Category Archives: Today in history

October 5 Peace Love Activism

October 5 Peace Love Activism

Native Americans

Tecumseh
October 5, 1813:  during the War of 1812, General William Harrison's American army defeated a combined British and Indian force at the Battle of the Thames near Ontario, Canada. The leader of the Indian forces was Tecumseh, the Shawnee chief who organized inter-tribal resistance to the encroachment of white settlers on Indian lands. He was killed in the fighting. Tecumseh's death marked the end of Indian resistance east of the Mississippi River and soon after most of the depleted tribes were forced west. (see March 3, 1819)
Chief Joseph
October 5, 1877: Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce Indians surrendered to U.S. General Nelson A. Miles in the Bear Paw mountains of Montana, declaring, "Hear me, my chiefs: My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever."

Earlier in the year, the U.S. government broke a land treaty with the Nez Perce, forcing the group out of their homeland in Wallowa Valley in the Northwest for relocation in Idaho. In the midst of their journey, Chief Joseph learned that three young Nez Perce warriors, enraged at the loss of their homeland, had massacred a band of white settlers. Fearing retaliation by the U.S. Army, the chief began one of the great retreats in American military history.

For more than three months, Chief Joseph led fewer than 300 Nez Perce Indians toward the Canadian border, covering a distance of more than 1,000 miles as the Nez Perce outmaneuvered and battled more than 2,000 pursuing U.S. soldiers. During the long retreat, he treated prisoners humanely and won the admiration of whites by purchasing supplies along the way rather than stealing them. Finally, only 40 miles short of his Canadian goal, Chief Joseph was cornered by the U.S. Army, and his people were forcibly relocated to a barren reservation in Indian Territory.  (see November 1, 1879)

BLACK HISTORY

White terrorist vigilantism 
October 5,1920: four black men were killed in Macclenny, Florida, following the death of a prominent young white local farmer named John Harvey. According to news reports at the time, Harvey was shot and killed at a turpentine camp near MacClenny on October 4, 1920. The suspected shooter, a young black man named Jim Givens, fled immediately afterward and mobs of armed white men formed to pursue him. Givens’s brother and two other black men connected to him were questioned and jailed during the search, though there was no evidence or accusation that they had been involved in the killing of Harvey.

Those three men - Fulton Smith, Ray Field, and Ben Givens - were held in the Baker County Jail late into the night until, around 1:00 a.m. on October 5, a mob of about 50 white men overtook the jail and seized the men from their cells. The mob forced the men to the outskirts of town, where they were tied to trees and shot to death. A fourth lynching victim, Sam Duncan, was found shot to death nearby later in the day. Also with no alleged ties to the killing of John Harvey, Duncan was thought to be an unfortunate soul who had encountered a mob seeking Jim Givens and been killed simply for being a black man.

Three days later, the Chicago Defender, a Northern black newspaper, reported that most of the black community of Macclenny had deserted the area in fear of further violent attacks while whites posses continued to search for Jim Givens. (see Oct 20)

School Desegregation

clinton high school

October 5, 1957: early in the morning a series of dynamite explosions severely damaged the Clinton High School building [Clinton, TN] An estimated 75 to 100 sticks of dynamite had been placed in three locations in the building. No one was injured. Clinton High School did not reopen until  1960. (BH, see Oct 10; SD, see February 20, 1958)

Technological Milestone

Televised presidential address
October 5, 1947: President Harry Truman made the first-ever televised presidential address from the White House, asking Americans to cut back on their use of grain in order to help starving Europeans. In 1947, television was still in its infancy and the number of TV sets in U.S. homes only numbered in the thousands. (see Oct 14)
Space Race
October 5, 1957: the Soviet daily newspaper Pravda mentioned Sputnik in a short piece at the bottom of page one. When bold headlines and major stories run in British and American newspapers, the U.S.S.R. realized that the Sputnik program was a huge propaganda tool. (see Nov 3)

see October 5 Music et al for more

see Wynonie Harris for more
October 5, 1948: Wynonie Harris's "Good Rockin' Tonight" hits #1 on the R&B chart. (see March 31, 1949)

Love Me Do“/”P.S. I Love You
October 5, 1962, The Beatles before their US appearance: released first single, "Love Me Do"/"P.S. I Love You", in the UK. (see Oct 27) 

Otis Redding

 

October 5, 1966: Otis Redding released Complete & Unbelievable: The Otis Redding Dictionary of Soul album, his fifth.

Jimi Hendrix
October 5, 1966: Jimi Hendrix, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding played together for the first time. (see Dec 26)
Waiting for the Sun
October 5 – 11, 1968: The Doors’ Waiting for the Sun returned to the Billboard #1 album position.
 
