Category Archives: Peace Love Art and Activism

September 8 Peace Love Activism

September 8 Peace Love Activism

Cold War

Korea divided
September 8, 1945: U.S. troops land in Korea to begin their postwar occupation of the southern part of that nation, almost exactly one month after Soviet troops had entered northern Korea to begin their own occupation. Although the U.S. and Soviet occupations were supposed to be temporary, the division of Korea quickly became permanent. NYT article (see Nov 16)
SEATO
September 8, 1954: the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization  formed. It was an international organization for collective defense in Southeast Asia created by the Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty, or Manila Pact. It was primarily created to block further communist gains in Southeast Asia. (see Nov 27)

BLACK HISTORY

Clyde Kennard
September 8, 1959: in 1955, Clyde Kennard, a black U.S. Army veteran and Mississippi native, had attempted to enroll in Mississippi Southern College, an all-white public university in the city of Hattiesburg. Mr. Kennard's credentials met the criteria for admission, but his application was denied because he was unable to provide references from five alumni in his home county.

In December 1958, in a letter to a local newspaper, Mr. Kennard announced his intent to re-apply to the university. In response, the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission – a state agency formed to protect segregation – hired investigators to research Mr. Kennard's background and uncover details that could be used to discredit him; these attempts were unsuccessful. Soon after, Mr. Kennard withdrew his application after the governor of Mississippi personally requested that he do so.

On September 8, 1959, Mr. Kennard once again tried to apply for admission to Mississippi Southern College. In a letter written to the college's administration, he declared that, if again rejected, he would sue the University for denying him admission based on his race. After he unsuccessfully tried to register for courses on September 15, 1959, Mr. Kennard was charged with illegal possession of alcohol.

Despite this legal retaliation, Mr. Kennard continued his attempts to register at Mississippi Southern. In September of 1960, he was arrested and charged with assisting in stealing $25 worth of chicken feed from a local store. Although there was little evidence against him, an all-white jury convicted him of being an accessory to burglary, and he was sentenced to seven years in state prison. BH, see January 5, 1960; Kennard, see July 4, 1963)
James H Meredith
September 8, 1965: Columbia University Law School accepted Meredith. (BH, see Sept 24; Meredith, see June 5, 1966)

Black Panthers

September 8 Peace Love Activism

September 8, 1968: a jury deliberated for four days and in the end come up with a compromise verdict, convicting Huey Newton of voluntary manslaughter. He was acquitted of the assault charge and the kidnap charges were dropped. FBI director J. Edgar Hoover declared the Black Panther Party "greatest threat to the internal security of the country". (see Sept 28)
BLACK & SHOT
September 8, 2015: the city of Baltimore reached a $6.4 million settlement in a lawsuit filed by the family of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old man black man who died in April after suffering a critical injury while in police custody. The settlement plan would go to the city's spending oversight board on the following day for formal approval, the mayor's office said. Gray's death triggered sometimes violent protests, accompanied by devastating looting and arson in Baltimore, and prompted a national outcry. It ultimately led to the firing of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. (see Nov 15)

Consumer Protection

September 8, 1961: statistical evidence linking heavy smoking with heart disease was reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Drs. Daniel J Nathan and Dr. David M. Spain had studed 3,000 men. They found that for smokers of over 40 cigarettes daily and aged under 51 years, their chance of having coronary heart disease almost doubled. Further, among those studied that had coronary heart disease, 57% of heavy smokers suffered heart attacks, as compared to only 31% of light smokers. The doctors said it remained an "open question" whether the statistics were proof that heavy smoking was a cause of hardening of coronary arteries. Only a four-sentence article on page 3 appeared in the New York Times. (see January 11, 1964)

US Labor History

United Farm Workers

September 8 Peace Love Activism

September 8, 1965: Filipino American grape workers walk out on strike against Delano, California, table and wine grape growers, protesting years of poor pay and working conditions. Latino farm workers soon joined them, and the strike and subsequent boycott lasted more than five years (see Sept 16, 1965)
NJ Unions
September 8, 2015: another 16 New Jersey public worker unions asked the U.S. Supreme Court to consider whether the state's highest court erred by declaring a pension funding agreement between the state and employees unenforceable.

In a petition filed with the U.S. Supreme Court, lawyers for 16 labor groups — including the New Jersey Education Association, Communications Workers of America and the Policemen's Benevolent Association — argued that the New Jersey Supreme Court should have applied the protections of the federal Contract Clause to the deal.

