Tag Archives: Don’t Ask Don’t Tell

October 20 Peace Love Activism

October 20 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

Voting Rights
October 20, 1917: Alice Paul and three colleagues were arrested for picketing the White House on behalf of women’s suffrage. Calling themselves “Silent Sentinels,” the purposefully went to the White House gates when staff were leaving work. A large crowd gathered, with some people cheering and other jeering. (see Oct 22)

BLACK HISTORY

Dyer anti-lynching bill
October 20, 1921: the House Judiciary Committee favorable reported the Dyer anti-lynching bill, imposing heavy penalties on persons involved in mob action resulting in the taking of life. (see Oct 26)
”SCOTTSBORO BOYS”
October 20, 1933: The cases were removed from Judge Horton's jurisdiction and transferred to Judge William Callahan's court. (SB, see Scottsboro travesty)
“Durham Manifesto”
October 20, 1942: sixty leading Southern Blacks issued "Durham Manifesto" calling for fundamental changes in race relations after a Durham, North Carolina, meeting. (listen NC Museum of History) (see see Dec 4)
Tallahassee bus boycott
October 20, 1956: modeled after the Montgomery bus boycott, the Tallahassee bus boycott had begun after a May 17, 1956 incident in which two Florida A&M students were arrested for sitting in the white section of a city bus. Because the city’s buses were primarily patronized by African American residents, the boycott left the vehicles nearly empty. In July 1956, city officials were forced to suspend bus service due to lost revenue. The bus company resumed services in August following an initiative led by the Junior Chamber of Commerce to get more white residents to ride the buses but the boycott continued. The Tallahassee Inter-Civic Council (ICC) led the boycott and organized a carpool to serve as alternative transportation.

In October 1956, 21 carpool drivers, including nine people who comprised the ICC's executive committee, were arrested for not having “for hire” tags on their vehicles. On October 20, 1956, following a three-and-a-half-day trial, all 21 drivers were convicted. City Judge John Rudd sentenced them to pay a $500 fine or spend 60 days in jail, in addition to a suspended 60-day jail term and one year on probation.

Faced with this legal harassment, the ICC voted to end the carpool two days later. The boycott continued until December, however, ending only after federal courts ruled bus segregation unconstitutional. On January 7, 1957, the Tallahassee City Commission repealed the city’s bus segregation law. (see Nov 13)
Charles Mingus

October 20 Peace Love Activism

October 20, 1960: Charles Mingus records “Fables of Faubus” with lyrics for his Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus album for release on independent label after Columbia Records had refused to release it with lyrics.  The song was written as a direct protest against Arkansas governor Orval E. Faubus  who in 1957 had sent out the National Guard to prevent the integration of Little Rock Central High School by nine African American teenagers. (see Oct 25)

Lyrics:
Oh, Lord, don’t let ’em shoot us!

Oh, Lord, don’t let ’em stab us!

Oh, Lord, don’t let ’em tar and feather us!

Oh, Lord, no more swastikas!

Oh, Lord, no more Ku Klux Klan!

 Name me someone who’s ridiculous, Dannie.

Governor Faubus!

Why is he so sick and ridiculous?

He won’t permit integrated schools.

Then he’s a fool! Boo! Nazi Fascist supremists!

Boo! Ku Klux Klan (with your Jim Crow plan)

 Name me a handful that’s ridiculous, Dannie Richmond.

Faubus, Rockefeller, Eisenhower

Why are they so sick and ridiculous?

 Two, four, six, eight:

They brainwash and teach you hate.

H-E-L-L-O, Hello.

March to Montgomery
October 20, 1965: Roy Reed in the NY Times reported that, ”an all-white jury dominated by self-proclaimed white supremacists was chosen...for the retrial of Collie Leroy Wilkins, Jr, a Ku Klux Klansman charged with the murder of Viola Liuzzo.” (NYT article) (see Oct 22)
Murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner
October 20, 1967: an all-white jury convicted seven conspirators, including the deputy sheriff, and acquitted eight others. It was the first time a white jury convicted a white official of civil rights killings. For three men, including Edgar Rice Killen, the trial ended in a hung jury, with the jurors deadlocked 11–1 in favor of conviction. The lone holdout said that she could not convict a preacher. The prosecution decided not to retry Killen and he was released. None of the men found guilty would serve more than six years in prison. (BH, see Oct 28; Murders, see Dec 29)
BLACK & SHOT
October 20, 2014: Officer Jason Van Dyke followed in his car 17-year-old McDonald before shooting him 16 times in the middle of Pulaski Road on the Southwest Side. It will be more than a year before the video of the incident is released. (B & S, see Nov 20; Van Dyke, see November 19, 2015)
The Red Scare
October 20, 1947: the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) on this day opened its famous hearings into alleged Communist influence in Hollywood. The hearings began with a series of “friendly” witnesses who argued that there was Communist influence. The “friendly” witnesses included President of Screen Actors Guild and future U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who testified on October 23, 1947. Ayn Rand testified regarding the pro-communist slant of the film Song of Russia. (see Oct 23)