October 5 Peace Love Activism

World Series

Pirates v Yankees
October 5 - 13, 1960: the 1960 World Series [Pittsburgh Pirates (NL) vs. NY Yankees (AL)] is notable for the Game 7, ninth-inning home run hit by Bill Mazeroski, which won the game for the Pirates 10–9.
Orioles v Dodgers
October 5 - 9, 1966: World Series: Baltimore Orioles against the defending champion Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Orioles sweeping the Series in four games to capture their first championship in franchise history.

JFK Assassination

October 5, 1966:  the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals reversed the murder conviction of Jack Ruby, who was sentenced to death in for the slaying of Lee Harvey Oswald, assassin of President Kennedy. (NYT article) (see January 3, 1967)

Nuclear/Chemical News

October 5, 1966: The Fermi Nuclear Generating Station, less than 40 miles from Detroit, suffered a partial fuel meltdown, although no radioactive material was released. It operated for another nine years before being deactivated. (see January 27, 1967)

Vietnam & Weather Underground

October 5, 1969: the Haymarket Police Statue in Chicago was bombed; Weathermen claim credit for the bombing in their book, Prairie Fire. (see Oct 8 – 11)

Iran–Contra Affair

October 5, 1986: Eugene Hasenfus is captured by troops of the Sandinista regime in Nicaragua after the plane in which he is flying is shot down; two others on the plane die in the crash. Under questioning, Hasenfus confessed that he was shipping military supplies into Nicaragua for use by the Contras, an anti-Sandinista force that had been created and funded by the United States. Most dramatically, he claimed that operation was really run by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). (see Nov 3)

FREE SPEECHmapplethorpe

October 5, 1990: Cincinnati jurors took about two hours to acquit the Contemporary Arts Center and its director, Dennis Barrie, of the charge of pandering obscenity for showing sexually explicit photographs that were part of Mapplethorpe's traveling retrospective, ''The Perfect Moment.'' The acquittal was resounding because it took place in a city that has tough laws and a record of vigorously prosecuting obscenity. (see June 22, 1992)

US Labor History

California supermarket janitors
October 5, 2004: some 2,100 supermarket janitors in California, mostly from Mexico, win a $22.4 million settlement over unpaid overtime. Many said they worked 70 or more hours a week, often seven nights a week from 10 p.m. to 9 a.m. Cleaner Jesus Lopez told the New York Times he only had three days off in five years. (see March 23, 2005)
Occupy Wall Street
October 5, 2011: thousands of union workers joined protesters marching through the Financial District, resulting in about 200 arrests later in the same evening when dozens of protesters stormed barricades blocking them from Wall Street and the Stock Exchange. Police responded with pepper spray and penned the protesters in with orange netting.  (NYT article)  (see Oct 25)

October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, October 5 Peace Love Activism, 

Please follow and like us:

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4 Peace Love Activism

Feminism & Matilda Josyln Gage

October 4, 1850: Gage [24 years old] signed petition stating that she would face a 6-month prison term and a $2,000 fine rather than obey the Fugitive Slave Law. (F, see June 21, 1851; Gage, see September 1852)

Emma Goldman

October 4 - 16,1893: Goldman was tried and found guilty of inciting to riot. She was sentenced to one year in the penitentiary on Blackwell's Island in New York's East River. (see May 11, 1894)

Calvin Graham

October 4, 1944: Graham wrote to the Chief of Naval Personnel requesting a discharge certificate. Each of Graham’s requests was denied upon the basis that his enlistment was void and therefore canceled. Also that month, Graham’s claim for arrears of pay and mustering-out pay was presented to the General Accounting Office. (full story see Calvin Graham)

Space Race

Sputnik 1
October 4, 1957: the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1 into earth orbit. The first man-made satellite passes overhead, making one revolution every 90 minutes. (see Oct 5)

October 4, 1959, Space Race: the Soviet Luna 3 flew  around the moon, taking the first photographs of the far side of the moon. Two more Soviet launches the following year will not achieve proper flight paths. Information about them will be suppressed. (article) (see April 13, 1960) 

FREE SPEECH

Lenny Bruce

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4, 1961: police arrested comedian Lenny Bruce  at the Jazz Workshop in San Francisco on obscenity charges for saying the word “cocksucker.” Bruce was a pioneer in aggressive, politically oriented stand-up comedy, using humor to attack racism, sexual prudery, and religious hypocrisy in American life. Today’s tradition of boundary-breaking stand-up comedy, with respect to language, sex, politics, race, and religion, originated with Lenny Bruce.

