Tag Archives: Spiro Agnew

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13 Peace Love Activism

Women’s Health

Margaret Sanger
November 13, 1921,  Birth Control: the first national birth control conference in the U.S. (see Nov 11) was scheduled to end with an event featuring several speakers, but it was abruptly ended when New York City police intervened and removed Margaret Sanger and one other speaker from the stage. Sanger was arrested on charges of disorderly conduct. The New York Time's article headline was: A mass meeting to discuss "Birth Control: Is It Moral?" was broken up by the police at the Town Hall last night. Hundreds of men and women, many socially prominent, derided the police and urged the speakers to defy the order not to speak. (NYT article) (see Nov 18)

Black History

Scottboro Travesty
November 13, 1935: Creed Conyer becomes the first post-Reconstruction black person to sit on an Alabama grand jury in the remanded case. (see Scottsboro Travesty for full story)
Hansberry v. Lee
November 13 Peace Love Activism
Whites only housing
November 13, 1940: the US Supreme Court ruled in Hansberry v. Lee that whites cannot bar African Americans from white neighborhoods. (University of North Carolina site)
US Involvement in World War II
1941 – 1945: African-American soldiers played a significant role in World War II. More than half a million served in Europe. Despite the numbers they faced racial discrimination: prior to the war the military maintained a racially segregated force. In studies by the military, blacks were often classified as unfit for combat and were not allowed on the front lines. They were mostly given support duties, and were not allowed in units with white soldiers.

That changed in 1941, when pressure from African-American civil rights leaders convinced the government to set up all-black combat units, as experiments. They were designed to see if African-American soldiers could perform military tasks on the same level as white soldiers. (BH, see Jan 14)
Browder v. Gayle
November 13 Peace Love Activism
le
November 13, 1956: the US Supreme Court declined the appeal of a US District Court ruling in Browder v. Gayle that had declared unconstitutional Alabama's state and local laws requiring segregation on buses, thereby ending the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Court affirmed a ruling by a three-judge Federal court that held the challenged statutes "violate the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States." (BH, see Dec 4; MBB, see Dec 19)
Medgar Evers
November 13, 1991: Jackson, Miss. Judge L. Breland Hilburn of Hinds County Circuit Court denied bond to Byron De La Beckwith and ordered him to remain in jail pending his third murder trial in the 1963 slaying of the civil rights leader Medgar Evers. (see August 4, 1992)

Cold War

Mrs White bans Communist Robin Hood
November 13 Peace Love Activism
Obama as Robin Hood
November 13, 1953: Mrs. Thomas J. White of the Indiana Textbook Commission, called for the removal of references to the book Robin Hood from textbooks used by the state's schools. Mrs. Young claimed that there was "a Communist directive in education now to stress the story of Robin Hood because he robbed the rich and gave it to the poor. That's the Communist line. It's just a smearing of law and order and anything that disrupts law and order is their meat." She went on to attack Quakers because they "don't believe in fighting wars." This philosophy, she argued, played into communist hands. (Mrs Thomas White's anti-Robin Hood campaign)
Get That Communist, Joe
In 1954: the Kavaliers sang “Get That Communist, Joe” in which they poked fun at McCarthy’s passion to find Communists everywhere.  (see Jan 8)
Joe, come here a minute

I get a red hot tip for you, Joe

See that guy with the red suspenders

Driving that car with the bright red fenders

I know he’s one of those heavy spenders

Get that Communist Joe

He’s fillin’ my gal with propaganda

And I’m scared she will meander

Don’t want to take a chance that he’ll land her

Get that Communist Joe

He’s a most revolting character

And the fellas hate him so

But with the girls this character

Is a Comrade Romeo

Since my love he’s sabotaging

And the law he has been dodging

Give him what he deserves, jailhouse lodging

Get that Communist Joe (Get that Shmo, Joe)

Fourth Amendment, United States v. Jeffers

November 13, 1951: United States v Jeffers. Without a warrant, two police officers had entered a District of Columbia hotel room rented to the aunts of Anthony Jeffers when neither they nor Jeffers were present. The police searched the room and seized 19 bottles of cocaine and one bottle of codeine. Jeffers claimed ownership of the contraband and was charged and convicted of violating narcotics laws in a District Court despite his motion to suppress the evidence seized without a warrant as a violation of the Fourth Amendment. The Court of Appeals reversed the conviction and the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case.

