Tag Archives: Native Americans

November 8 Peace Love Activism

November 8 Peace Love Activism

November 8 Presidential Elections

Before 1845, states determined Election Day, but since then Election Day has officially been the first Tuesday after the first Monday. Thus November 8 is the latest that election day can be.  

By why Tuesday? In the 19th century most people still lived on farms and had to travel to vote. Traveling on Sunday was "forbidden" for many Christians and Wednesday was typically market day. Tuesday it was. 

We have had six November 8 presidential elections since then:
1864 Abraham Lincoln defeated George B. McClellan
1892 Grover Cleveland defeated Benjamin Harrison
1904 Theodore Roosevelt defeated Alton B. Parker
1932 Franklin D Roosevelt defeated Herbert Hoover
1960 John F Kennedy defeated Richard M Nixon
1988 George H W Bush defeated Michael Dukakis

Technological Milestone

November 8, 1895: physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen became the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible. Rontgen's discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated screen. He dubbed the rays that caused this glow X-rays because of their unknown nature. (see Dec 28)

Black History

Domestic terrorism
November 8 Peace Love Activism
Report of Willmington race riot from The New York Herald
November 8, 1898: in two days of racial violence, a mob of whites, led by some of Wilmington NC’s most respected and influential citizens, destroyed the state's only daily African American newspaper. Coroner reports confirmed nine blacks were killed; some estimate hundreds died. Scores of others were driven from their homes.

Originally described as a race riot, it is now observed as a coup d'etat with insurgents having overthrown the legitimately elected local government, the only such event in US history.

Two days after the election of a Fusionist white Mayor and biracial city council, Democratic Party white supremacists illegally seized power from the elected government. More than 1500 white men participated in an attack on the black newspaper, burning down the building. They ran officials and community leaders out of the city, and killed many blacks in widespread attacks, but especially destroyed the Brooklyn neighborhood. They took photographs of each other during the events. The Wilmington Light Infantry and federal Naval Reserves, told to quell the riot, used rapid-fire weapons and killed several black men in the Brooklyn neighborhood. Both black and white residents later appealed for help after the riot to President William McKinley, who did not respond. More than 2,000 blacks left the city permanently, turning it from a black-majority to a white-majority city. (BH, see June 4, 1899; RR, see August 14, 1908)
Edward W. Brooke
November 8, 1965: Edward W. Brooke (R-Massachusetts) became the first African American elected to Senate. (see Nov 30)
Harold Washington
November 8, 1983: Harold Washington elected first African American mayor of Chicago. (see  Dec 9)

ADA

Franklin D. Roosevelt
November 8, 1932: Franklin D. Roosevelt elected president. After he helped found the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (now known as the March of Dimes). His leadership in this organization is one reason he is commemorated on the dime.
League for the Physically Handicapped
In 1935, to protest the fact that their requests for employment with the Works Progress Administration (WPA) have been stamped 'PH' (physically handicapped), 300 members of the League for the Physically Handicapped stage a nine-day sit in at the Home Relief Bureau of New York City. Eventually, they help secure several thousand jobs nationwide. The League of the Physically Handicapped is accepted as the first organization of people with disabilities by people with disabilities. (see August 14, 1935)
Mental Health, Americans with Disabilities
November 8, 2013: the Obama administration required insurers to cover care for mental health and addiction just like physical illnesses when it issued regulations defining parity in benefits and treatment. (NYT article) (see December 19, 2014)

Vietnam

November 8, 1964: the US Government recognized the new South Vietnam government. (Vietnam, see Nov 15; South Vietnam leadership, see June 14, 1965)

November 8 Music et al

Cynthia Lennon
November 8, 1968: Cynthia Lennon granted divorce from John. (see Nov 11)
Laura Nyro

November 8 Peace Love Activism

 

November 8 – 28, 1969: “Wedding Bell Blues” by The Fifth Dimension #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. "Laura Nyro wrote and recorded the  song in 1966. The harmonica in the beginning of hers sounds like somebody's cell phone went off during the recording. Guess not, eh?

Cultural Milestone

November 8 Peace Love Activism

November 8, 1972: the premium cable TV network HBO (Home Box Office) made its debut. The first program and film broadcast on the channel, the 1971 movie Sometimes a Great Notion. It  was transmitted that evening to 325 Service Electric subscribers in Wilkes-Barre (a plaque commemorating this event is located at Public Square in downtown Wilkes-Barre). Home Box Office broadcast its first sports event immediately after the film: an NHL game between the New York Rangers and the Vancouver Canucks from Madison Square Garden. (see February 9, 1973)

LGBTQ

Harvey Milk

November 8 Peace Love Activism

November 8, 1977, LGBT: Harvey Milk won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and was responsible for introducing a gay rights ordinance protecting gays and lesbians from being fired from their jobs. Milk also led a successful campaign against Proposition 6, an initiative forbidding homosexual teachers. (see November 8, 1977
Proposition 2
November 8, 2005: Proposition 2 passed in Texas, constitutionally excluding same-sex couples from marriage(Election results article from NYT) (see January 20, 2006)
November 8 Peace Love Activism
Representatives Tammy Baldwin and Barney Frank at a news conference
November 8, 2007, LGBT: the House of Representatives approved a bill ensuring equal rights in the workplace for gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals. (NYT article)(see February 1, 2008)

Native Americans

November 8, 1978: The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA) enacted. It governed jurisdiction over the removal of Native American children from their families.

The ICWA was enacted because of the high removal rate of Indian children from their traditional homes and essentially from Indian culture as a whole. Before enactment, as many as 25 to 35 percent of all Indian children were being removed from their Indian homes and placed in non-Indian homes, with presumably the absence of Indian culture. In some cases, the Bureau of Indian Affairs paid the states to remove Indian children and to place them with non-Indian families and religious groups.

As Louis La Rose (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska) testified: "I think the cruelest trick that the white man has ever done to Indian children is to take them into adoption court, erase all of their records and send them off to some nebulous family ... residing in a white community and he goes back to the reservation and he has absolutely no idea who his relatives are, and they effectively make him a non-person and I think ... they destroy him." (click for more information >>> ICWA) (Native Americans, see July 2, 1979; Supreme Court decision re the ICWA, see June 25, 2013)
November 8 Peace Love Activism

Irish Troubles

November 8, 1987:  a bomb planted by the Irish Republican Army exploded as crowds gathered in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, for a ceremony honoring Britain's war dead, killing 11 people. (see March 16, 1988)

Assisted suicide, Oregon

November 8 Peace Love Activism

November 8, 1994: Oregon became the first state to legalize assisted suicide when voters passed a Death with Dignity Act, but legal appeals kept the law from taking effect until 1997. (NYT article) (see Nov 26)

Iraq War II

November 8, 2006:  Donald Rumsfeld announced he would resign as Secretary of Defense. (see Nov 9)

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November 6 Peace Love Activism

November 6 Peace Love Activism

History fills every day. In 1917, suffragists finally got a foothold in New York when women there won the right to vote. Three years later, women voted nationally for the first time. The US government offered citizenship to Native American veterans.Few of us have heard of Rudolph Anderson, but he was the only US fatality during the Cuban Missile Crisis. And when the Symbionese Liberation Army first struck, we'd never heard that name, either. 

Feminism

Voting Rights
November 6, 1917:  the woman suffrage referendum succeeded in New York. New York was the first eastern state to grant women the vote. (NYT sufferage article) (see Nov 10)

and exactly three years later…

November 6 Peace Love Activism
Women vote for first time nationally
November 6, 1920:  following the ratification of the 19th amendment on August 18, 1920, women across entire United States vote for first time. In Yoncalla, Oregon, woman won every council seat. (Women vote for first time) (Feminism, see Nov 23, 1921; VR, see Feb 27, 1922)
Nancy Pelosi
November 6, 2006: mid-term elections resulted in the Democrats gaining control of both houses of Congress; Nancy Pelosi becomes the first female Speaker of the House. (see Jan 4, 2007)

Native Americans

1919 American Indian Citizenship Act

 

November 6 Peace Love Activism
Boney Rabbit, Cecil Gallamore, Stacy Sitting Hawk, Hezekiah Chebahtah, Owen Yackeyyonney and Anton Menteg. Camp Mills, Long Island, New York. March 31, 1919. Dixon noted Menteg, an Aleut from Alaska, was known for his bugle skills, being able to play everything from military signals to ragtime. The other men represent several different tribes: Cherokee (Rabbit), Choctaw (Gallamore), Southern Cheyenne (Sitting Hawk) and Comanche (Chebahtah and Yackeyyonney). All were U.S. citizens, not typically the case with Native American servicemen at the time.
Native Americans were not considered citizens of the United States despite the obvious fact that they were born and lived here for thousands of years before there even was a United States. Native Americans fought in support of US troops in every was. On November 6, 1919, Congress enacted the 1919 American Indian Citizenship Act, but it did not grant automatic citizenship to American Indian veterans who had received an honorable discharge. The Act merely authorized those American Indian veterans who wanted to become American citizens to apply for and be granted citizenship. Few Indians actually followed through on the process.

"BE IT ENACTED . . . that every American Indian who served in the Military or Naval Establishments of the United States during the war against the Imperial German Government, and who has received or who shall hereafter receive an honorable discharge, if not now a citizen and if he so desires, shall, on proof of such discharge and after proper identification before a court of competent jurisdiction, and without other examination except as prescribed by said court, be granted full citizenship with all the privileges pertaining thereto, without in any manner impairing or otherwise affecting the property rights, individuals or tribal, of any such Indian or his interest in tribal or other Indian property."

(click for a longer article on citizenship and Native Americans around this time >>> Daily Kos) (see June 2, 1924)

US Labor History

November 6, 1922: a coal mine explosion in Spangler, Pa., kills 79. The mine had been rated gaseous in 1918, but at the insistence of new operators it was rated as non-gaseous even though miners had been burned by gas on at least four occasions (see April 2, 1923)

Cold War

McCarthyism/the KKK/Kickbacks
November 6, 1946: the Republican Party won a majority in both the House and Senate, ushering in a major revival of institutional anticommunist activity, publicly spearheaded by the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Joe McCarthy won election to the U.S. Senate from Wisconsin. 

In 1947,the House on Un-American Activities decided not to investigate the Ku Klux Klan’s violent actions. HUAC’s chief counsel, Ernest Adamson, announced: "The committee has decided that it lacks sufficient data on which to base a probe," HUAC member John Rankin added: "After all, the KKK is an old American institution.” 

It was reported that grom 1947 – 1949 Senator Joe McCarthy had accepted kickbacks from Pepsi Cola totaling $20,000 in exchange for helping Pepsi to circumvent the post-war sugar rationing.   He also received another $10,000 from entrepreneurs in the pre-fabricated housing industry.  Shortly thereafter, McCarthy joined the Senate Housing Committee and went on the road to speak out against public housing for veterans, extolling the benefits of the pre-fabricated home and offering it as an alternative. (FH, see May 3, 1948: RS, see Feb 17)
Rudolph Anderson
November 6, 1962: during the Cuban Missile Crisis on October 27, US Air Force pilot Rudolph Anderson took off in a U-2F (spy plane) from McCoy Air Force Base in Orlando Florida. A few hours into his mission, he was shot down by a Soviet-supplied surface-to-air missile near Banes, Cuba. Anderson was killed when shrapnel from the exploding proximity warhead punctured his pressure suit causing it to decompress at high altitude.
November 6 Peace Love Activism
Major Rudolph Anderson’s wrecked U-2 jet
On October 31, Acting United Nations Secretary U Thant returned from a visit with Premier Fidel Castro and announced that Anderson was dead.
November 6 Peace Love Activism November 6 Peace Love Activism
On this date, Rudolph Anderson's body interred in Greenville, South Carolina at Woodlawn Memorial Park. Cold War, see Dec 15 – March 8, 1963)
Turn! Turn! Turn!
In 1962, Pete Seeger used verses from the Bible’s Book of Ecclesiastes to write song “Turn! Turn! Turn!” which promoted peaceful aims. (see Dec 23)