October 20 Music et al

“Monster Mash”

October 20 Peace Love Activism

October 20 – November 2, 1962: “Monster Mash” by Bobby "Boris" Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers #1 Billboard Hot 100.

Peter, Paul, and Mary
October 20 – November 30, 1962: Peter, Paul, and Mary’s Peter, Paul, and Mary is Billboard’s #1 album.

Ken Kesey

October 20 Peace Love Activism

October 20, 1966: Ken Kesey arrested. (NYT article) (see Oct 31)

October 20 Peace Love Activism

October 20, 1969: John Lennon and Yoko Ono released their third album, Wedding Album. According to Lennon, It was like our sharing our wedding with whoever wanted to share it with us. We didn't expect a hit record out of it. It was more of a... that's why we called it Wedding Album. You know, people make a wedding album, show it to the relatives when they come round. Well, our relatives are the... what you call fans, or people that follow us outside. So that was our way of letting them join in on the wedding.”  Wedding Album commemorated their wedding in Gibraltar on 20 March 1969. Although it was the final installment in their trilogy of avant garde and experimental recordings, the couple continued to document their lives on tape until Lennon's death in 1980. (see Nov 1)

John & Yoko
October 20, 1973: John Lennon filed suit asking the court to force the Immigration and Naturalization Service to produce the records under which deportation decisions were made. (see Oct 29)(NYT article)
Mark David Chapman
October 20, 1980: Mark David Chapman quit his security job and signed out for the last time. Instead of the usual "Chappy" he wrote "John Lennon". Chapman would murder Lennon on December 8th of this year outside his New York City home. (see Nov 17)
October 20 Peace Love Activism

Vietnam

Benjamin Spock

October 20 Peace Love Activism

October 20, 1967: Dr Benjamin Spock turned in a briefcase full of what he said were draft cards to officials at the Justice Department building here and later accused one of them of being "derelict in his duty" for not having arrested him. He said he wanted to be arrested in order to precipitate a "moral, legal confrontation" with the Government over the draft. Justice Department officials said later that the briefcase had contained draft cards and other matter. (Vietnam, see Oct 21 -22; DCB, see January 5, 1968)

Watergate Scandal

October 20, 1973: “Saturday Night Massacre”. Solicitor General Robert Bork fired Watergate Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox at the direction of President Richard Nixon after Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Assistant Attorney General Ruckelshaus had refused and resigned. (see Oct 20)

Iran hostage crisis

October 20, 1979: the U.S. government allowed the deposed Shah of Iran to travel to New York for medical treatment. (see Nov 4)

US Labor History

October 20, 1980: Presidential candidate Ronald Reagan wrote to PATCO President Robert Poli with this promise: if the union endorsed Reagan, "I will take whatever steps are necessary to provide our air traffic controllers with the most modern equipment available and to adjust staff levels and work days so that they are commensurate with achieving a maximum degree of public safety." He got the endorsement. Nine months after the election (see August 5, 1981) he fired the air traffic controllers for engaging in an illegal walkout over staffing levels and working conditions. (see June 12, 1981)

AIDS

October 20, 2000: Robert D Ray (see August 28, 1987) died. (see July 7 > 12, 2002)

LGBTQ

October 20, 2010: Barack Obama's administration announced it would also appeal the judge's ruling on the constitutionally of Don't ask, don't Tell even though Obama announced earlier in the year that he wished to end the policy. (see Nov 1)

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Monday 19 October

emma goldman 1890October 19, 1890, Anarchism in the US and Emma Goldman :  Goldman (age 21) spoke in Baltimore to members of the International Working People's Association in the afternoon. She later spoke in German to the Workers' Educational Society at Canmakers' Hall. Michael Cohn and William Harvey also speak. This is the first lecture by Goldman to be reported in the mainstream press.

lucy burnsOctober 1917, Feminism & Voting Rights: Lucy Burns, inspired by several Socialist Party suffrage prisoners, led a campaign in prison demanding suffragists be treated as political prisoners; she threatened a hunger strike if the demand was not met. The petition was secretly circulated among inmates, smuggled out, and presented to commissioners of District of Columbia. Every woman signing petition put in solitary confinement.

 

in October 1926, Anarchism in the US and Emma Goldman: after being deported to Russia in 1919 (and becoming disillusioned there) Goldman moved to Great Britain  and later marrying a British citizen, With British citizenship, Goldman sailed for Canada to lecture; its proximity to the US rekindled her hope for readmission to the U.S.

 

MLK arrestedOctober 19, 1960, BLACK HISTORY &  MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR: King was arrested along with students, eventually numbering 280, after conducting mass sit-ins at Rich’s Department Store and other Atlanta stores. The others were freed, but the judge sentenced King to four months in prison. Legal efforts secured his release after eight days. A boycott of the store followed, and by the fall of 1961, Rich’s began to desegregate.

 

wed am s & G

October 19, 1964: Simon & Garfunkel released Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. Initially a flop, but after release of their second album, Sounds of Silence in 1966, it hit #30 on the Billboard charts.


agnew
October 19, 1969, Vietnam: Vice President Spiro T. Agnew referred to anti-Vietnam War protesters "an effete corps of impudent snobs."

 

October 19, 1973: after President Nixon requested Congress appropriate $2.2 billion in emergency aid for Israel,  Libya, Saudi Arabia and other Arab states proclaim an embargo on oil exports to the United States.

 

An Iranian command and control platform is set afire after being shelled by four US Navy destroyers. The shelling is a response to a recent Iranian missile attack on a reflagged Kuwaiti super tanker.

October 19, 1987, TERRORISM: two U.S. warships shelled an Iranian oil platform in the Persian Gulf in response to Iran's Silkworm missile attack on the U.S. flagged ship MV Sea Isle City. (click → NYT article)

 

October 19, 2009, Marijuana:  the Department of Justice issued a memo, known subsequently as the Ogden memo, to "provide clarification and guidance to federal prosecutors in States that have enacted laws authorizing the medical use of marijuana."  In an effort to make the most efficient use of limited resources, the DOJ announced that prosecutorial priorities should not target "individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana." Specifically, individuals with cancer or other serious illnesses who use medical marijuana and the caregivers who provide the medical marijuana in accordance with state law should not be the focus of federal prosecution. The memo clarified that "prosecution of commercial enterprises that unlawfully market and sell marijuana for profit continues to be an enforcement priority." It is also explicitly stated that the memo "does not 'legalize' marijuana or provide a legal defense to a violation of federal law." (click → NYT article)

 

October 19, 2010, LGBT: US Federal Judge struck down the appeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell by the Department of Justice. The US Military begins accepting applications for gay service members. Don't ask, don't tell temporarily ends. (click → NYT article)
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October 13 Peace Love Activism

October 13 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Poll tax
October 13, 1942: the U.S. House passed legislation abolishing poll taxes in national elections, but in the Senate, Southern senators filibustered, blocking the bill. Over the next several years, the House continued to pass the legislation — only to be blocked again by the Senate. (see Oct 20)
Vivian Malone Jones
October 13, 2005: Vivian Malone Jones died in Atlanta. She was 63. Her husband, Mack Jones, had died in 2004. (Black History, see February 2006; U of A, see Jan 17, 2013)

Cold War

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

October 13 Peace Love Activism, 

October 13, 1952:  the US Supreme Court announced that it had declined to grant certiorari in the appeal of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, condemned to death for conspiracy to commit atomic espionage for the Soviet Union. (RS, see Oct 17; Nuclear, see Nov 1; Rosenbergs, see June 19, 1953)
Nixon/Kennedy debates
October 13, 1960, Richard M. Nixon and John F. Kennedy participated in the third televised debate of the presidential campaign, with Nixon in Hollywood, Calif., and Kennedy in New York.

October 13 Music et al

Beatles

October 13 Peace Love Activism, 

October 13, 1963: although The Beatles' popularity had been growing steadily and to increasingly frantic heights throughout 1963, their appearance at the London Palladium catapulted them into the attention of the mainstream media.

Sunday Night At The London Palladium was a variety entertainment program that regularly drew huge British TV audiences of up to 15 million people. Competition to appear was fierce, and The Beatles were taking no chances, having spent the previous evening rehearsing.

On the night they appeared briefly at the beginning of the show, before compère Bruce Forsythe told the audience, "If you want to see them again they'll be back in 42 minutes." And indeed they were. The Beatles topped the bill that night, closing the hour-long show. They began with From Me To You, followed by I'll Get You, which was introduced by Paul McCartney with some jovial interjections from John Lennon. Their most recent hit, She Loves You, was next, announced collectively by Lennon, McCartney and George Harrison. Then came the finale. Paul McCartney attempted to announce it, but was drowned out by the screams from the frenzied audience. Lennon told them to "shut up", a gesture which was applauded by the older members in the audience. McCartney then asked them all to clap and stamp their feet, and they began Twist And Shout.

The Beatles' appearance featured on the ITN news, complete with footage from the group's dressing room. The following day, meanwhile, newspaper reporters wrote front-page stories about the screaming fans. (see Oct 17)

Bob Dylan
October 13, 2016: the Nobel Prize committee announced it had awarded Dylan the Nobel Prize in Literature "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition".(see Nov 16)

Vietnam

DRAFT CARD BURNING

October 13 Peace Love Activism, 

October 13, 1966: the conviction of David J Miller, the first person arrested in the country for burning his draft card (see previously Oct 15, 1965) was upheld by the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. The court held that Congress had the right to enact a law against destroying a draft card so long as it did not infringe on a constitutional right. (DCB, see December 12, 1966)
Robert S. McNamara

October 13 Peace Love Activism, 

October 13, 1966: Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara declared at a news conference in Saigon that he found that military operations have "progressed very satisfactorily since 1965." (see Oct 24)

Feminism

October 13, 1967: President Lyndon B. Johnson had issued Executive Order 11246, establishing affirmative action in employment for all federal agencies and contractors on September 24, 1965. He deliberately did not include women in the order, however, despite the fact that sex discrimination was specifically prohibited by Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (signed on July 2, 1964). Although he was deeply committed to the civil rights movement, LBJ had no similar commitment to the women’s rights movement that emerged in the mid-1960s. Leaders of the reinvigorated women’s rights movement protested Johnson’s omission of women from his first E.O., and on this day, Johnson issued Executive Order 11375 to include women in affirmative action.

The pressure came from the revived feminist movement in the 1960s. See the publication of Betty Friedan’s influential book, The Feminine Mystique (and the critical review by the New York Times on April 7, 1963), and the founding of the National Organization for Women (NOW) on June 30, 1966. (see January 15, 1968)
October 13 Peace Love Activism

US Labor History

Columbia University strike
October 13, 1985: more than 1,100 office workers strike Columbia University in New York City. The mostly female and minority workers win union recognition and pay increases. (see June 19, 1986)
National Basketball Association
October 13, 1998: the National Basketball Association canceled regular season games for the first time in its 51-year history, during a player lockout.  Player salaries and pay caps were the primary issue.  The lockout lasted 204 days. (see July 14, 1999)

LGBTQ

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell
October 13, 2010: A federal judge ordered the United States military to stop enforcing the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law that prohibited openly gay men and women from serving.

Judge Virginia A. Phillips of Federal District Court for the Central District of California issued an injunction banning enforcement of the law and ordered the military to immediately “suspend and discontinue” any investigations or proceedings to dismiss service members.

In language much like that in her Sept. 9 ruling declaring the law unconstitutional, Judge Phillips wrote that the 17-year-old policy “infringes the fundamental rights of United States service members and prospective service members” and violates their rights of due process and freedom of speech. 

The federal government appealed the ruling. (NYT article) (see Oct 19)

Native Americans

October 13 Peace Love Activism, 

October 13, 2014: Seattle’s Mayor Ed Murray signed a proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day and by so doing the city of Seattle no longer celebrated the “Columbus Day” holiday. (see February 21, 2015)

Nuclear/Chemical News

October 13, 2017: President Trump declared his intention not to certify Iran’s compliance with the nuclear deal agreement of 2015. By doing so, he left it to Congress to decide whether and when to reimpose sanctions on Iran, which would end the agreement.

The Administration made it clear that it wanted to leave the accord intact, for the moment. Instead, it asked Congress to establish “trigger points,” which would prompt the United States to reimpose sanctions on Iran if it crossed  thresholds set by Congress.

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