In affirming the ruling of the Court of Appeals, Justice Clark held that the warrantless seizure did violate the Fourth Amendment and that the narcotics should have been excluded as evidence at Jeffers trial. Justice Clark wrote "The search and seizure were not incident to a valid arrest; and there were no exceptional circumstances to justify their being made without a warrant."

The Government had argued in this case that no property rights within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment existed in the seized narcotics because they were contraband as declared by Congress in 26 U.S.C. 3116. Justice Clark dismissed their argument, holding that, for purposes of the exclusionary rule, it was property and that Jeffers was entitled to motion to have it suppressed as evidence at trial but that, because it was contraband, he was not entitled to have it returned to him. (Unlawful evidence) (see January 2, 1952)
see November 13 Music et al for more
The Beatles
November 13, 1964: CBS TV shows a 50-minute documentary, “What’s Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A.,” filmed by Albert Maysles, covering the Beatles U.S. tour and other activities that year. (see Nov 23)
Sound of Music
November 13 –26, 1965, the Sound of Music soundtrack is the Billboard #1 album.
Yellow Submarine
November 13, 1968: US release of Yellow Submarine movie. (see Nov 21)

Vietnam

Spiro T. Agnew

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1968: speaking in Des Moines, Iowa, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew accused network television news departments of bias and distortion, and urged viewers to lodge complaints. (see Dec 31)
March Against Death

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1969: in Washington, as a prelude to the second moratorium against the war scheduled for the following weekend, protesters staged a symbolic "March Against Death." The march began at 6 p.m. and drew over 45,000 participants, each with a placard bearing the name of a soldier who had died in Vietnam. The marchers began at Arlington National Cemetery and continued past the White House, where they called out the names of the dead. The march lasted for two days and nights. This demonstration and the moratorium that followed did not produce a change in official policy--although President Nixon was deeply angered by the protests, he publicly feigned indifference and they had no impact on his prosecution of the war. (NYT article) (see Nov 15)
Vietnam Veterans Memorial

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1982: the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. (NYT article on memorial) (see May 7, 1984)
November 13 Peace Love Activism

TERRORISM

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1995: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a car bomb exploded at the U.S. military headquarters, killing 5 U.S. military servicemen. From the New York Times, More than 20 American investigators and hundreds of Saudi security officials searched the rubble of an American-run military training center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia today, looking for clues to the bombing that killed six people, including five Americans. (NYT article)(see June 25, 1996)

Sexual Abuse of Children

November 13, 2002:  Roman Catholic activists from the Survivors First group launch an online database listing 573 US priests accused of involvement in pedophilia since 1996, later dropping 100 of the names. (see Dec 3)

Stop and Frisk Policy

November 13, 2013: a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan refused to reconsider its order removing federal Judge Shira Scheindlin from court cases challenging the New York Police Department's stop-and-frisk policy. Scheindlin’s attorney, Burt Neuborne, had filed papers asking the panel to reconsider the order and saying the appeals judges had offended due process by ousting her without letting her defend herself. The panel denied Neuborne's request, saying it lacked a procedural basis. "We know of no precedent suggesting that a district judge has standing before an appellate court to protest reassignment of a case," the judges ruled. (S & F, see Nov 14; ruling, see Nov 22)

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Monday 19 October

emma goldman 1890October 19, 1890, Anarchism in the US and Emma Goldman :  Goldman (age 21) spoke in Baltimore to members of the International Working People's Association in the afternoon. She later spoke in German to the Workers' Educational Society at Canmakers' Hall. Michael Cohn and William Harvey also speak. This is the first lecture by Goldman to be reported in the mainstream press.

lucy burnsOctober 1917, Feminism & Voting Rights: Lucy Burns, inspired by several Socialist Party suffrage prisoners, led a campaign in prison demanding suffragists be treated as political prisoners; she threatened a hunger strike if the demand was not met. The petition was secretly circulated among inmates, smuggled out, and presented to commissioners of District of Columbia. Every woman signing petition put in solitary confinement.

 

in October 1926, Anarchism in the US and Emma Goldman: after being deported to Russia in 1919 (and becoming disillusioned there) Goldman moved to Great Britain  and later marrying a British citizen, With British citizenship, Goldman sailed for Canada to lecture; its proximity to the US rekindled her hope for readmission to the U.S.

 

MLK arrestedOctober 19, 1960, BLACK HISTORY &  MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR: King was arrested along with students, eventually numbering 280, after conducting mass sit-ins at Rich’s Department Store and other Atlanta stores. The others were freed, but the judge sentenced King to four months in prison. Legal efforts secured his release after eight days. A boycott of the store followed, and by the fall of 1961, Rich’s began to desegregate.

 

wed am s & G

October 19, 1964: Simon & Garfunkel released Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. Initially a flop, but after release of their second album, Sounds of Silence in 1966, it hit #30 on the Billboard charts.


agnew
October 19, 1969, Vietnam: Vice President Spiro T. Agnew referred to anti-Vietnam War protesters "an effete corps of impudent snobs."

 

October 19, 1973: after President Nixon requested Congress appropriate $2.2 billion in emergency aid for Israel,  Libya, Saudi Arabia and other Arab states proclaim an embargo on oil exports to the United States.

 

An Iranian command and control platform is set afire after being shelled by four US Navy destroyers. The shelling is a response to a recent Iranian missile attack on a reflagged Kuwaiti super tanker.

October 19, 1987, TERRORISM: two U.S. warships shelled an Iranian oil platform in the Persian Gulf in response to Iran's Silkworm missile attack on the U.S. flagged ship MV Sea Isle City. (click → NYT article)

 

October 19, 2009, Marijuana:  the Department of Justice issued a memo, known subsequently as the Ogden memo, to "provide clarification and guidance to federal prosecutors in States that have enacted laws authorizing the medical use of marijuana."  In an effort to make the most efficient use of limited resources, the DOJ announced that prosecutorial priorities should not target "individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana." Specifically, individuals with cancer or other serious illnesses who use medical marijuana and the caregivers who provide the medical marijuana in accordance with state law should not be the focus of federal prosecution. The memo clarified that "prosecution of commercial enterprises that unlawfully market and sell marijuana for profit continues to be an enforcement priority." It is also explicitly stated that the memo "does not 'legalize' marijuana or provide a legal defense to a violation of federal law." (click → NYT article)

 

October 19, 2010, LGBT: US Federal Judge struck down the appeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell by the Department of Justice. The US Military begins accepting applications for gay service members. Don't ask, don't tell temporarily ends. (click → NYT article)
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October 10 Peace Love Activism

October 10 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Celia
October 10, 1855: an investigation into Robert Newsom’s disappearance led authorities to question Celia until she admitted to the act. Missouri law at the time allowed a woman who believed she was in “imminent danger of forced sexual intercourse” to be acquitted on a self-defense theory. However, the judge in Celia’s case did not give such an instruction to the jury because, in his view, she was a slave with no right to refuse her “master.”