Many observers then and now argue that Bruce’s arrests, including those in Chicago and New York City, were prompted not by dirty words but by his comedy routines that made fun of the Catholic Church, which offended local politicians and police. For his New York City arrest, see November 4, 1964. For that arrest, he was pardoned by New York Governer Pataki 39 years later on December 23, 2003. (see June 25, 1963)
Nazi march
October 4, 1976: Frank Collin, leader of a band of Nazi sympathizers from Chicago's South side, sends a letter to Daniel D. Brown, Director of Parks and Recreation, Skokie Park District, requesting that his group be permitted to march in Skokie's "Birch Park" on November 6, 1976. (see Oct 25)

The Cold War

Yankees v Reds

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4 – 9, 1961: World Series: NY Yankees vs. the Cincinnati Reds. Yankees won in five games to earn their 19th championship in 39 seasons. This World Series was surrounded by Cold War political puns pitting the "Reds" against the "Yanks".  (see Oct 6)
Yankees v Giants
October 4 – 16, 1962: World Series matched the defending World Series champions NY  Yankees against the San Francisco Giants. The Yankees took the Series in seven games for the 20th championship in team history.
Cardinals v Red Sox
October 4 – 12, 1967: World Series: St. Louis Cardinals against the Boston Red Sox in a rematch of the 1946 World Series, with the Cardinals winning in seven games.

October 4 Music et al

Beatles Ready Set Go
October 4, 1963: appear on BBC’s Ready, Set, Go. Dusty Springfield does intros and asked fan questions. (see Oct 13) 

Good Vibrations

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4, 1966,  after over six months of recording and production work, the Beach Boys (actually Brian Wilson) released "Good Vibrations." (NPR story) (see December 10 – 16)

see Gold Rush Festival for more

October 4, 1969, Gold Rush Festival (Lake Amador, CA): 40,000 people attended.
Janis Joplin

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4, 1970 – Janis Joplin, age 27, died. (27 Club) (Woodstock video)

INDEPENDENCE DAY

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4, 1966: Lesotho independent from United Kingdom. (see Nov 30)

WAR POWERS ACT

October 4, 1973: Joint conference committee irons out differences between House and Senate War Powers Act bills. (NYT article) (see Oct 10)

Watergate Scandal

October 4, 1974: the trial of Watergate conspirators HR Haldeman, John Erlichman, John Mitchell, Robert Mardian, and Kenneth Parkinson began, Judge John Sirica presiding. (see Dec 19)
October 4 Peace Love Activism

TERRORISM

October 4 Peace Love Activism

October 4, 2002: “Shoe bomber,” Richard Reid, pled guilty to all eight counts. (NYT article) (see Nov 4) 

October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, October 4 Peace Love Activism, 

 

Please follow and like us:

October 3 Peace Love Activism

October 3 Peace Love Activism

FREE SPEECH

October 3, 1915: John Sumner was appointed to replace Anthony Comstock as leader of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice (NYSSV). He pledged to continue Comstock’s censorship crusade against alleged indecent literature under the 1873 Comstock Act (March 3, 1873), the most important federal censorship law for almost 100 years. The NYSSV was the leading censorship organization from its founding in 1873 through the late 1930s, (see March 3, 1919)

INDEPENDENCE DAYS

Kingdom of Yugoslavia
 October 3, 1929: The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes changed its name to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. (ID, see Dec 11, 1931; Yugoslavia, see June 25, 1991)

Iraq

October 3, 1932: Iraq independent from the United Kingdom. (see November 22, 1943)
Germany
October 3, 1990: Germany reunited. (NYT article) (see April 9, 1991)

October 3 Music et al

Roots of Rock
October 3, 1945: Elvis Presley made his first ever-public appearance in a talent contest at the Mississippi Alabama Dairy Show singing 'Old Shep', Elvis was 10 years old at the time and came second. (see October 5, 1948)
Howl and Other Poems
October 3, 1957: at the conclusion of the obscenity trial regarding Howl and Other Poems, Judge Clayton W. Horn ruled that the poem was not obscene. In his decision, he stated that, “I do not believe that "Howl" is without redeeming social importance. The first part of "Howl" presents a picture of a nightmare world; the second part is an indictment of those elements in modern society destructive of the best qualities of human nature; such elements are predominantly identified as materialism, conformity, and mechanization leading toward war. The third part presents a picture of an individual who is a specific representation of what the author conceives as a general condition.” [Full transcript of decision] [complete Howl] (BG, see April 2, 1958; FS, see Nov 1)

Beatles not breaking up
October 3, 1966: The Beatles' manager Brian Epstein, recently released from hospitalization, denied reports that Paul McCartney was leaving the group. There had been much press speculation during the latter part of 1966 that The Beatles were splitting up. Each of the four members had pursued outside interests after their final concert, with John Lennon filming How I Won The War in Germany and Spain, George Harrison visiting India, and McCartney and Ringo Starr busying themselves in England. Epstein also revealed that Lennon was appearing as Private Gripweed in Richard Lester's film, and that McCartney was composing the music for another movie entitled Wedlocked, or All In Good Time. (see Oct 16)
Woody Guthrie

