Tag Archives: Bob Dylan

New Year New Music

New Year New Music

The 1960s was a great decade for January music

New Year New Music

in January 1960: John Coltrane released “Giant Steps” album, considered a classic jazz album and one that saxophonists still measure themselves by today. Linsey Planer at AllMusic.com writes: History will undoubtedly enshrine this disc as a watershed the likes of which may never truly be appreciated. Giant Steps bore the double-edged sword of furthering the cause of the music as well as delivering it to an increasingly mainstream audience." (full article...Allmusic)

New Year New Music

in January 1961: Two Steps from the Blues album by Bobby “Blue” Bland released. Bland was an original member of the Beale Streeters and was sometimes referred to as the "Lion of the Blues". Along with such artists as Sam Cooke, Ray Charles, and Junior Parker, Bland developed a sound that mixed gospel with the blues and R&B. An imitator of Frank Sinatra, he was also known as the “Sinatra of the blues”, his music being influenced by Nat King Cole. Bland was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1981, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.

in January 1962, Bob Dylan: Dylan wrote  “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues
Well, I was feelin’ sad and feelin’ blue
I didn’t know what in the world I wus gonna do
Them Communists they wus comin’ around
They wus in the air
They wus on the ground
They wouldn’t gimme no peace . . . So I run down most hurriedly
And joined up with the John Birch Society
I got me a secret membership card
And started off a-walkin’ down the road
Yee-hoo, I’m a real John Bircher now!
Look out you Commies! Now we all agree with Hitler’s views
Although he killed six million Jews
It don’t matter too much that he was a Fascist
At least you can’t say he was a Communist!
That’s to say like if you got a cold you take a shot of malaria Well, I wus lookin’ everywhere for them gol-darned Reds
I got up in the mornin’ ’n’ looked under my bed
Looked in the sink, behind the door
Looked in the glove compartment of my car
Couldn’t find ’em . . . I wus lookin’ high an’ low for them Reds everywhere
I wus lookin’ in the sink an’ underneath the chair
I looked way up my chimney hole
I even looked deep down inside my toilet bowl
They got away . . .
Well, I wus sittin’ home alone an’ started to sweat
Figured they wus in my T.V. set
Peeked behind the picture frame
Got a shock from my feet, hittin’ right up in the brain
Them Reds caused it!
I know they did . . . them hard-core ones Well, I quit my job so I could work all alone
Then I changed my name to Sherlock Holmes
Followed some clues from my detective bag
And discovered they wus red stripes on the American flag!
Ol’ Betsy Ross . . . Well, I investigated all the books in the library
Ninety percent of ’em gotta be throwed away
I investigated all the people that I knowed
Ninety-eight percent of them gotta go
The other two percent are fellow Birchers . . . just like me Now Eisenhower, he’s a Russian spy
Lincoln, Jefferson and that Roosevelt guy
To my knowledge there’s just one man
That’s really a true American: George Lincoln Rockwell
I know for a fact he hates Commies cus he picketed the movie Exodus Well, I fin’ly started thinkin’ straight
When I run outa things to investigate
Couldn’t imagine doin’ anything else
So now I’m sittin’ home investigatin’ myself!
Hope I don’t find out nothing . . . good God!

January 1, 1962, The Beatles before their US appearance: The Beatles and Brian Poole and the Tremeloes both auditioned at Decca Records, a company which has the option of signing one group only. Decca told The Beatles that "guitar groups" were on the way out and did not offer them a contract and signed The Tremeloes instead. Other record companies turned the Beatles down as well. One of the songs the Beatles sang was Hello Little Girl, the first song written by John Lennon (in 1957).

January 1, 1963, The Beatles began a concert tour of Scotland.

New Year New Music

January 1 – 7, 1966: “The Sounds of Silence” by Simon and Garfunkel #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. (see Wednesday Morning 3am)

New Year New Music
Roots of Rock
January 1, 1967: FM stations were no longer allowed to simply simulcast their AM counterpart. Birth of “underground “ rock radio.

New Year New Music, New Year New Music, New Year New Music, 

Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles

Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles

August 28, 1964

Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles

She Loves You

         The Beatles initial successes were great pop songs that many youth fell in love with at a time when they themselves were looking to fall in love. She Loves You, I Want to Hold Your Hand, Please Please Me, I Feel Fine, She's a Woman, and We Can Work It Out are all loves songs. Some happier than others. Someone once told me, if it's a happy Beatle song, Paul wrote it; a sad one, John. While a generalization, it's more often true than not.

Maggie’s Farm

       When I first heard Bob Dylan's "I Ain't Gonna' Work on Maggie's Farm No More" I was only a touch less confused about its lyrics than "Gates of Eden" a song I had no idea what was happening other than Dylan was trying to harmonize with songs the lonesome sparrow sings.

       Maggie's Farm? Well there's a guy obviously praying for rain, getting terribly underpaid, and whose boss is putting out his cigar on the guy's face. I'd quit too.

       Of course, that's not what Dylan was saying. He was saying he wasn't going to be the acoustic-folk-protest song-singer too many expected him to permanently be. Quitting. He was going  electric. And on July 25, 1965 he did just that at the Newport Folk Festival. 

       Many were displeased.

August 28, 1964

       The Beatles began their first full American tour on August 18 at the San Francisco Cow Palace. Ten days later they played for 16,000 fans at the Forest Hills Stadium in Queens, New York City. They did the same the next night.

       It was what happened in between that changed history.

Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles

August 28, 1964

       Al Aronowitz was a writer who knew Bob Dylan and arranged for him to meet the Beatles at their hotel the night after that first concert. Aronowitz later wrote: "The Beatles' magic was in their sound,...Bob's magic was in his words. After they met, the Beatles' words got grittier, and Bob invented folk-rock."

       At hat meeting , cannabis may have been the source of all that musical cross pollination. The Beatles apparent unfamiliarity with the herb apparently surprised Mr Dylan, already experienced. [The four had tried it in Germany, but it did not impress them.]

       Apparently, Ringo was unfamiliar with the not-Bogarting-that-joint protocol and kept things to himself. John, Paul, and George soon learned the etiquette.

1965

  • On March 27, Dylan released Bringing It All Back Home on which “Maggie’s Farm” appears.
  • The Byrds’ covering of Dylan, particularly “Mr Tambourine Man” open the door for folk-rock.
  • July 25, 1965 Dylan played Newport Folk Festival. Many in audience booed his performance for playing electric set with The Paul Butterfield Blues Band.
  • August 30, 1965,  Dylan released Highway 61 Revisited. More electric.
  • August 28, 1965 Dylan played at NYC’s Forest Hills Tennis Stadium. More boos during his electric set. 
  • December 3, 1965 the Beatles released Rubber Soul. The course of pop music changed.

Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles, 

Another Side of Bob Dylan

Another Side of Bob Dylan

Recorded in one session, June 9, 1964

Released on August 8, 1964

another-side back

Another Side of Bob Dylan

             Columbia realized by 1964 that Bob Dylan was a star. Although his first album, the eponymous  Bob Dylanhad barely sold in it's first year (2,500 copies), Dylan's song writing skills and reputation among fellow folk artists grew quickly.

             Another Side of Bob Dylan was his fourth album and each was a step further in his development. That first album was not really "his" album having written only two of the thirteen songs.

             This album was all his.

The tracks

Side one

  1. All I Really Want to Do
  2. Black Crow Blues
  3. Spanish Harlem Incident
  4. Chimes of Freedom
  5. I Shall Be Free No. 10
  6. To Romona

Side two

  1. Motorpsycho Nitemare
  2. My Back Pages
  3. I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Have Met)
  4. Ballad in Plain D
  5. It Ain’t Me Babe
             Dylan was changing his tone. He said of this album that "there aren't any finger-pointing songs." His style was more poetic than previous works. He served as the turn signal in pop music. What a musician writes can me much more personal.

Maggie’s Farm

             It will be at the 1965 Newport Folk that Dylan will take his next step away from folk-protest and go electric. The Paul Butterfield Blues Band will accompany him as well as the Newport Boos.

             He "...ain't gonna' work on Maggie's Farm no more." 

             And I thought the song was about some guy tired of farm work.

1965

             Think of 1965. By December the Beatles will have released Rubber Soul and when the Beatles changed bands and record companies followed. The bands perhaps as much as in self-expression as their search for success; the record companies in search of a better bottom line.

To Ramona

             When Dylan sang "To Ramona" at Newport in 1965 he introduced the song, he said, "This is called 'To Ramona.' Ramona. It's just a name."

             Today we realize its much more than "just a name." 

             Dylan's relationship with New York City girlfriend and political muse Suzy Rotolo (see Freewheelin' Bob Dylan) had ended with a 1963 abortion. His ongoing relationship with Joan Baez, who had brought him to the attention of the Newport crowd in 1963, 

             Now the relationship with Baez was fading and she was much more than "just a name."

Everything passes
 Everything changes
 Just do what you think you should do
 And someday, maybe
 Who knows, baby
 I'll come and be cryin' to you.