The jury convicted Celia of first degree murder on October 10, 1855. (see Slave Celia for full story; BH, see "In May" 1856)
Octavius Catto

October 10 Peace Love Activism

October 10, 1871: Frank Kelly assassinated Octavius Catto, a 32-year-old educator and civil rights activist, during an election day uprising in Philadelphia. Kelly, was never tried for murder. Catto’s headstone remembers him as “the forgotten hero.” (see Oct 12)
Autherine Lucy
October 10 Peace Love Activism
Autherine Lucy
October 10, 1955: in Lucy et al v ADAMS, Dean of Admissions, University of Alabama, the Supreme Court upheld the lower court’s decision to admit Autherine Lucy and Pollie Ann Meyers. Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote for the majority, The injunction which the District Court issued in this case, but suspended pending appeal to the Court of Appeals, is reinstated to the extent that it enjoins and restrains the respondent and others designated from denying these petitioners, solely on account of their race or color, the right to enroll in the University of Alabama and pursue courses of study there. The motion is denied. (BH, see Oct 19; U of A, see Feb 2, 1956)
Lurleen B. Wallace Award

 

October 10, 1996: former Alabama Governor Wallace presented the Lurleen B. Wallace Award for Courage, named for his late wife, to Autherine Lucy. He told her that he made a mistake 33 years earlier and that he admired her. They discussed forgiveness.(CNN story) (BH, see May 16, 1997; U of A, see May 19, 1997)
Komla Agbeli Gbedemah
October 10, 1957: in the conclusion to an extremely embarrassing situation, President Dwight D. Eisenhower offered his apologies to Ghanian Finance Minister, Komla Agbeli Gbedemah, who had been refused service at a restaurant in Dover, Delaware. It was one of the first of many such incidents in which African diplomats were confronted with racial segregation in the United States.  (NYT article) (see Feb 20)
MARTIN LUTHER KING
October 10, 1963: at the request of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy authorized the FBI to wiretap the telephones of Martin Luther King Jr. Hoover hoped to prove King was under the influence of the Communist Party but failed. (BH, see Oct 11; MLK, see Oct 15)
Duluth, MN lynching

October 10 Peace Love Activism

October 10, 2003: the June 15, 1920 Duluth, MN lynching was commemorated by dedicating a plaza including three seven-foot-tall bronze statues to the three men who were killed. The statues were part of a memorial across the street from the site of the lynchings. The Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial was designed and sculpted by Carla J. Stetson, in collaboration with editor and writer Anthony Peyton-Porter.October 10 Peace Love Activism
At the memorial's opening, thousands of citizens from Duluth and surrounding communities gathered for a ceremony. The final speaker at the ceremony was Warren Read, the great-grandson of one of the most prominent leaders of the lynch mob:

It was a long held family secret, and its deeply buried shame was brought to the surface and unraveled. We will never know the destinies and legacies these men would have chosen for themselves if they had been allowed to make that choice. But I know this: their existence, however brief and cruelly interrupted, is forever woven into the fabric of my own life. My son will continue to be raised in an environment of tolerance, understanding and humility, now with even more pertinence than before." (see April 22, 2004)
Medgar Evers

October 10 Peace Love Activism

October 10, 2009: Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of the slain civil rights pioneer Medgar Evers, heard Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, a former Mississippi governor, announce that he was naming a new Navy supply ship for her husband. She said: “I think of those who will serve on this ship and those who will see it in different parts of the world. And perhaps they, too, will come to know who Medgar Evers was and what he stood for.” (see Oct 28)
BLACK & SHOT
October 10, 2017: according to their lawyer, Officers Garrett E. Miller and Edward M. Nero, the two police officers involved in the fatal arrest of Freddie Gray (see April 19, 2015) agreed to face modest internal discipline, bringing an end to the proceedings against them two and a half years after Gray’s death in police custody prompted violent protests in Baltimore and fueled a national debate over the way the police treat minorities.

According to Michael Davey, a lawyer for their police union, Miller and Nero agreed to face “minor disciplinary action. Davey did not specify their punishment nor the allegations they faced. He said the move ensures they can “continue their careers with the Baltimore Police Department.”