October 3 Peace Love Activism

October 3, 1967: Woody Guthrie died of complications of Huntington's disease.  NYT obit. (see Oct 6)
Fifth Big Sur Folk Festival

October 3 Peace Love Activism

October 3, 1968: The Fifth Big Sur Folk Festival (Big Sur, see Sept 14 – 15, 1969; Festival, see Oct 26 & 27)
  • Joan Baez
  • Judy Collins
  • Mimi Fariña
  • Arlo Guthrie
  • Charles River Valley Boys
 Seventh Big Sur Folk Festival

October 3 Peace Love Activism

October 3, 1970 – The Seventh Big Sur Folk Festival (held at the Monterey County Fairgrounds) (see Sept 25, 1971)
1:00 pm Concert:
Beach Boys
John Phillips
Joan Baez
Merry Clayton and Love Ltd.Kris Kristofferson (with Chris Gantry and Vince Matthews)
John Hartford
8:00 pm Concert:
Beach Boys
John Phillips
Linda Ronstadt, with Swamp Water
Mimi Fariña & Tom Jans
Mark Spoelstra
Country Joe McDonald
Tom Ghent
Joan Baez

Nuclear/Chemical News

 

October 3, 1952:  the United Kingdom successfully tested its atomic bomb. The test made the UK the world's third nuclear power. (see Oct 13)
October 3 Peace Love Activism

US Labor History

United Auto Workers
October 3, 1961: the United Auto Workers (UAW) union went on strike at Ford plants across the country to win higher wages and better benefits for its members. It was the first company-wide strike since Ford had agreed to a collective-bargaining deal in 1941. (see January 17, 1962)
Major League Umpires Association
October 3, 1970: baseball umpires strike for recognition of their newly-formed Major League Umpires Association, win after one day. (see Dec 29)
Nissan plant
October 3, 2001: the United Automobile Workers lost an election to represent the workers in a Nissan plant in Smyrna, Tennessee. It was one of a series of defeats in attempts to organize the plants of foreign car makers in the U.S. UAW membership continued to slide. (see March 12, 2004)

Immigration History

October 3, 1965: President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. The Act ordered elimination of the national origins quota system established in 1882 in favor of a worldwide quota blind to national origin. Pushed by the American families of European immigrants who wanted to bring relatives over, the Act replaced the nation's tightly controlled, country-of-origin immigration system with a process that divided visas equally between all countries, giving preference to immigrants with advanced skills and education or with family ties to U.S. citizens.

As a result of the Act, the USA, a country that was almost entirely native-born in  1965 changed with a significant foreign-born population; demographic diversity has spread to every region, expanding a black-and-white racial paradigm into a multicolored one. Americans have gleefully adopted musical genres and foods that have immigrant origins, while remaining conflicted and uneasy politically over who's here, legally and not. (see June 15, 1982)

BLACK HISTORY

Frank Robinson
October 3 Peace Love Activism

 

October 3, 1974: the Cleveland Indians hired Frank Robinson as major league baseball's first black manager. (see Oct 30
Medgar Evers assassination
October 3, 1991: a Federal judge in Chattanooga, Tenn., refused to block the extradition of Byron de la Beckwith, sending him back to Mississippi for a third trial in the 1963 slaying of the civil rights leader Medgar Evers. (NYT article) (Evers, see November 13)

Irish Troubles

October 3, 1981:  those Republican prisoners who had still been refusing food decided to end their hunger strike. At this stage in the protest six prisoners were on hunger strike. The prisoners took their decision when it became clear that each of their families would ask for medical intervention to save their lives. (see Oct 6)

Feminism

The League of Women Voters
October 3 Peace Love Activism
October 3, 1988: after The League of Women Voters had sponsored the Presidential debates in 1976, 1980 and 1984, its 14 trustees voted unanimously to pull out of the debates. League President Nancy M. Neuman issued a press release condemning the demands of the major candidates' campaigns:  The League of Women Voters is withdrawing sponsorship of the presidential debates...because the demands of the two campaign organizations would perpetrate a fraud on the American voter. It has become clear to us that the candidates' organizations aim to add debates to their list of campaign-trail charades devoid of substance, spontaneity and answers to tough questions. The League has no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the American public. (see Feb 11, 1989)  NYT article
The Vagina Monologues

October 3 Peace Love Activism

October 3, 1996: The Vagina Monologues was first performed at HERE Arts Center in Soho, New York. Written and originally performed by Eve Ensler, the play is a one-woman show based on a series of interviews Ensler conducted with a diverse group of women who talked freely about womanhood, sex, and their vaginas. (NYT article) (see January 23, 1997)

October 3, 2008, George. Bush signed the revised Emergency Economic Stabilization Act creating a 700 billion dollar Treasury fund to purchase failing bank assets.

October 3 Peace Love Activism,  October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, October 3 Peace Love Activism, 

Please follow and like us: