Tag Archives: Space race

November 14 Peace Love Activism

November 14 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

National Women’s Trade Union League

November 14 Peace Love Activism

November 14, 1903: at the AFL convention in Boston, women unionists united to form the National Women's Trade Union League and elect Mary Morton Kehew president and Jane Addams vice-president. The National Women's Trade Union League (WTUL) was established to advocate for improved wages and working conditions for women. (see January 25, 1904) 
Yale University admits women
November 14 Peace Love Activism
Amy Solomon ’73 (center) was the first woman to register as a student in Yale College.
November 14, 1968:  Yale University announced would admit admit women. From the New York Times, "For the first time in its 265-year history Yale University will admit undergraduate women next fall to "enhance its contribution to the generations ahead." (Yale to admit women) (see Nov 22)
Nancy Pelosi minority whip

November 14 Peace Love Activism

November 14, 2002, Feminist Steps: minority whip since 2001, Californian Nancy Pelosi became the first woman elected as Democratic Minority Leader in the U.S. House of Representatives.  The NY Times article began: House Democrats turned to Representative Nancy Pelosi of California today to try to reverse their political fortunes, electing her their leader. She becomes the first woman to head a party in either house of Congress. (Pelosi chosen) (see December 10, 2003)

BLACK HISTORY

Miscegenation
On April 18, 1946: a thirty-two-year-old Navy veteran named Davis Knight married Junie Lee Spradley, a white woman. In June 1948, the state of Mississippi indicted Mr. Knight for violating a law that prohibited “marriage or cohabitation between white persons and those with one-eighth or more Negro or Mongolian blood.” At trial, Mr. Knight insisted that he was white: his wife believed him to be white and his Navy service records listed him as white. Mississippi set out to prove he was black.

The whole case turned on the race of Mr. Knight’s deceased great-grandmother, Rachel; if she was black, Mr. Knight was at least one-eighth black and guilty of the charge. As evidence of Rachel’s race, the State presented several elderly witnesses, including an eighty-nine-year-old white man who testified that Rachel had lived on his father’s plantation and was a “known Negro.”

On December 18, 1948 Mississippi convicted Knight of miscegenation and sentenced him to five years in prison for marrying outside of his race. Knight appealed. 

On November 14, 1949 the  Mississippi State Supreme Court  reversed Knight’s conviction. The Court held that, in Mr. Knight’s particular case, the State had failed to provide sufficient evidence to prove that his grandmother Rachel was fully black, so it had not proved that Mr. Knight was at least one-eighth black.

Though the decision did not strike down the state’s miscegenation law, or prevent future prosecutions of others, many white Mississippians protested the decision, hanging members of the court in effigy. The state’s ban on interracial marriage would stand for nearly two more decades, until the United States Supreme Court’s 1967 decision in Loving v. Virginia struck down remaining anti-miscegenation laws in Mississippi and seventeen other states. 
Jo Ann Robinson
In 1950, Jo Ann Robinson became president of the Women’s Political Council in Montgomery, AL. As president, she began to study the issue of bus segregation, which affected the many blacks who were the majority of riders on the city system. First, members appeared before the City Commission to report abuses on the buses, such as blacks who were first on the bus being required later to give up seats for whites as buses became crowded. The commission acted surprised but did nothing. (BH & Feminism, see March 31)

In 1953 Jo Ann Robinson and other local black leaders met with the three commissioners of Montgomery. Robinson’s group complained that the city did not hire any black bus drivers, said that segregation of seating was unjust, and that bus stops in black neighborhoods were farther apart than in white ones, although blacks were the majority of the riders. The commissioners refused to change anything. 

Robinson and other WPC members met with bus company officials on their own. The segregation issue was deflected, as bus company officials said that segregation was city and state law, but the WPC achieved a small victory as the bus company officials agreed to have the buses stop at every corner in black neighborhoods, as was the practice in white neighborhoods. (BH, see June 8; Feminism, see May 18, 1954; Montgomery, see March 2, 1955)
 Voting Rights

November 14 Peace Love Activism

November 14, 1960: in Gomillion v. Lightfoot, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a redistricting plan enacted by the Alabama legislature, which redrew the boundaries of the City of Tuskegee. The court found that the plan -- which changed the city's shape from a square to a 28-sided border violated the 15th Amendment to the Constitution and was done expressly to exclude black voters from city elections.(Voting Rights, see March 26, 1962)
School Desegregation

November 14

November 14, 1960: 6-year-old Ruby Bridges became the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans.  Bridges was in first-grade when she started attending William Frantz Elementary School as the court-ordered integration of public schools began in New Orleans. Some in the crowd carried a black doll in a baby's casket. Federal marshell Charles Burks and three other marshals escorted the Bridges to and from school for several weeks before local police took over that duty. Eventually the crowds dispersed and she no longer needed protection. Normal Rockwell's cover depicting Ruby Bridges first day at an all-white school.

In 1963 Norman Rockwell depicted a young black girl carrying textbooks and a ruler being led by marshals past a wall marred by a splattered tomato and a scrawled racial epithet.(BH, see Dec 5; SD, see March 27, 1962)
Medgar Evers
November 14, 1964: William L Walter, the district attorney who prosecuted the case against Byron De La Beckwith, announced that Beckwith would not be tried a third time for the murder of Medgar W. Evers unless new evidence is obtained. (BH, see Nov 18; Evers, see January 12, 1966)

November 14 Music et al

November 14 – 20, 1960:  “Georgia On My Mind” by Ray Charles #1 Billboard Hot 100. (see Georgia for much more)

Vietnam

November 14, 1965: the Battle of Ia Drang Valley was the first major battle between regular U.S. and People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) troops. The two-part battle occurred at landing zones X-Ray and Albany in Ia Drang Valley, Central Highlands of South Vietnam. Despite heavy casualties on both sides, both claimed the battle was a victory. The battle was considered essential as it set the blueprint for tactics for both sides. American troops continued to reply on air mobility and artillery fire, while the Viet Cong learned that by quickly engaging their combat forces close to the enemy, they could neutralize American advantages (see Nov 17)

Space Race, Apollo 12

November 14 Peace Love Activism

November 14 - 24, 1969,  Space Race: Apollo 12 took off. Pete Conrad and Alan Bean will collect lunar samples, as well as parts of the unmanned Surveyor 3. From the New York Times, "Three American astronauts were ready tonight to embark tomorrow on man's second voyage to land on the moon, a trip aimed at a more thorough scientific investigation into the origin and nature of the earth's only natural satellite." (click >>> Apollo 12) [the audio clip is the Byrds song, Armstrong, Aldrin, & Collins. I know it's not for Apollo 12, but I like the song and...well...close enough.](see April 11 – 17, 1970)
November 14 Peace Love Activism

Iran hostage crisis

November 14, 1979: President Jimmy Carter issued Executive Order 12170, freezing all Iranian assets in the United States and U.S. banks in response to the hostage crisis. (see Nov 17)

LGBTQ

November 14, 1985: lesbian and gay rights activists held a town hall meeting on this day in New York City. Two weeks later, GLAAD [Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation] was formed. GLAAD gave special focus to changing American culture regarding homosexuality. (see June 30, 1986)

The GLAAD Mission Statement (in part): “GLAAD works with print, broadcast and online news sources to bring people powerful stories from the LGBTQ community that build support for equality. And when news outlets get it wrong, GLAAD is there to respond and advocate for fairness and accuracy.” (see June 30, 1986)
American Catholic Bishops side against gay marriage
November 14, 2015: Catholic Bishops sided with those who conscientiously object to gay marriage and maintain their opposition to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling legalizing gay marriage nationwide. These pro-traditional marriage views were expressed during the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' fall General Assembly meeting, the first meeting for the bishops since the 5-4 Supreme Court ruling in the June 26, 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges. (see Dec 14)

Stop and Frisk

November 14, 2013: New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman analyzed 150,000 arrests that resulted from 2.4 millions stops by the NYPD between 2009 and 2012. About half of the arrests lead to convictions and about a quarter lead to prison sentences, according to the report released. The other half were never prosecuted, dismissed or resulted in adjournments in contemplation of dismissal - a legal term for cases in which a judge allows a case to be dismissed after a probationary period of usually six months to a year. The report also said the stop-and-frisk arrests resulted in a 24 percent incarceration rate.                 

