Tag Archives: Native Americans

November 16 Peace Love Activism

November 16 Peace Love Activism

LSD

November 16 Peace Love Activism

November 16, 1938: Albert Hofmann, a chemist working for Sandoz Pharmaceutical in Basel, Switzerland, was the first to synthesize LSD-25. He discovered LSD, a semi-synthetic derivative of ergot alkaloids, while looking for a blood stimulant. 

He set it aside for five years, until April 16, 1943, when he decided to take a second look at it. While re-synthesizing LSD, he accidentally absorbed a small amount of the drug through his fingertips and discovered its powerful effects.(see April 16, 1943)

Cold War

November 16, 1945:  in a move that stirred up some controversy, the US shipped 88 German scientists to America to assist the nation in its production of rocket technology. Most of the men had served under the Nazi regime and critics questioned the morality of placing them in the service of America. Nevertheless, the U.S. government, desperate to acquire the scientific know-how that had produced the terrifying and destructive V-1 and V-2 rockets for Germany during WWII, and fearful that the Russians were also utilizing captured German scientists for the same end, welcomed the men with open arms.  (see January 31, 1946)

Religion and Public Education

November 16, 1947:  in support of Vashti McCollum’s case, a Baptist group said that programs of religious instruction in public school buildings were "an invasion of the time-honored doctrine of the separation of church and state." (see Nov 20)

Vietnam

Kennedy to…
November 16 Peace Love Activism
“President Kennedy has decided on the measures that the United States is prepared to take to strengthen South Vietnam against attack by Communists.”
November 16, 1961: President Kennedy decided to increase military aid to South Vietnam without committing U.S. combat troops. (NYT Article) (see Nov 18)
…Clinton
November 16, 2000: Bill Clinton became the first sitting U.S. President to visit Vietnam. (Vietnam)
Sons and Daughters In Touch
Spring 2003: Sons and Daughters In Touch led an historic two week journey to Vietnam. Guided by Vietnam combat veterans and nurses who served in the war, more than 50 Gold Star ‘sons and daughters’ were able to stand in the precise location where their fathers were lost. While in Vietnam, the SDIT delegation also visited Ho Chi Minh City, the Mekong Delta, Cu Chi, Da Nang, Quang Tri, Khe San, China Beach, Hue City and Hanoi. (see August 20, 2009)

see November 16 Music et al for more

Beatles Christmas Show
November 16, 1963: tickets for The Beatles’ Christmas Show sold out. CBS News bureau London – at the suggestion of Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein – sent a news crew to the British seaside resort of Bournemouth where they film a Beatles concert, thousands of screaming fans, and a few Beatles’ comments on camera.  This film clip is later sent to New York. (see Nov 21)

Deep Purple

November 16 – 22, 1963,  “Deep Purple” by Nino Tempo and April Stevens #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. [In 1968 Richie Blackmore suggested the title as the name for his new band named after his grandmother's favorite song.]
Jimi Hendrix
November 16 – 29, 1968: Electric Ladyland the Billboard #1 album.  (see June 20, 1969)
Mind Games
November 16, 1973: US release of Lennon’s fourth album, Mind Games.  (see Nov 24)
Whatever Gets You Through The Night
November 16, 1974,: John Lennon was at No.1 in the US singles chart with 'Whatever Gets You Through The Night.' Elton John played on the session and made a deal with Lennon that if the song reached No.1, Lennon would have to appear on stage live with Elton. Lennon kept his side of the deal and appeared live with Elton. They played three songs together: ‘I Saw Her Standing There,’ ‘Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds’ and ‘Whatever Gets You Through the Night.’ Backstage after the concert, Lennon got back with Yoko Ono after a temporary split. (see Nov 28)
Bob Dylan
November 16, 2016: the Nobel Academy said on its website that it had received a letter from Dylan explaining that due to “pre-existing commitments” he was unable to travel to Stockholm in December. “We look forward to Bob Dylan’s Nobel Lecture, which he must give ― it is the only requirement ― within six months counting from December 10.” (see Dec 10)
November 16 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing
November 16, 1977:  reported in the New York Times: The state rested its case in the Birmingham churchbombing trial today after presenting a witness who said that she saw packages of what appeared to be dynamite at the home of Robert E. Chambliss two weeks before the explosion in September 1963 that took the lives of four black children. (see November 18)

US Labor History

NFL Strike Ends
November 16, 1982, the National Football League Players Association ended a 57-day strike that shortened the season to nine games. The players wanted, but failed to win until many years later, a higher share of gross team revenues. (see December 19, 1984)

Native Americans

November 16 Peace Love Activism
Susquehannock artifacts on display at the State Museum of Pennsylvania in 2007
November 16, 1990: The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act required federal agencies and institutions that receive federal funding to return Native American "cultural items" to lineal descendants and culturally affiliated Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations. Cultural items include human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony. A program of federal grants assists in the repatriation process and the Secretary of the Interior could assess civil penalties on museums that failed to comply.

In 1992, the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the Americas prompted protests from many Native American tribes and supporters, prompting cities including Denver and San Francisco to stop their quincentenary celebrations. (see Feb 11 – July 15, 1994)

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November 15 Peace Love Activism

November 15 Peace Love Activism

November 15
Suffragists protest Woodrow Wilson’s suffragist policy

Feminism

Voting Rights
November 15
Rheta Louise Childe Dorr , first editor of the Suffragist newspaper.  In 1914 she told how she “…tried to get work on a newspaper, but they said I could only write such stuff as ‘Advice to the Lovelorn.’ I wouldn’t. Finally, in three years, I got a $25 a week job; and I never tot a raise in four years thereafter. That’s what I mean when I say women haven’t got the same right as men to work for promotion.”
November 15, 1913: first issue of The Suffragist published. Rheta Louise Childe Dorr was its first editor. (see Nov 18)
Suffragist Tortured, Night of Terror

November 15 Peace Love Activism

November 15, 1917: “Night of Terror” pickets (arrested Nov 10) transferred to Occoquan Workhouse, where Superintendent Raymond Whittaker, just back from White House meeting of district commissioners, set in motion a brutal reception for newly arrived prisoners. Whittaker summarily dismissed demands for political prisoner status and watched guards hurl Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smash her head against an iron bed, and knock her. Her cellmate, Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead and suffered a heart attack. They beat Lucy Burns, chained her hands to the cell bars above her head, and left her hanging for the night, bleeding and gasping for air. Julia Emory showed support and sympathy by assuming same position. The next day, 16 women went on hunger strike. (San Francisco site full story) (see Nov 18)

Calvin Graham

Battle of Guadalcanal
November 15, 1942: during the battle of Guadalcanal, the South Dakota was hit forty-seven times by enemy fire. One explosion threw Calvin down three decks of stairs. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel that tore through his jaw and mouth. In spite of his injuries, he helped pull fellow sailors from danger. Half the ship's crew of 3,300 were killed or wounded. He was awarded the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart and the Navy Unit Commendation medal.
36 years later…
November 15, 1978: the General Accounting Office received Graham’s claim from back-pay due him from his World War II service. (see Calvin Graham for full sad story)

The Cold War

 Nikita Khrushchev
November 15 Peace Love Activism
from NYT headline: “Nikita S. Khrushchev today asserted Soviet superiority in the field of missiles and challenged the United States to a rocket-range ‘shooting match.'”
November 15, 1957: in a long and rambling interview with an American reporter, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev claims that the Soviet Union has missile superiority over the United States and challenges America to a missile "shooting match" to prove his assertion. The interview further fueled fears in the United States that the nation was falling perilously behind the Soviets in the arms race. (NYT article) (see December 9, 1958)

November 15 Music et al

Beatles before their US appearance
November 15, 1959: Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison auditioned for a British talent program called TV Star Search at the Hippodrome Theatre in Lancashire. They had been known as The Quarrymen but for this audition, they took the name "Johnny and the Moondogs." They played two Buddy Holly songs: "Think It Over" and "It's So Easy." They must have been good as they were invited back for the next round of audition the next day.

