officials said. [NYT article] (see Oct 7)

September 28 Peace Love Art Activism
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September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

Feminism

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

September 27, 1909: New York shirtwaist strike of 1909, also known as the Uprising of the 20,000, was a labor strike primarily involving Jewish women working in New York shirtwaist factories. Led by Clara Lemlich and supported by the National Women’s Trade Union League of America (NWTUL). [JWA article] (Labor, see Nov 22; Feminism see Jan 2, 1910)

Change to Win

September 27, 2005: the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the Teamsters, and other activist unions leave the AFL-CIO to form a new labor coalition called Change to Win. The move represents a new emphasis on organizing workers to bring them into a labor movement starved for members. (January 2, 2006)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Emma Goldman

September 27, 1919: Goldman posted bond and was released from federal prison. She left for Rochester, NY, knowing she would soon receive deportation orders. [NYT article] (see Goldman for expanded story)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Gary Indiana School Desegregation

September 27, 1927: in Gary Indiana, the crowd swelled to about 800 students. Superintendent Wirt hedged his bets by telling the angry crowd that “possibly when a new black school was erected on the east side, Emerson would be again segregated.” (see Sept 28)

A Philip Randolph

September 27, 1940:  civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph met with President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the White House to demand racial integration of the U.S. Armed forces. Congress had created a draft in response to the outbreak of war in Europe, which was to take effect on October 16, 1940. The law contained a provision prohibiting race discrimination, but Randolph felt the military was not honoring it. The meeting with Roosevelt did not go well, and afterwards the administration issued a false report that Randolph had accepted the president’s plan, for which it quickly had to apologize.

U.S. armed forces remained segregated during World War II. Winfred Lynn’s challenge to the segregated draft was unsuccessful (Armed services, see December 4, 1942 &  February 3, 1944). (next Black History, see Nov 13)

School Desegregation

SEPTEMBER 27, 1958: following the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, school boards across the country were ordered to draft desegregation plans. The school board in Little Rock, Arkansas, drafted a plan and agreed to implement it during the 1957-1958 school year. When nine black students, known as the Little Rock Nine, made their way to Central High School as part of Arkansas’s gradual desegregation plan, they were met by angry crowds and the Arkansas National Guard blocking their entry. Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus encouraged the protesters and did everything in his power to hinder integration. Eventually, President Dwight Eisenhower deployed federal troops to Arkansas and commanded the Arkansas National Guard to escort the students to school.

Not yet through with his attempts to thwart integration, Faubus devised another plan. Following the 1957-1958 school year, the Little Rock School Board petitioned for a delay in the implementation of its desegregation plan. A federal district judge granted a delay until 1961, which the NAACP promptly appealed. The case made its way to the Supreme Court where, on September 12, 1958, the Court ordered immediate integration.

By that time, the Arkansas Legislature had passed a law allowing Governor Faubus to close public schools and later hold a special election to determine public support. Immediately after the Supreme Court released its decision, the governor ordered all four public high schools closed pending a public vote. On September 27, 1958, the people of Arkansas voted overwhelmingly (19,470 to 7561) to keep the schools closed rather than integrate. The schools would remain closed for the entire 1958-1959 academic term, known as “the lost year.” (BH, see Oct 14; SD, see Oct 25)

James H Meredith

September 27, 1962: a fourth attempt to enroll. Meredith in the University of Mississippi was canceled after it became evident that his life would be endangered. (see September 28, 1962)

Medgar Evers

September 27, 1973: New Orleans police arrested Byron De La Beckwith who had a bomb and several rifles in his car. He stated he had come to New Orleans to sell china. Police stated that De La Beckwith intended to blow up the home of A I Botnick, head of the New Orleans chapter of B’nai B’rith. It was the first day of Rosh Hashanah. Botnick had moved his family out of New Orleans several days earlier after receiving threatening calls. (see Oct 11)

Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act

September 27, 2007: the Senate passed the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act  as an amendment to another bill. President George W Bush indicated he would veto the legislation if it reached his desk. The amendment was dropped by the Democratic leadership because of opposition from conservative groups and President George Bush, and due to the measure being attached to a defense bill there was a lack of support from antiwar Democrats. (LGBTQ, see Nov 8; BH, see March 26, 2008; Shepard, see April 2, 2009)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Religion and Public Education

September 27, 1948: Circuit Judge Grover Watson ordered the Champaign school board to stop all religious education in all public school buildings. NYT article (see November 20, 1948)

Environmental Issues

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

September 27, 1962: Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring published. The book is widely credited with helping to launch the contemporary American environmental movement. The New Yorker magazine had started serializing Silent Spring in June 1962. Rachel Carson was already a well-known writer on natural history, but had not previously been a social critic. The book was widely read—especially after its selection by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the New York Times best-seller list—and inspired widespread public concerns with pesticides and pollution of the environment. Silent Spring facilitated the ban of the pesticide DDT[3] for agricultural use in 1972 in the United States. NYT article (see Dec 7)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

The Cold War  & Nuclear/Chemical News

September 27, 1962: Soviet Union above ground nuclear test. 10 – 30 megaton. (CW, see Oct 7; NN, see Oct 22)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

JFK Assassination

September 27 Peace Love Activism

September 27, 1964: the report of the Warren Commission chaired by Chief Justice Earl Warren on the Kennedy assassination was released. The report essentially concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone. [text of report] (see October 5, 1966)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

September 27 Peace Love Activism

September 27, 1967: an advertisement headed “A Call To Resist Illegitimate Authority,” signed by over 320 influential people (professors, writers, ministers, and other professional people), appeared in the New Republic and the New York Review of Books, asking for funds to help youths resist the draft.

A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority” was one of the most powerful and important indictments of the Vietnam War by the anti-war movement. It declared that “the war is unconstitutional and illegal. Congress has not declared a war as required by the Constitution.” Additionally, “this war violates international agreements, treaties and principles of law which the United States Government has solemnly endorsed.” The Call was published in the New York Review of Books, The Nation, and other publications. [text] (see Sept 29)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Sexual Abuse of Children

September 27, 2004: Bishop Thomas Dupre was indicted on child rape charges, becoming the first bishop to face charges in the church sex abuse scandal. Dupree was the head of the Springfield, Mass., diocese, but resigned in February after the allegations came to light. His two alleged victims have said Dupre sexually abused them for years in the 1970s and asked them to keep quiet about the abuse when he was made auxiliary bishop in 1990. (NYT article) (see Nov 15)

September 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Affordable Care Act

September 27, 2017

  • US Senators Cory Booker, Brian Schatz, Chris Murphy, and Elizabeth Warren wrote to Seema Verma, the Administrator for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In the letter they expressed concern for the Trump administration’s decision to shut down the Affordable Care Act website for 12 hours nearly every Sunday during the upcoming open enrollment. [Star Advertiser article]
  • the Department of Health and Human Services told stated that for the first time it would not be sending its regional directors to help states with planning for the upcoming open enrollment period. [BuzzFeed article]  (see Dec 21)
September 27 Peace Love Art Activism
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