The chief spokesman for the police, John McCarthy, called the analysis "flawed" and said it underestimated the value of the tactic. (see Nov 22)

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November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Race revolt
November 3, 1883: riots occurred in Danville, Va. White conservatives seized control of the local government, killing four African Americans in the process.(BH, see May 4; RR, see November 8, 1898)
Greensboro Massacre
November 3, 1979: five protest marchers were shot and killed by members of the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party. The protest was the culmination of attempts by the Communist Workers Party to organize mostly black industrial workers in the area. Five Klansmen were charged with murder. None were convicted. (NYT article) (see Dec 17)

Carol Moseley Braun

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1992: Carol Moseley Braun, a Democrat from Illinois, became the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Senate. (BH, see Dec 16; Feminism, see Nov 11) (NYT article)

Native Americans

Elk v. Wilkins
November 3, 1884, the question was whether an Indian, born a member of one of the Indian tribes within the US was, merely by reason of their birth within the US, and of their afterward voluntarily separating themselves from the tribe and taking up residence among citizens, a citizen of the US, within the meaning of the first section of the Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution. The Court decided that although “Indian tribes, being within the territorial limits of the United States, were not, strictly speaking, foreign states,” “they were alien nations, distinct political communities,” with whom the United States dealt with through treaties and acts of Congress. Native Americans were not US citizens.(Citizenship, see June 2, 1924; NA, see September 4, 1886)

INDEPENDENCE DAYS

Panama
November 3, 1903: with US assistance and plans to build a canal after independence, Panama became independent from Colombia. (see September 22, 1908)
Dominica
November 3, 1978: Dominica independent of United Kingdom. (see February 22, 1979)

US Labor History

Milk driver strike
November 3, 1921: striking milk drivers dump thousands of gallons of milk on New York City streets. (see Dec 15)
Transit worker strike
November 3, 2009: nearly 5,000 transit workers represented by Transport Workers Union Local 234 begin a strike in Philadelphia over wages, pensions, and benefits. The strike shut down the city’s bus, subway, and trolley service and after six days, a five-year contract deal was reached that provided pay and benefit increases. (see January 22, 2010)

Space Race, Sputnik 2

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1957: Sputnik 2 carried Laika, a female dog, into space. Although the satellite will remain in orbit for 162 days, scientists plan to put Laika to sleep after a week because there is no way to return her to Earth safely. Later reports indicate that Laika died soon after liftoff, from stress and high temperatures inside the capsule. (see Dec 6)
FREE SPEECH
November 3, 1960: an Alabama State Court jury awarded Police Commisioner L.B. Sullivan a libel judgment of $500,000 against The New York Times and four Alabama Negro ministers. (see February 15, 1961) 

November 3 Music et al

November  3 – 16, 1962: “He’s a Rebel” by The Crystals #1 Billboard Hot 100. The first of many Phil Spector produced hits.

Presidential elections

Lyndon B Johnson

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1964: Lyndon Johnson elected president in a landslide over Barry Goldwater. Johnson wins 486-52 in the electoral vote. Residents of the District of Columbia cast their ballots in a presidential election for the first time. (NYT)
Bill Clinton
November 3, 1992: Bill Clinton is elected the 42nd President of the United States. (NYT article)

Vietnam

November 3, 1969: President Nixon addressed the nation on television and radio, asking the "silent majority" to join him in solidarity with the Vietnam War effort, and to support his policies. Vice President Spiro T. Agnew denounces the President's critics as 'an effete corps of impudent snobs' and 'nattering nabobs of negativism'. (see Nov 13)

Feminism

November 3 Peace Love Activism
Bella Abzug
November 3, 1970: representing Manhattan on a feminist and anti-war platform, Bella Abzug, a lawyer specializing in civil rights, won a Congressional seat. (NYT re Bella Abzug) (see Dec 1)
November 3 Peace Love Activism

Symbionese Liberation Army

November 3, 1974: after months without hearing from Patty, Randolph Hearst withdrew his offer of a $50,000 reward for her safe return. (see January 2, 1975)

Iran–Contra Affair

November 3, 1986: the Lebanese magazine Ash-Shiraa reported that the United States had been selling weapons to Iran in secret, in order to secure the release of 7 American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon. (NYT re Iran) (see Nov 19)
Medical Marjuana

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1998, Marijuana: Alaska, Arizona Oregon, Nevada, and Washington legalize medical marijuana. (NYT article) (see July 1999)
Physician-assisted Suicide
November 3, 1998, Michigan voters reject a proposal to legalize physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill. (NYT article)

Sexual Abuse of Children

November 3, 2002: Boston's Cardinal Law apologized for "decisions which led to suffering.” (see Nov 7)
LGBTQ, Gay marriage denied
November 3, 1998: anti-gay proponents succeeded in amending the Hawaii Constitution so as to prevent the courts from ending the exclusion of same-sex couples; under the Amendment, only the legislature could change that discrimination, notwithstanding the Equal Protection Clause. On the same day, anti-gay forces in Alaska pass Ballot Measure 2, which amended the state constitution to restrict marriage to different-sex couples. (NYT article)