They returned to Liverpool the same night, having no money to rent a hotel room, and therefore missing out on the next round of auditions. (see April 23 & 24, 1960)

Vietnam

Brown University
November 15 Peace Love Activism
President Johnson with Gen. Earle Wheeler in the center. From the NYT: A dozen students clashed with policemen tonight in a Pembroke College auditorium after a speech on Vietnam by Gen. Earle G. Wheeler, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
November 15, 1966: Gen. Earle Wheeler, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, addressed a gathering at Brown University and approximately 60 students walk out to protest his defense of U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Some of those who remained shouted and heckled Wheeler, while others attempted to storm the stage. Outside, over 100 students continued the protest. (Wheeler article) (see Dec 12)
March for Peace in Washington, DC
November 15 Peace Love Activism
From the NYT article: “A vast throng of Americans, predominantly youthful and constituting the largest mass march in the nation’s capital, demonstrated peacefully in the heart of the city today, demanding a rapid withdrawal of United States troops from Vietnam.”
November 15, 1969: 250,000 people marched for peace in Washington, DC . It was the largest antiwar rally in U.S. history. Some of the speakers: McCarthy, McGovern, Coretta King, Dick Gregory, Leonard Bernstein. Singers: Arlo Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Peter, Paul, & Mary, John Denver, Mitch Miller, touring cast of Hair . (NYT article) (see Nov 20)
November 15 Peace Love Activism

Irish Troubles

November 15, 1985: Britain and Ireland signed an accord giving Dublin an official consultative role in governing Northern Ireland. (see November 8, 1987)

Sexual Abuse of Children

November 15, 2004: US Roman Catholic bishops elected Bishop William Skylstad as their new president. His Washington diocese faced bankruptcy due to the volume of compensation claims made by alleged victims of child abuse. (see Dec 3)

ADA

November 15, 2006: the Road-to-Freedom tour kicked off. The 50-state bus tour and photographic exhibit chronicles the history of the grassroots "people's movement" that led to passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (see October 22, 2012)

Native Americans

 The Code Talkers
November 15 Peace Love Activism
Navajo Code Talkers stand and salute as the colors are posted during Code Talkers Day event in Window Rock, Ariz., Aug. 14. Photo courtesy of Morris Bitsie
November 15, 2008: President George W. Bush signed The Code Talkers Recognition Act of 2008 into law. The Act recognized every Native American code talker who served in the US military during WWI or WWII with a Congressional Gold Medal for his tribe (to be retained by the Smithsonian Institution) and a silver medal duplicate to each code talker. (see February 14, 2011)

Black History

Jimmie Lee Jackson
November 15 Peace Love Activism
Jimmie Lee Jackson (December 16, 1938 – February 26, 1965) was a civil rights activist in Marion, Alabama, and a deacon in the Baptist church. On February 18, 1965, while participating in a peaceful voting rights march in his city, he was beaten by troopers and shot by Alabama State Trooper James Bonard Fowler.
On February 18, 1965, during a protest near the Perry County Jail in Perry, Alabama, twenty-six-year-old Jimmie Lee Jackson, his mother Viola Jackson, and his 82-year-old grandfather, Cager Lee, ran into a cafe pursued by Alabama State Troopers. Police clubbed Cager Lee to the floor in the kitchen. His daughter Viola attempted to pull the police off, she was also beaten. When Jimmie Lee attempted to protect his mother, one trooper threw him against a cigarette machine. A second trooper shot Jimmie Lee twice in the abdomen. Jimmie Lee Jackson died 8 days later.  A grand jury will not indict James Fowler, the trooper who shot Jackson, but on May 10, 2007, 42 years after the homicide, an Alabama grand jury did indict the former state trooper for the February 18, 1965 murder of Jimmie Lee Jackson. On this date, November 15, 2010, James Fowler apologized for his shooting of Jimmie Lee Jackson, but insisted that he had acted in self-defense, believing that Mr. Jackson was trying to grab his gun. Fowler was sentenced to six months in prison. Perry County commissioner, Albert Turner Jr, called the agreement “a slap in the face of the people of this county.” Fowler served 5 of the 6 months. [BH, see June 26, 2011; Fowler, see July 5, 2015]
BLACK & SHOT
November 15, 2015: white Minneapolis police officers Mark Ringgenberg and Dustin Schwarze fatally shot Jamar Clark, 24, an unarmed black man. (B & S, see Nov 19; Minneapolis, see Nov 23)

Occupy Wall Street

Zuccotti Park
November 15, 2011: day 60 of Occupy Wall Street. NYPD began to clear Zuccotti Park. Mayor Bloomberg released the following statement: “At one o’clock this morning, the New York City Police Department and the owners of Zuccotti Park notified protesters in the park that they had to immediately remove tents, sleeping bags and other belongings, and must follow the park rules if they wished to continue to use it to protest. Many protesters peacefully complied and left. At Brookfield’s request, members of the NYPD and Sanitation Department assisted in removing any remaining tents and sleeping bags. This action was taken at this time of day to reduce the risk of confrontation in the park, and to minimize disruption to the surrounding neighborhood.” (NYT article) (see Nov 18)

LGBT

Gay marriage
November 15, 2013, LGBT: Gov. Neil Abercrombie signed legislation into law, making Hawaii the 15th state to legalize gay marriage. (NYT article) (see Nov 18)

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November 9 Peace Love Activism

November 9 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

Matilda Josyln Gage
November 9 Peace Love ActivismNovember 9, 1882: Gage’s daughter,Maud, married L. Frank Baum in the parlor of the Gage home. Under the influence of his wife and mother-in-law, Baum became an enthusiastic convert to feminism. He was, ''a secure man who did not worry about asserting his masculine authority,'' and he was not bothered that Maud had the upper hand in the marriage; in fact he seemed to welcome her take-charge attitude. His feminist beliefs would have a profound effect on his fiction. Nearly all of his child heroes were girls, girls who rely on their own resources and not on the aid, or validation, of men. He thought men who did not support feminist aspirations ''selfish, opinionated, conceited or unjust -- and perhaps all four combined,'' as he wrote in a newspaper editorial. ''The tender husband, the considerate father, the loving brother, will be found invariably championing the cause of women.''(Feminism, see March 8, 1884; Gage, see "March" 1886)

US Labor History

John L Lewis

November 9 Peace Love Activism

November 9, 1935: United Mine Workers president John L. Lewis and other labor leaders formed the Committee for Industrial Organization.
Joe Hill
In 1936, based on a 1925 poem by Alfred Hayes (1911 – 1985), Earl Robinson (1910 – 1991) wrote the song “Joe Hill” in 1936. Joan Baez has sung the song throughout her career, most notably at the 1969 Woodstock Music and Arts Festival [at the time of the concert, Baez’s husband, David Harris, was in prison for draft evasion]. (see Dec 30)

INDEPENDENCE DAY

November 9, 1953: Cambodia independent from France. (see October 26, 1955)

Black History

Emmett Till
November 9, 1955:  returning to Mississippi one last time, Moses Wright and Willie Reed testified before a LeFlore County grand jury in Greenwood, Mississippi. The grand jury refused to indict Milam or Bryant for kidnapping. The two men go free. 

November 9, 1961: the Professional Golfers Association eliminated the "Caucasian" clause from its constitution. (BH, see Nov 17; see Emmett Till)
PGA
November 9, 1961: the Professional Golfers Association eliminated the "Caucasian" clause from its constitution. (see Nov 17)
George Whitmore, Jr
November 9, 1964: Whitmore’s trial for the attempted rape and assault of Borrero opened in Brooklyn. (When a defendant faces trials for more than one crime, it is a common tactic of prosecutors to try the least serious case first so that, if convicted, the defendant will have a criminal record when he goes to trial for a more serious crime. This will discourage the defendant from taking the stand in the latter trial. If the defendant nonetheless chooses to testify, the prior conviction may be used for impeachment purposes on cross examination. It also may be used against the defendant at sentencing.) (see George Whitmore)
SOUTH AFRICA/APARTHEID
November 9, 1976: The United Nations General Assembly approved 10 resolutions condemning apartheid in South Africa. (see April 27, 1977)
Timothy M. Wolfe resigns
November 9, 2015, Timothy M. Wolfe, the president of the University of Missouri system, announced that he was resigning amid a wave of student protests over the school’s handling of racial tensions. Wolfe announced his resignation as the university’s governing board met in Columbia, the centerpiece of the four-campus system. Wolfe took to the podium before a meeting of the Board of Curators and made the announcement before a room full of reporters and other spectators. The announcement seemed to jar the people in the room. (see January 8, 2016)

