Tag Archives: April 12 Peace Love Activism

April 12 Peace Love Activism

April 12 Peace Love Activism

US Labor History

Puddlers
April 12, 1858: a group of "puddlers"—craftsmen who manipulated pig iron to create steel—met in a Pittsburgh bar and formed The Iron City Forge of the Sons of Vulcan. It was the strongest union in the U.S. in the 1870s, later merging with two other unions to form what was to be the forerunner of the United Steel Workers. (see January 10, 1860)
Auto-Lite strike
April 12, 1934: the Toledo (Ohio) Auto-Lite strike begins with 6,000 workers demanding union recognition and higher pay. The strike was notable for a 5-day running battle in late May between the strikers and 1,300 members of the Ohio National Guard. Known as the "Battle of Toledo," the clash left two strikers dead and more than 200 injured. The 2-month strike, a win for the workers’ union, is regarded by many labor historians as one of the nation’s three most important strikes. (LH, see May 9; Toledo, see May 23)

Technological Milestone

Polio vaccine

April 12 Peace Love Activism

April 12, 1955: researchers announced the polio vaccine was safe and effective and it quickly became a standard part of childhood immunizations in America. In the ensuing decades, polio vaccines would all but wipe out the highly contagious disease in the Western Hemisphere. (see June 29, 1956)

Space Race

Yuri Gagarin

April 12 Peace Love Activism

April 12, 1961: the first human in space. Vostok 1 carried Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into orbit. The Soviets refer to Gagarin as a "cosmonaut." The Americans had considered "cosmonaut" as a title but had already settled on "astronaut." (see May 2)

BLACK HISTORY

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR
April 12, 1963: police arrested King, Reverend Abernathy and Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth for leading a demonstration in defiance of an injunction obtained by Bull Connor. Dr. King was placed in solitary confinement and refused access to counsel. During his incarceration, he penned his "Letter from the Birmingham Jail," a response to a statement by eight leading local white clergymen -- Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish -- who had denounced him as an outside agitator and urged blacks to withdraw their support for his crusade. In this eloquent statement, Dr. King set forth his philosophy of nonviolence and enumerated the steps that preceded the Gandhian civil disobedience in Birmingham. Specifically citing Southern segregation laws, he wrote that any law that degraded people was unjust and must be resisted. Nonviolent direct action, Dr. King explained, sought to foster tension and dramatize an issue "so it can no longer be ignored." (see Apr 16)

Malcolm X

April 12, 1964: in Detroit, Michigan, Malcolm X delivered the "The Ballot or the Bullet." speech. (BH, see Apr 14; MX, see February 14, 1965)

Rainey Pool

April 12 Peace Love Activism

April 12, 1970: a group of white men beat Rainey Pool, 54, a one-armed sharecropper from Midnight. They dumped his body in the Sunflower River. Two days later police found Pool’s body. Police arrested gour men and charged them with assault and murder. One man confessed. (Black History, see May 11; Poole, see July, 1970

April 12 Music et al

Roots of Rock
April 12, 1954: Bill Haley and the Comets recorded "(We're Gonna) Rock Around The Clock." It was included as the B-side of “Thirteen Women” also recorded that day. The record—with “Thirteen Women” as the A-side, will only be a moderate success. (see May 7)
“Last Thoughts on Woody Guthrie”
April 12, 1963: at New York's Town Hall Bob Dylan recited "Last Thoughts on Woody Guthrie," a long evocation of old memories, a youth searching for himself by the railroad tracks, down the road, in fields and meadows, on the banks of streams, in the "trash can alleys." And, he says, somehow during that search Woody was his companion. There's this book comin' out, an' they asked me to write something about Woody...Sort of like "What does Woody Guthrie mean to you?" in twenty-five words...

And I couldn't do it -- I wrote out five pages and... I have it here, it's...Have it here by accident, actually... but I'd like to say this out loud...So... if you can sort of roll along with this thing here, this is called... (see Bob Dylan Woody Guthrie Last Thoughts for audio and lyrics) (see May 12)
The Byrds
April 12, 1965: The Byrds released their first single, Bob Dylan's Mr Tambourine Man. It will become the Billboard #1 on June 26. (see May 8)
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
April 12, 1968:  after nearly two months in Rishikesh, India, studying Transcendental Meditation with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, John Lennon and George Harrison left the camp. Also with them were Cynthia Lennon, Pattie Harrison and their friend 'Magic' Alex Mardas. They had decided to leave after Mardas convinced the others that Maharishi had attempted to gain sexual favours from female meditators at the camp. The accusation was likely unfounded. (see May 19)
Fifth Dimension
April 12 – May 23, 1969: “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In” by the Fifth Dimension #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.
Road to Bethel
April 12, 1969: Mel Lawrence and Tom Rounds arrived in NY. They had organized rock concerts in Hawaii, the Fantasy Fair, and had organized Miami Pop in 1968. (see April 13)

Vietnam

April 12, 1966: NY Stock Exchange hit with anti-war leaflets. (see April 13)

Watergate Scandal

April 12 Peace Love Activism

April 12, 1996: historian, Stanley I. Kutler won a legal victory that would lead to the slow but steady release of more than 3,000 hours of secretly recorded Nixon White House tapes. In a deal struck with the estate of former President Richard M. Nixon and the National Archives, the first set of the tapes -- more than 200 hours chronicling the abuses of power known collectively as the Watergate scandals – were to be released by November, 1996. The agreement came 21 years after Congress ordered that the tapes be made public.

                Kutler his lawyer, Alan Morrison of the advocacy group Public Citizen, and the National Archivist, John Carlin, said that the rest of the tapes, which cover almost everything of importance that Mr. Nixon and his aides said at the White House, at the Old Executive Office Building next door and at Camp David, Md., from February 1971 to July 1973, when their existence was disclosed, will gradually be released in the coming years. (see May 31, 2005)

LGBTQ

April 12, 2012: A U.S. federal grand jury issued the first-ever indictment to charge a violation of the sexual orientation section of the federal hate crimes law. According to the indictment, David Jason Jenkins and Anthony Ray Jenkins, 20, enlisted two women to trick Kevin Pennington into getting into a truck with the defendants, so that the defendants could drive Pennington to a state park and assault him. According to the indictment, the defendants then drove Pennington a secluded area of the Kingdom Come State Park in Kentucky and assaulted him.

The indictment charged the men with committing a hate crime in violation of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, (see April 25, 2012)

 

Please follow and like us: