Tag Archives: Martin Luther King Jr

October 16 Peace Love Activism

October 16 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

DEATH PENALTY
October 1692: Governor William Phipps of Massachusetts ordered the Court of Oyer and Terminer dissolved and replaced with the Superior Court of Judicature, which forbade the type of sensational testimony allowed in the earlier trials. Executions ceased, and the Superior Court eventually released all those awaiting trial and pardoned those sentenced to death. The Salem witch trials, which resulted in the executions of 19 innocent women and men, had effectively ended. (DP, see April 30, 1790)
“Of Husband and Wife”
1776 – 1830: state laws rather than federal law governed women’s rights in the early Republic and most of those laws were based on Sir William Blackstone’s 1769  "Of Husband and Wife" in his Commentaries on the Laws of England.  In “Of Husband and Wife” he explained the legal concept of Coverture, whereby, upon marriage, a woman's legal rights were subsumed by those of her husband. He explained:

By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband: under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs every thing; and is therefore called in our law-French a feme-covert; is said to be covert-baron, or under the protection and influence of her husband, her baron, or lord; and her condition during her marriage is called her coverture. Upon this principle, of a union of person in husband and wife, depend almost all the legal rights, duties, and disabilities, that either of them acquire by the marriage. I speak not at present of the rights of property, but of such as are merely personal. For this reason, a man cannot grant any thing to his wife, or enter into covenant with her: for the grant would be to suppose her separate existence; and to covenant with her, would be only to covenant with himself: and therefore it is also generally true, that all compacts made between husband and wife, when single, are voided by the intermarriage. (see May 20, 1782)
Women’s Health

October 16 Peace Love Activism

October 16, 1916: birth control pioneer Margaret Sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the U.S. on this day in the Brownsville neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. She opened it with her sister, Ethel Byrne, who was a registered nurse. More than 100 women and about 20 men were lined up outside the two-room office on Amboy Street when Sanger opened the door. The clinic served 448 people that first day.  (see Oct 26)

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Revolts

October 16 Peace Love Activism

October 16 - 17, 1859: with a group of slaves and white abolitionists, John Brown led an capture a federal armory and arsenal in Harper’s Ferry,VA . A local militia under the leadership of Robert E Lee put down the insurrection. The raid hastened the advent of the Civil War, which started two years later. (see Oct 25 – Nov 2)
October 16 Peace Love Activism
President Roosevelt at Tuskegee Institute with Booker T Washington
Booker T. Washington
October 16, 1901: President Theodore Roosevelt invited Booker T. Washington, founder of the Tuskegee Institute and the most prominent African American of his time, to a meeting in the White House. When the meeting went long, the President asked Washington to stay for dinner, the first African American to do so. The President’s act drew harsh criticism from some Southerners. (see February 18, 1903)
MARTIN LUTHER KINGOctober 16 Peace Love Activism
October 16, 1962: Martin Luther King meets with President John F. Kennedy to discuss the issues King was involved with. (BH, see Nov 18; MLK see Nov 27)
Olympic Project for Human RightsOctober 16 Peace Love Activism
October 16, 1968: African American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos placed first and third in the 200-meter dash at the Olympic Games in Mexico City, Mexico. As the national anthem played during the medal ceremony, rather than hold their hands over their hearts and face the American flag, the two men bowed their heads and raised black gloved fists in a silent protest against racial discrimination in the United States. Both men wore black socks with no shoes and Smith also wore a black scarf around his neck. At a press conference following the demonstration, Smith explained he had raised his right fist to represent black power in America, while Carlos had raised his left fist to represent black unity. Smith said the black scarf represented black pride and the black socks without shoes were intended to signify black poverty in America.

The demonstration was supported by Australian silver medalist Peter Norman, who wore a patch representing the Olympic Project for Human Rights, an organization established in 1967 that had urged athletes to boycott the Olympics to protest racial segregation in the United States, South Africa, and in sports generally. Two days after their gesture of protest, Smith and Carlos were expelled from the Olympic Village for allegedly violating the principles of the Olympic spirit.

Despite their medal-winning performances, the two athletes faced intense criticism and received death threats upon returning home. At the time, their protest was largely perceived as a show of disrespect directed toward the American flag and national anthem, though supporters praised their bravery. Gradually, the symbolic importance of their protest came to be more widely recognized. Today, the image of the two men with fists and heads bowed is one of the most enduring symbols of the American civil rights struggle. (see Oct 18)
SOUTH AFRICA/APARTHEID
October 16, 1984: South African activist Bishop Desmond Tutu awarded Nobel Peace Prize. (see February 10, 1985)
The Million Man March
October 16, 1995: The Million Man March was held in Washington, D.C. The event was conceived by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. (see January 8, 1996)
Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial

October 16 Peace Love Activism

October 16, 2011: the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial was formally dedicated in Washington, D.C. (see February 24, 2012)

Immigration History

October 16, 1918: the 1918 Immigration Act, passed in the middle of anti-radical hysteria during World War I, amended the restrictive 1903 Immigration Act (passed on March 3, 1903) to expand the definition of, and restrictions on, anarchists. The new law barred the entry into the U.S., and allowed the deportation of, anarchists, who were defined as anyone teaching opposition to organized government, teaching the violent overthrow of government, or were members of organizations that advocated those ideas. It also repealed the provision in the 1903 law that had exempted from deportation immigrants who had lived in the U.S. for five years or longer.

In the years ahead, additional restrictive immigration laws were passed. The 1924 Immigration Act, passed on May 26, 1924, imposed a national origins quota system that discriminated against people from Southern and Eastern Europe seeking to come to the U.S. The 1952 McCarran-Walter Act, effective June 27, 1952, was a Cold War measure that excluded alleged “subversives” from the U.S. and allowed the government to deport alleged “subversive” immigrants already in the U.S.  The 1965 Immigration Act, which President Lyndon Johnson signed into law on October 3, 1965, abolished the 1924 national origins quota system in favor of a non-discriminatory policy. (Anarchism, see Nov 11; Immigration, see May 19, 1921)
October 16 Peace Love Activism

Nuclear/Chemical News

October 16 Peace Love ActivismOctober 16, 1964: China tested an atomic weapon for the first time thus becoming fifth nation with nuclear weapon capability joining the United States, the Soviet Union, Great Britain, and France. (see Feb 18, 1965) (NYT article)

Vietnam

October 16, 1965: anti-war rallies occur in 40 American cities and in international cities including London and Rome. (see Oct 30)(NYT article)

October 16 Music et al

Rock Venues #1

October 16, 1965:  from Professor Poster Facebook page: … back in 1965…this rare "Poster From The Past" handbill advertised the very FIRST event promoted by the Family Dog at The Longshoreman’s Hall in San Francisco. Ellen Harmon, one of the four original partners in the Family Dog collective, was an avid reader of Marvel comic books and she helped dedicate the first dance to “Dr. Strange,” Master of the Mystic Arts. The comic book theme continued through the next two dances, known as “A Tribute to Sparkle Plenty” and “A Tribute to Ming the Merciless,” both 1940s comic book characters. Alton Kelley, also an original Family Dog founder/partner, created the artwork for all three handbills and went on to do numerous others which are documented in the MANY poster that we love so much.

Jefferson Airplane teamed up with first-time promoters, the Family Dog (Chet Helms, who would join later). They decided that the Longshoreman's Hall was a venue large enough to be filled with dancing bodies. Along with the Charlatans, the Marbles, and Great Society, Jefferson Airplane played the very first Family Dog concert. In the crowd, people dressed up in costumes happily danced along to the music. From this initial Family Dog concert, the San Francisco music scene would change forever. This handbill, measuring 8 1/2" x 11" is an extremely rare flyer printed on thin yellow/white paper. Because it comes from the earliest Family Dog show, it has become extremely sought after and VERY expensive!. This is a VERY SPECIAL and historic handbill that marks the very Beginning of what became a real movement here.  (see Nov 6)
Paul McCartney/The Family Way
October 16, 1966: United Artists announced that the film was to be retitled All In Good Time, and that Lennon and McCartney would be writing the soundtrack together. It was eventually released as The Family Way and Lennon had no involvement in the music. (see Nov 7)
Jimi Hendrix

October 16 Peace Love Activism

October 16, 1968: release of the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s 'Electric Ladyland' album. It was also made available as two albums with changed artwork after complaints about the naked women who were pictured on the inner sleeve. The female models were paid for the photo shoot and double if they posed completely naked. Hendrix was displeased with both. He had wanted one of the band and himself in NYC’s Central Park on an Alice in Wonderland statue. (see Nov 16 – 29)
Rock Venues #2
October 16, 2006: CBGB, the legendary New York punk club credited with discovering Patti Smith and Ramones, closed after a final gig by Smith herself. Blondie and Talking Heads also found fame after performing at the club, which helped launch US punk music. The venue first opened in December 1973, its full name CBGB OMFUG standing for "country, bluegrass, blues and other music for uplifting gormandizers".

Vietnam

Oakland, California
October 16 Peace Love Activism
Folk singer Joan Baez is arrested by police and directed to a nearby police wagon during the sit-in demonstration in front of the Oakland Induction Center in Oakland, Calif., on Oct. 16, 1967. Demonstrators blocked the building entrance in protest of the Vietnam war draft. (AP Photo)
October 16, 1967: Oakland CA police arrested thirty-nine people, including singer-activist Joan Baez, for blocking the entrance of that city's military induction center.

Gulf Six

October 16, 1973:  the  Gulf Six (Iran, Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar) unilaterally raise the posted price of Saudi Light marker crude 17 percent from $3.12 to $3.65 per barrel and announce production cuts.  (NYT article)

TERRORISM

October 16, 1987: an Iranian Silkworm missile launched from the Iranian occupied Al-Faw Peninsula strikes the ship Sea Isle City. The missile struck the wheel house and crew quarters of the ship which was not carrying oil at the. A total of 18 crew members were wounded. (see Oct 19)

Irish Troubles

October 16, 1998:  David Trimble and John Hume were named recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize for brokering the Northern Ireland peace accord. (see November 29, 1999)

IRAQ II

October 16, 2002: President George W. Bush signed a congressional resolution authorizing war against Iraq. (see Nov 27)

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October 14 Peace Love Activism

October 14 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Marcus Garvey
October 14, 1919: a man named George Tyler visited Garvey at his office in Harlem. Tyler pulled out a gun and shot Garvey in the right leg and head. Garvey sustained injuries but survived the attack. Tyler was arrested but is reported to have committed suicide the day after his arrest. (NYT article) (Garvey, see January 23, 1920)
 District of Columbia Bar Association
October 14, 1958: the District of Columbia Bar Association voted to accept black lawyers for the first time: attorneys in the District of Columbia were not required to belong to a professional bar association in the 1950s, but the District maintained several voluntary bar associations that lawyers could choose to join. The Bar Association of the District of Columbia became known as the “white bar,” while the Washington Bar Association served as the “black bar.” Washington has a long history of racial separation and in the Jim Crow era, mandatory segregation laws remained in force. While black and white lawyers practiced in the same courtrooms, most other facilities in the District remained separated by race and the bar associations furthered that custom. Even Washington’s law library, located within a federal courthouse, refused to admit African American attorneys.

The Bar Association of the District of Columbia finally desegregated due in a large part to the efforts of Charles S. Rhyne, a white man who ran for president of the organization on a pledge to desegregate. Though he faced intensely hostile reactions from many of his colleagues, Rhyne eventually was able to amend the bar association’s constitution and remove the race-based membership criteria. Several years later, on October 14, 1958, the Bar Association of the District Columbia voted to integrate and begin accepting African American members. The “black” Washington Bar Association nevertheless opted to continue operation, open to all but with a focus on the needs and concerns of black lawyers in Washington. Both associations still exist today. (see Oct 25)
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR
October 14, 1964: Martin Luther King, Jr., awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. At 35 years of age, King was the youngest person ever to receive the award. (NYT article) (BH, see Oct 31; MLK, see Nov 18)

 
George Whitmore, Jr
October 14, 1965: Richard Robles went on trial before a jury and New York County Supreme Court Justice Irwin D. Davidson for the Wylie-Hoffert murders. (see George Whitmore, Jr)

see News Music to listen

Harry Dixon
Around 1920:  Harry Dixon (1895 – 1965) wrote "This Little Light of Mine" as a gospel song. It became a common one sung during the civil rights gathering of the 1950s and 1960s. It continues to be a song of hope today. (BH, see January 4, 1920)
Fats Waller
In 1929: composed by Fats Waller with lyrics by Harry Brooks and Andy Razaf, Edith Wilson (1896 – 1981) sang "(What Did I Do to Be So) Black and Blue.”. It is a protest song that did not speak of how something should change so much as it spoke of what life was like for those who suffered inequities.
Blind Alfred Reed
In 1929: Blind Alfred Reed (1880 – 1956) wrote “How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live?” The song describes life during the Great Depression.
Florence Reece
In 1931: Florence Reece (1900-1986) “was a writer and social activist whose song ‘Which Side Are You On?’ became an anthem for the labor movement. Borrowing from the melody of the old hymn ''Lay the Lily Low,'' Mrs. Reece wrote the union song...to describe the plight of mine workers who were organizing a strike in Harlan County, Ky. Mrs. Reece's husband, Sam, who died in 1978, was one of those workers. Pete Seeger, the folk singer, recorded the song in 1941. It has since been used worldwide by groups espousing labor and social issues.” -- New York Times Obituaries, August 6, 1986. (Labor, see March 3; Feminism, see Dec 10)
Brother Can You Spare a Dime
In 1931:  “Brother Can You Spare a Dime” by lyricist E. Y. "Yip" Harburg and composer Jay Gorney., the song asked why the men who built the nation – built the railroads, built the skyscrapers – who fought in the war (World War I), who tilled the earth, who did what their nation asked of them should, now that the work is done and their labor no longer necessary, find themselves abandoned, in bread lines.

Harburg believed that “songs are an anodyne against tyranny and terror and that the artist has historically always been on the side of humanity.” As a committed socialist, he spent three years in Uruguay to avoid being involved in WWI, as he felt that capitalism was responsible for the destruction of the human spirit, and he refused to fight its wars. A longtime friend of Ira Gershwin, Harburg started writing lyrics after he lost his business in the Crash of 1929.
Jimmie Rogers
In 1932: Jimmie Rogers (1897 – 1933) was born in Meridian, Mississippi worked on the railroad as his father did but at the age of 27 contracted tuberculosis and had to quit. He loved entertaining and eventually found a job singing on WWNC radio, Asheville, North Carolina (April 18, 1927). Later he began recording his songs. The tuberculosis worsened and he died in 1933 while recording songs in New York. In 1932 he recorded “Hobo’s Meditation.”
Lead Belly
in 1938: Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter) (1888 – 1949) sang about his visit to Washington, DC with his wife and their treatment while in the nation’s capitol in his song, “Bourgeois Blues”. (BH, see Nov 22)
Woody Guthrie
In 1939: During the Great Depression, Woody Guthrie (1912-1967) wrote many songs reflecting the plight of farmers and migrant workers caught between the Dust Bowl drought and farm foreclosure. One of the best known of these songs is his  “Do Re Mi.”
Tom Joad
In 1940: Woody Guthrie wrote Tom Joad, a song whose character is based on John Steinbeck’s character in The Grapes of Wrath. After hearing it, Steinbeck reportedly said, “ That f****** little b******! In 17 verses he got the entire story of a thing that took me two years to write.” * (see Feb 23)

Technological Milestone

October 14, 1947: Air Force test pilot Charles E. Yeager became the first person to break the sound barrier when he flew the experimental Bell X-1 rocket plane over Edwards Air Force Base in California. (see December 23, 1947)
 

Cold War

FREE SPEECH
October 14, 1949: eleven top leaders of the American Communist Party were convicted of violating the Smith Act, which made it a crime to advocate the overthrow the government. The guilty verdict was appealed. (Red Scare, see Nov 2; Free Speech, see March 31, 1950; trial appeal, see June 4, 1951)

Cuban Missile Crisis

October 14 Peace Love Activism

October 14, 1962: a US Air Force U-2 plane on a photo-reconnaissance mission captured proof of Soviet missile bases under construction in Cuba. (see Oct 18)
Nikita Khrushchev
October 14 Peace Love ActivismOctober 14, 1964: Nikita Khrushchev was ousted as both premier of the Soviet Union and chief of the Communist Party after 10 years in power. He was succeeded as head of the Communist Party by his former protégé Leonid Brezhnev, who would eventually become the chief of state as well. (click → NY article)  (see January 23, 1967)

Peace Corps

October 14, 1960: Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy suggested formation of a Peace Corps during a talk at the University of Michigan.

October 14 Peace Love Activism

October 14 Music et al

October 14 – 27, 1967: Bobbie Gentry’s Ode to Billie Joe the Billboard #1 album.

Vietnam

October 14, 1968: U.S. Defense Department officials announced that the Army and Marines woiuld be sending about 24,000 men back to Vietnam for involuntary second tours because of the length of the war, high turnover of personnel resulting from the one year of duty, and the tight supply of experienced soldiers. This decision had an extremely negative impact on troop morale and the combat readiness of U.S. forces elsewhere in the world as troops were transferred to meet the increased personnel requirements in Vietnam. (see Oct 27)

LGBTQ

see Anita Bryant for more
October 14, 1977, LGBTQ  gay rights activists pie Anita Bryant during a press conference in Des Moines, Iowa. (see Nov 8)

October 14 Peace Love Activism
National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights
October 14, 1979: an estimated 75,000 people participate in the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights. LGBTQ and straights demanded equal civil rights and urged the passage of protective civil rights legislature. (LGBTQ. see July 9, 1980; Feminism, see July 7, 1981) (NYT article)

Immigration History

October 14, 2010: Derrick M. Donchak, 20, of Shenandoah, and Brandon J. Piekarsky were found guilty on all counts (including hate crimes) in the July 12, 2008 beating death of immigrant Luis Ramirez, .

They had previously been acquitted of murder charges in state court and convicted of simple assault.

"Four people attacked one person because of his race and because they didn't want people like him living in their town," prosecutor Myesha K. Braden said during her closing argument.

Witnesses testified that racist language was used before and during the attack and that Ramirez was kicked in the head repeatedly after falling down. The defendants, they said, didn't want immigrants in their neighborhood and repeatedly ordered Ramirez to leave.

Regarding the cover up, Braden said, "They hatched a plan to leave out the kick, to leave out the race and even to leave out the drinking." (IH and Ramirez, see January 27, 2011)

Women’s Health

October 14, 2014: the Supreme Court blocked a federal appeals court ruling that had forced many abortion clinics in Texas to close. The Supreme Court’s order, which was five sentences long, allowed the clinics to remain open while appeals proceeded. (BC, see Dec 22; Texas, see June 27, 2016) (NYT article)

Sexual Abuse of Children

October 14, 2014: the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph agreed to settle 30 sexual abuse lawsuits for $9.95 million. The agreement resolved all 30 outstanding claims – including some involving priests in Independence – filed from 2010 to early 2014 alleging abuse by priests from the diocese from 20 or more years ago. (see Nov 6)

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September 20 Peace Love Activism

September 20 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

Equal Rights Party
September 20, 1884: a group of American suffragists formed the Equal Rights Party in San Francisco, dedicated to "equal and exact justice to every class of our citizens, without distinction of color, sex, or nationality" and in support of the proposition that "the laws of the several states be so amended that women will be recognized as voters, and their property-rights made equal with that of the male population, to the end that they may become self-supporting - rather than a dependent class." (see March 1886)
“Battle of the Sexes”

September 20 Peace Love Activism

September 20, 1973:  in a highly publicized "Battle of the Sexes" tennis match, top women's player Billie Jean King, 29, beat Bobby Riggs, 55, a former No. 1 ranked men's player. Riggs (1918-1995), a self-proclaimed male chauvinist, had boasted that women were inferior, that they couldn't handle the pressure of the game and that even at his age he could beat any female player. The match was a huge media event, witnessed in person by over 30,000 spectators at the Houston Astrodome and by another 50 million TV viewers worldwide. King made a Cleopatra-style entrance on a gold litter carried by men dressed as ancient slaves, while Riggs arrived in a rickshaw pulled by female models. Legendary sportscaster Howard Cosell called the match, in which King beat Riggs 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. King's achievement not only helped legitimize women's professional tennis and female athletes, but it was seen as a victory for women's rights in general. NYT pdf: King defeats Riggs  (see Nov 12)

BLACK HISTORY

US Labor History
September 20, 1891:  African American sharecroppers affiliated with the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance and Union go on strike for higher wages and an end to peonage in Lee County, Arkansas. By the time a white mob – led by the local sheriff – put down the strike, more than a dozen people had been killed. (BH, see March 9, 1892; Labor, see Oct 31)

Emmett Till

September 20, 1955:  Judge Curtis Swango recesses the court to allow more witnesses to be found. It is the first time in Mississippi history that local law enforcement, local NAACP leaders and black and white reporters team up to locate sharecroppers who saw Milam's truck and overheard Emmett being beaten. (see Emmett Till)
see Martin Luther King, Jr assassination attempt for more

September 20 Peace Love Activism

September 20, 1958: Dr Aubre de L Maynard, chief of surgery at Harlem Hospital, removed a letter opener from the chest of Martin Luther King, Jr. King. Izola Ware Curry had stabbed King with a steel letter opener while he signed copies of his book, Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story.  Curry also carried a fully loaded .25-calibre automatic. 