see November 9 Music et al for more

Beatles
November 9, 1961, The Beatles before their US appearance: The Beatles performed at the Cavern Club at lunchtime. That night they appear at Litherland Town Hall, Liverpool (their final performance at that venue). This is a major day for The Beatles, although they are unaware of it at the time--in the audience at the Cavern Club show is Brian Epstein, dressed in his pin-stripe suit and seeing The Beatles for the first time. Accompanying Epstein is his assistant Alistair Taylor. Epstein will recall his first impressions in a 1964 interview: "They were fresh and they were honest, and they had:star quality. Whatever that is, they had it, or I sensed that they had it." Over the next few weeks, Epstein becomes more and more interested in possibly managing The Beatles and he does a lot of research into just exactly what that would entail. When he speaks with the group's embittered ex-manager Allan Williams, he is told, "Brian, don't touch 'em with a fucking barge pole." Nonetheless, Epstein invites The Beatles to a meeting at his record store on December 3. 
James Brown
November 9, 1968: James Brown gave support to the civil rights movement with his song, "Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud (Part 1)," which hit number one on the R & B charts for a record sixth straight week.

FREE SPEECH

March 9, 1964: New York Times v. Sullivan. The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, protected a newspaper from being sued for libel in state court for making false defamatory statements about the official conduct of a public official, because the statements were not made with knowing or reckless disregard for the truth. Supreme Court of Alabama reversed and remanded, i.e. the Court held that defamatory falsehoods about public officials can be punished -- only  if the offended official can prove the falsehoods were published with "actual malice," i.e.: "knowledge that the statement was false or with reckless disregard of whether it was false or not." Other kinds of "libelous statements" are also punishable. (FS, see Mar 30; Sullivan, see April 6)

Vietnam

War Protest
November 9, 1965: in New York City, 22-year-old Catholic Worker Movement member Roger Allen LaPorte set himself on fire in front of the United Nations building in protest of the war. Before dying the next day, LaPorte declared, "I'm against wars, all wars. I did this as a religious act." (NYT article) (see Nov 14)
Massachusetts v. Laird
November 9, 1970: the Supreme Court voted 6-3 in Massachusetts v. Laird not to hear the case of Massachusetts's anti-draft law. The state had passed a law which allowed its citizens to decline to fight in any undeclared war, even if the person was drafted. The law was passed in opposition to the draft and the war in Vietnam. The 1st Circuit found the war constitutional and thus struck down the law. (see Nov 17)

Native Americans

Alcatraz Takeover

 

November 9 Peace Love Activism
Richard Oakes on Alcatraz
November 9, 1969: Mohawk Indian Richard Oakes leads an attempt to occupy Alcatraz Island twice in one day. Fourteen Native Americans stay overnight and leave peacefully the following morning.  The video following is a report on the takeover. (see Nov 20)

LGBTQ

Jones v. Hallahan
November 9, 1973: The Kentucky Court of Appeals ruled in Jones v. Hallahan that same-sex couples may not marry. The case came after Marjorie Jones and Tracy Knight applied for and were denied a marriage license in Jefferson County, KY. (see Dec 15)

November 9 Peace Love Activism

Dissolution of the USSR

Fall of the Berlin Wall
November 9, 1989: East Germany’s communist government allowed all citizens direct passage to the west, rendering the Berlin Wall obsolete. (NYT article) (see Nov 28)

Iraq War II

November 9, 2006: Iraqi health minister reports 150,000 Iraqi civilians have been killed in the war — “about three times previously accepted estimates.” (see Dec 2)

Arthur Bremer

November 9, 2007: after 35 years of incarceration, Arthur Bremer (shot George Wallace) was released from prison. His probation ends in 2025.

DEATH PENALTY

November 9, 2016: Nebraskans voted overwhelmingly to restore the death penalty and nullify the historic 2015 vote by state lawmakers to repeal capital punishment. Rural voters voted to "repeal the repeal" by margins as large as 4-to-1 in counties outside Lincoln and Omaha. (see Dec 13)

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