Calvin Graham

November 6, 1950: Graham enlisted in the US Marine Corps. His "birth certificate" indicated he was 17. He was actually 12. (see Calvin Graham for full story)

Presidential Elections

Dwight D Eisenhower
November 6, 1956, Dwight D Eisenhower defeated Adlai Stevenson and re-elected President.
Ronald Reagan
November 6, 1984: Ronald Reagan defeated Walter F. Mondale with 59% of the popular vote, the highest since Richard Nixon's 61% victory in 1972. Reagan carries 49 states in the electoral college; Mondale wins only his home state of Minnesota by a mere 3,761 vote margin and the District of Columbia.; Wilson Goode elected first African American mayor of Philadelphia.
Barak Obama
November 6, 2012, Barak Obama re-elected President. A protest at the University of Mississippi against his re-election grew into crowd of about 400 people with shouted racial slurs. Two people were arrested on minor charges. The university said that the gathering at the student union began late Tuesday night with about 30 to 40 students, but grew within 20 minutes as word spread. Some students chanted political slogans while others used derogatory racial statements and profanity, the statement said.

see November 6 Music et al for more

Big Bad John
November 6 – December 10, 1961: “Big Bad John” by Jimmy Dean #1 Billboard Hot 100.
Rock Venues
November 6, 1965:  promoter Bill Graham put on his first show, a benefit for the radical San Francisco Mime Troupe at the Calliope Warehouse in San Francisco. He did it to raise money for a legal defense fund for a member of the troupe who been arrested a few days earlier. The troupe's offices were in the warehouse and they figured they could hold about 400 - 500 people. The donation to get in was "at least $1.00". About 4000 people showed up.

For entertainment, Bill hired a band who also rehearsed in the same warehouse. The band was the Jefferson Airplane. They played 3 songs. Also on the bill were The Fugs and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. (see Dec 10)
Get Off My Cloud
November 6 – 19, 1965, “Get Off My Cloud” by the Rolling Stones #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.
see Raccoon Creek Rock Festival for more
November 6 - 8, 1969: Livingston Gym, Denison University (Granville, OH). The Who. The Spirit and Johnny Winter. Supporting acts: Owen B, The Dust

Black History

South Africa, Apartheid
November 6, 1962: the United Nations General Assembly passed Resolution 1761, which condemned Apartheid in South Africa and called on member-nations to boycott the country. The Resolution also set up a Special Committee against Apartheid.(see July 11, 1963)
Dee/Moore Murders
November 6, 1964: after an extensive FBI investigation, state authorities arrested James Ford Seale and Charles Marcus Edwards for the kidnapping and murder of Henry Dee and Charles Moore. (Dee/Moore, see Jan 11, 1965; BH, see Nov 9)

Vietnam

 Draft Card Burning
November 6, 1965: at a peace demonstration in Union Square, NYC, Thomas Cornell (teacher) Marc Edelman (cabinetmaker), Roy Lisker (novelist and teacher), and James Watson (on staff of Catholic Worker Pacifist Movenet) burn their draft cards, (Vietnam, see Nov 9; DCB, see Dec 21) 
November 6 Peace Love Activism

Symbionese Liberation Army

November 6 Peace Love Activism November 6 Peace Love Activism
November 6, 1973:  after several months of weapons training, the S.L.A. committed its first revolutionary act. They ambush and murder black Oakland school superintendent Marcus Foster and seriously wound his deputy, Robert Blackburn. (Marcus Foster article) (see Feb 4, 1974)

Medical Marijuana

November 6, 2012: Massachusetts became the 18th state to approve medical marijuana. (see July 23, 2013)

Stop and Frisk Policy

November 6, 2013: Burt Neuborne, a law professor at New York University, filed a legal brief in the federal appeals court in Manhattan on behalf of Judge Scheindlin, asking that he and a team of four other prominent lawyers be allowed to challenge the order disqualifying her from the stop-and-frisk case. The motion called the order removing her from the case procedurally deficient, inaccurate and unwarranted, and asked that it be vacated or reviewed by the full appeals court. (see Nov 13)

LGBT

November 6, 2014: in a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed lower court rulings in Ohio, Michigan, Tennessee and Kentucky that struck down same-sex marriage bans, allowing four states to prohibit same-sex unions. (NYT article) (see Nov 12)

Sexual abuse of children

November 6, 2014:  the Archdiocese of Chicago released thousands of internal documents showing how it hid the sexual abuse of children by 36 priests, adding to similar disclosures made earlier this year and fulfilling a pledge by Cardinal Francis George to release the files before he retired.

"We cannot change the past but we hope we can rebuild trust through honest and open dialogue," George said in a statement. "Child abuse is a crime and a sin."

In January, the archdiocese had released 6,000 documents on 30 abusive priests as part of a legal settlement with victims, and on this day posted online 15,000 more records related to 36 others and involving abuse allegations dating to the early 1950s. The files only covered cases in which the archdiocese substantiated the abuse, and did not include those against priests who died before their accusers came forward or those who served in religious orders. (see April 21, 2015)

 Stop and Frisk Policy

November 6, 2013: Burt Neuborne, a law professor at New York University, filed a legal brief in the federal appeals court in Manhattan on behalf of Judge Scheindlin, asking that he and a team of four other prominent lawyers be allowed to challenge the order disqualifying her from the stop-and-frisk case. The motion called the order removing her from the case procedurally deficient, inaccurate and unwarranted, and asked that it be vacated or reviewed by the full appeals court. (NYT article) (see Nov 13)

Environmental Issues

November 6, 2015: President Barack Obama rejected the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada in a victory for environmentalists who campaigned against the project for more than seven years.

"The pipeline would not make a meaningful long-term contribution to our economy," Obama told a press conference. He said it would not reduce gasoline prices, and shipping "dirtier" crude from Canada would not increase U.S. energy security. (see Dec 12)

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November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Race revolt
November 3, 1883: riots occurred in Danville, Va. White conservatives seized control of the local government, killing four African Americans in the process.(BH, see May 4; RR, see November 8, 1898)
Greensboro Massacre
November 3, 1979: five protest marchers were shot and killed by members of the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party. The protest was the culmination of attempts by the Communist Workers Party to organize mostly black industrial workers in the area. Five Klansmen were charged with murder. None were convicted. (NYT article) (see Dec 17)

Carol Moseley Braun

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1992: Carol Moseley Braun, a Democrat from Illinois, became the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Senate. (BH, see Dec 16; Feminism, see Nov 11) (NYT article)

Native Americans

Elk v. Wilkins
November 3, 1884, the question was whether an Indian, born a member of one of the Indian tribes within the US was, merely by reason of their birth within the US, and of their afterward voluntarily separating themselves from the tribe and taking up residence among citizens, a citizen of the US, within the meaning of the first section of the Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution. The Court decided that although “Indian tribes, being within the territorial limits of the United States, were not, strictly speaking, foreign states,” “they were alien nations, distinct political communities,” with whom the United States dealt with through treaties and acts of Congress. Native Americans were not US citizens.(Citizenship, see June 2, 1924; NA, see September 4, 1886)