In 1968, the day before he was assassinated, King spoke to a group and referred to this incident:

It came out in the New York Times the next morning, that if I had merely sneezed, I would have died. Well, about four days later, they allowed me, after the operation, after my chest had been opened, and the blade had been taken out, to move around in the wheel chair in the hospital. They allowed me to read some of the mail that came in, and from all over the states and the world, kind letters came in. I read a few, but one of them I will never forget. I had received one from the President and the Vice-President. I've forgotten what those telegrams said. I'd received a visit and a letter from the Governor of New York, but I've forgotten what that letter said. But there was another letter that came from a little girl, a young girl who was a student at the White Plains High School. And I looked at that letter, and I'll never forget it. It said simply,
Dear Dr. King,

I am a ninth-grade student at the White Plains High School.”

And she said,

While it should not matter, I would like to mention that I’m a white girl. I read in the paper of your misfortune, and of your suffering. And I read that if you had sneezed, you would have died. And I’m simply writing you to say that I’m so happy that you didn’t sneeze.

 And I want to say tonight -- I want to say tonight that I too am happy that I didn't sneeze. Because if I had sneezed, I wouldn't have been around here in 1960, when students all over the South started sitting-in at lunch counters. And I knew that as they were sitting in, they were really standing up for the best in the American dream, and taking the whole nation back to those great wells of democracy which were dug deep by the Founding Fathers in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. (BH, see  Sept 27; MLK, see January 24, 1960; Curry, see March 7, 2015) (PDF NYT article: MLK stabbed)
James H Meredith
September 20, 1962: defying orders of the Federal courts, Mississippi Governor Ross R Barnett denied Meredith admission to the University of Mississippi. The Justice Department immediately obtained contempt of court citations against Dr J D Williams, university chancellor; Dr Robert B Ellis, registrar, and Dean Anthony B Lewis. (see September 25, 1962)

September 20 Music et al

Beatles break-up
September 20, 1969: John Lennon announced to the others that he was leaving the band. (see Sept 26)
Blind Faith
September 20, 1969 – October 3, 1969: Blind Faith’s Blind Faith is the Billboard #1 album. (article about cover)
 
“Sugar, Sugar”
September 20 – October 17, 1969: “Sugar, Sugar” by The Archies #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. This was the most successful song in the bubblegum rock genre. There was no actual Archies group  but a group of studio musicians who played behind the animated Archie TV characters.
 
September 20 Peace Love Activism

Calvin Graham

September 20, 1976: Graham again requested an honorable discharge from the Navy. (see Calvin Graham)

TERRORISM

East Beirut, Lebanon

September 20 Peace Love Activism

September 20, 1984:  the Shi'a Islamic militant group Hezbollah, with support and direction from the Islamic Republic of Iran, carried out a suicide car bombing targeting the U.S. embassy annex in East Beirut, Lebanon. The attack killed 24 people. including 2 U.S. military. (see Dec 4)
Oklahoma City Explosion
September 20, 1994:  Terry Nichols and Timothy McVeigh rented a storage shed and began gathering supplies for the truck bomb they would use in Oklahoma City.(see April 19, 1995)

Native Americans

September 20, 1998: California made Native American Day an official state holiday. (see, March 22, 1999)

Japanese Internment Camps

September 20 Peace Love Activism

September 20, 2006: The Heart Mountain Relocation Center, which had held almost 11,000 Japanese-Americans interned during World War II, was designated a National Historic Landmark on this day, to be maintained by the National Park Service. The closest town to the Heart Mountain Relocation Center is Ralston, Wyoming, with a population of less than 300 people, about 76 miles from Billings, Montana. (see Dec 21)
September 20 Peace Love Activism

LGBTQ

September 20, 2011: the US military officially ended its policy of “Don't ask, don't tell” allowing gay and lesbian personal to publicly declare their sexual orientation.  (see Sept 29)

Environmental Issues

September 20, 2014: hundreds of thousands of demonstrators from around the world turned out for the massive People’s Climate March, filling the streets of midtown Manhattan with demands for global leaders take action to avert catastrophic climate change. (see Dec 17)

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