October 19 Music et al

Sonny Rollins
In 1958: Sonny Rollins released Freedom Suite in, although his record company changed the name to Shadow Waltz. In its liner notes, Rollins wrote, “How ironic that the Negro, who more than any other people can claim America’s culture as his own, is being persecuted and repressed.” (see Feb 20)
 
Larry Verne
October 10 Peace Love ActivismOctober 10 – 16, 1960: “Mr. Custer” by Larry Verne #1 Billboard Hot 100.

October 10, 1966, Teenage Culture: the Monkees released  their first album, The Monkees. (see Nov 12)

October 10 Peace Love Activism

INDEPENDENCE DAY

October 10, 1970: Fiji independent of the United Kingdom (see March 26, 1971)

LGTBQ

see Baker v Nelson for more

October 10 Peace Love Activism

October 10, 1972: The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed Baker v. Nelson, one of three cases brought by same-sex couples. challenging the denial of marriage. A Minnesota couple, Richard Baker and James Michael McConnell, were denied a marriage license by the Hennepin County District Court's clerk on May 18, 1970. Their initial trial court dismissed their claim and affirmed that the clerk could refuse gay couples a marriage license. (NYT article) (see January 1, 1973) 
Kerrigan v. Commissioner of Public Health
October 10, 2008, LGBTQ: The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in Kerrigan v. Commissioner of Public Health, a case brought by Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, that same-sex couples were entitled to the freedom to marry. The law retroactively takes effect on October 1, allowing all couples the freedom to marry and converting existing civil unions between same-sex couples in the state into marriages.  (see Nov 4)
Idaho
October 10, 2014: the Supreme Court allowed same-sex marriages to proceed in Idaho, lifting a temporary stay issued two days earlier by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy. (LGBTQ, see Oct 12; Nevada LGBTQ, see January 9, 2015)

Watergate Scandal

October 10, 1972: the Washington Post reported that FBI agents had established that the Watergate break-in stemmed from a massive campaign of political spying and sabotage conducted on behalf of the Nixon reelection effort. (see Nov 7)

VP Agnew Scandal

October 10, 1973: Spiro Agnew resigned the vice presidency and appeared in US District Court in Baltimore on the same day to plead nolo contendere to a single federal count of failing to report on his income-tax return $29,500 in income. (NYT article) (see Dec 6)

WAR POWERS ACT

October 10, 1973: Senate approved joint conference committee’s resolution 75 – 20. (see Oct 12)

Sexual Abuse of Children

Sinead O’Connor
October 10, 1992: Sinead O'Connor appeared on Saturday Night Live as a musical guest. She sang an a cappella version of Bob Marley's "War", which she intended as a protest over the sexual abuse in the Roman Catholic Church, by changing the lyric "racism" to "child abuse." She then presented a photo of Pope John Paul II to the camera while singing the word "evil", after which she tore the photo into pieces, said "Fight the real enemy", and threw the pieces towards the camera.  (NYT article) (see “In November”)

Jason BerryOctober 10 Peace Love Activism
In 1992: Jason Berry's Lead Us Not Into Temptation: Catholic Priests and the Sexual Abuse of Children published. In Rev. Andrew M. Greeley's foreword, he describes its content as revealing "what may be the greatest scandal in the history of religion in America and perhaps the most serious crisis Catholicism has faced since the Reformation" (see “In July”)

Native Americans

October 10, 2013: in an emotional statement Dusten Brown, Baby Veronica's biological father, said he and the Cherokee Nation were dropping the legal fight to regain custody of the 4-year-old girl.

 "I know we did everything in our power to keep Veronica home with her family," Brown said in Oklahoma. "Veronica is only 4 years old, but her entire life has been lived in front of the media and the entire world. I cannot bear for [it to continue] any longer.... I love her too much to continue to have her in the spotlight. It is not fair for her to be in front of media at all times," he said. "It was the love for my daughter that finally gave me the strength to accept things that are beyond my control." (see Nov 21)

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