LGBT, Gay marriage denied

November 3, 2009: anti-gay forces in Maine pushed through an anti-gay ballot measure to overturn the freedom to marry in the state and restrict marriage to different-sex couples. (NYT article) (see Dec 15)

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October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Marcus Garvey

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 1919: with the goal of deporting Garvey firmly in mind, J Edgar Hoover wrote a memo suggesting that investigators pursue the idea of prosecuting Garvey for fraud, in connection with his Black Star Line activities. (see Oct 14)
Malcolm X
October 11, 1963: at UC Berkeley Herman Blake interviewed Malcolm X  being a Black Muslim, the conditions of Blacks in this country, their relation with white people, and Malcolm X stating  the case for Black separatism. (BH, see Oct 15; MX, see March 8, 1964)
Medgar Evers assassination
October 11, 1973: The Louisiana Ku Klux Klan said it was raising a defense fund for Byron De La Beckwith, who was charged with bringing a bomb into Louisiana. (see January 19, 1974)
Johnnie Mae Chappell

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 2005: the law firm of Spohrer Wilner Maxwell & Matthews, best known for its court wins against tobacco giants, promised to look into the 1964 slaying of black housekeeper Johnnie Mae Chappell by white shooters without charge.

Senior partner Robert Spohrer asked Gov. Jeb Bush and State Attorney Harry Shorstein to reopen the case, appoint a special prosecutor or impanel a grand jury to investigate the slaying.

The attorney also said his office has been in touch with the Southern Poverty Law Center and was looking into filing another lawsuit, although the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear a case last year that accused local detectives of covering up evidence to protect Chappell's killers. (BH, see Oct 13; Chappell, see January 5, 2006)

Second Vatican Council

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 1962:  Pope John XXIII convened an ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church—the first in 92 years. In summoning the ecumenical council—a general meeting of the bishops of the church—the pope hoped to bring spiritual rebirth to Catholicism and cultivate greater unity with the other branches of Christianity. In calling the ecumenical council, he sought a "New Pentecost," a new outpouring of the Holy Spirit. He sought reconciliation for the world's divided Christianity and invited Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Protestant observers to attend the proceedings.  During the Council a papal commission worked on a new marriage statement. The Council would close on December 8, 1965. 

In 1965, that commission on marriage voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the church rescind its ban on artificial contraception, saying that it was not “intrinsically evil” 

Vietnam

October 11, 1963: after considering the report from McNamara and Taylor (Sept 21), Kennedy signed National Security Action Memorandum 263. It planned to transfer responsibility for security in South Vietnam to the ARVN, allowing for the withdrawal of 1,000 US advisors within three months and the bulk of US advisors by late 1965. (see Oct 22)

Space Race

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11 – 12, 1968: After extensive redesign work, Apollo 7, commanded by Wally Schirra (the only astronaut to command Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions) enters earth orbit in the first test of the spacecraft. (see October 25NYT Apollo 7

World Series

October 11 - 16, 1969: NY Mets and the Baltimore Orioles. Mets win in five games to accomplish one of the greatest upsets in Series history, as that particular Orioles squad was considered to be one of the finest ever. The World Series win earned the team the sobriquet "Miracle Mets."
October 11 Peace Love Activism

AIDS

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 1987: hundreds of thousands of activists take part in the National March on Washington to demand that President Ronald Reagan address the AIDS crisis. Although AIDS had been reported first in 1981, it was not until the end of his presidency that Reagan spoke publicly about the epidemic. (NYT article) (see May – June 1988)

Feminism

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 1991: University of Oklahoma Law Professor Anita F. Hill testified before a Senate Judiciary Committee that conservative Federal Appeals Court Judge and Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her when she was employed as his personal assistant. Three days of unprecedented televised Senate Judiciary Committee hearings follow the charges. Senators Arlen Specter, Alan Simpson and Orrin Hatch accuse Hill of falsifying the events, and her credibility was questioned because her allegations did not come until nine years after the alleged acts took place.

Thomas reappeared before the panel to denounce the proceedings as a "high-tech lynching." (NYT article) (see Oct  23)

Environmental Issues

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 2000: 250 million US gallons  of coal sludge spill in Martin County, Kentucky (considered a greater environmental disaster than the Exxon Valdez oil spill). (see February 2, 2007)

TERRORISM

October 11 Peace Love Activism

October 11, 2011: the trial of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, accused of trying to blow up a commercial airliner with a bomb sewed into his underwear ended  just a day after it had begun, when he abruptly announced that he would plead guilty to all of the federal counts against him. (see February 16, 2012)

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