INDEPENDENCE DAYS

Panama
November 3, 1903: with US assistance and plans to build a canal after independence, Panama became independent from Colombia. (see September 22, 1908)
Dominica
November 3, 1978: Dominica independent of United Kingdom. (see February 22, 1979)

US Labor History

Milk driver strike
November 3, 1921: striking milk drivers dump thousands of gallons of milk on New York City streets. (see Dec 15)
Transit worker strike
November 3, 2009: nearly 5,000 transit workers represented by Transport Workers Union Local 234 begin a strike in Philadelphia over wages, pensions, and benefits. The strike shut down the city’s bus, subway, and trolley service and after six days, a five-year contract deal was reached that provided pay and benefit increases. (see January 22, 2010)

Space Race, Sputnik 2

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1957: Sputnik 2 carried Laika, a female dog, into space. Although the satellite will remain in orbit for 162 days, scientists plan to put Laika to sleep after a week because there is no way to return her to Earth safely. Later reports indicate that Laika died soon after liftoff, from stress and high temperatures inside the capsule. (see Dec 6)
FREE SPEECH
November 3, 1960: an Alabama State Court jury awarded Police Commisioner L.B. Sullivan a libel judgment of $500,000 against The New York Times and four Alabama Negro ministers. (see February 15, 1961) 

November 3 Music et al

November  3 – 16, 1962: “He’s a Rebel” by The Crystals #1 Billboard Hot 100. The first of many Phil Spector produced hits.

Presidential elections

Lyndon B Johnson

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1964: Lyndon Johnson elected president in a landslide over Barry Goldwater. Johnson wins 486-52 in the electoral vote. Residents of the District of Columbia cast their ballots in a presidential election for the first time. (NYT)
Bill Clinton
November 3, 1992: Bill Clinton is elected the 42nd President of the United States. (NYT article)

Vietnam

November 3, 1969: President Nixon addressed the nation on television and radio, asking the "silent majority" to join him in solidarity with the Vietnam War effort, and to support his policies. Vice President Spiro T. Agnew denounces the President's critics as 'an effete corps of impudent snobs' and 'nattering nabobs of negativism'. (see Nov 13)

Feminism

November 3 Peace Love Activism
Bella Abzug
November 3, 1970: representing Manhattan on a feminist and anti-war platform, Bella Abzug, a lawyer specializing in civil rights, won a Congressional seat. (NYT re Bella Abzug) (see Dec 1)
November 3 Peace Love Activism

Symbionese Liberation Army

November 3, 1974: after months without hearing from Patty, Randolph Hearst withdrew his offer of a $50,000 reward for her safe return. (see January 2, 1975)

Iran–Contra Affair

November 3, 1986: the Lebanese magazine Ash-Shiraa reported that the United States had been selling weapons to Iran in secret, in order to secure the release of 7 American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon. (NYT re Iran) (see Nov 19)
Medical Marjuana

November 3 Peace Love Activism

November 3, 1998, Marijuana: Alaska, Arizona Oregon, Nevada, and Washington legalize medical marijuana. (NYT article) (see July 1999)
Physician-assisted Suicide
November 3, 1998, Michigan voters reject a proposal to legalize physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill. (NYT article)

Sexual Abuse of Children

November 3, 2002: Boston's Cardinal Law apologized for "decisions which led to suffering.” (see Nov 7)
LGBTQ, Gay marriage denied
November 3, 1998: anti-gay proponents succeeded in amending the Hawaii Constitution so as to prevent the courts from ending the exclusion of same-sex couples; under the Amendment, only the legislature could change that discrimination, notwithstanding the Equal Protection Clause. On the same day, anti-gay forces in Alaska pass Ballot Measure 2, which amended the state constitution to restrict marriage to different-sex couples. (NYT article)

LGBT, Gay marriage denied

November 3, 2009: anti-gay forces in Maine pushed through an anti-gay ballot measure to overturn the freedom to marry in the state and restrict marriage to different-sex couples. (NYT article) (see Dec 15)

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