Hetty Rosenstein, state director for the CWA, that the organizations will "leave no stone unturned."

"One way or another we will protect these pensions. We will never allow the state of New Jersey to destroy the pensions that 800,000 people depend on," she said. (see Dec 4)

Cultural Milestone

September 8 Peace Love Activism

September 8, 1966: the TV series "Star Trek" premiered on NBC. (see February 5, 1967)
September 8 Peace Love Activism

Watergate Scandal

September 8, 1974: though never indicted of any crimes, Gerald Ford gave an unconditional pardon to Richard Nixon.  [Ford's pardon proclamation] (see Oct 4)

Religion and Public Education

SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE
September 8, 1981: voters in the Clear Creek, Iowa, school district voted overwhelmingly on this day to reject a proposal to make the Bible a textbook in the district’s schools. The vote was 689 to 90. The Iowa Civil Liberties Union hailed the vote as a victory over “religious zealots.” (Religion, see January 6, 1983; Separation, see January 6, 1983)

Dissolution of Yugoslavia

INDEPENDENCE DAY
September 8, 1991: the Republic of Macedonia becomes independent. (Yugo, see Oct 8; ID see Sept 9)

Iraq War II

September 8, 2006:  a Senate report faulted intelligence gathering in the lead-up to the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. NYT article (see Nov 5)

Terry Jones

September 8, 2010:  Jones remained steadfast, claiming he has received more than 100 death threats and that he has begun carrying a pistol. That evening, Imam Muhammad Musri emerges from a meeting with Jones, saying he is hopeful Jones will change his mind. (see Sept 9)

Occupy Wall Street

September 8 Peace Love Activism

September 8, 2011: “Chris” launched the Tumblr page, "We Are the 99 Percent," (see Sept 17)

Westboro Baptist Church

September 8 Peace Love Activism
September 8, 2014: a new billboard with the message "Gods Loves Gays" debuted in Topeka, Kansas, the home city of the Westboro Baptist Church. "The Facebook God," a satirical Facebook page with more than 1.7 million "likes," raised more than $80,000 on the crowd-funding platform Indiegogo in order to mount the billboard. "This hate group goes around saying that God hates gay people," an animated depiction of God says in a YouTube video uploaded to the Indiegogo page. "Nonsense! I love gay people. These Westboro psychos protest at the funerals of soldiers, murdered children and more. How dare they!" (see March 24, 2016)

LGBTQ

September 8, 2015: Kim Davis was released from jail on Tuesday but would not say whether she would begin issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, was not at work the next day. A lawyer for Ms Davis, Mathew D Staver, said Ms. Davis would “return soon.”. After spending five nights in jail, he said, Ms Davis “needs some rest and time with the family.”

Ms. Davis spoke at a rally after she was ordered freed, saying: “I just want to give God the glory. His people have rallied, and you are a strong people.” Kim Davis has emerged as a heroine to religious conservatives.

The Federal District Court judge who ordered Ms. Davis detained, David L Bunning, said she could go free because her office was “fulfilling its obligation to issue marriage licenses to all legally eligible couples.” But he warned Ms Davis not to interfere “directly or indirectly, with the efforts of her deputy clerks to issue marriage licenses to all legally eligible couples.” (see Sept 14)

September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  September 8 Peace Love Activism,  

Please follow and like us:

September 6 Peace Love Activism

September 6 Peace Love Activism

US Labor History

Avondale Mine disaster
September 6, 1869: one of the worst disasters in the history of U.S. anthracite mining occurred at the Avondale Mine, near Scranton, Pa., when a fire originating from a furnace at the bottom of a 237-foot shaft roared up the shaft, killing 110 miners. (see Dec 28)
National textile strike of 1934

September 6 Peace Love Activism

September 6, 1934: strikebreakers and special deputies opened fire on the 300 textile workers picketing the Chiquola Mill in Honea Path, South Carolina, killing six people and wounding dozens of others; a seventh man died the next day from his wounds. The national textile strike of 1934 saw nearly half a million textile workers from New England, the Mid Atlantic, and the South walk off the job to demand better wages and working conditions. (see Sept 12)

Anarchism in the US

September 6, 1901: Leon Czolgosz, a Polish citizen associated with the Anarchist movement  shot President William McKinley twice in the stomach while McKinley was attending the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. McKinley had been greeting the public in a receiving line. Czolgosz later confessed to the crime, signing a statement saying that the last public speaker he had heard was Emma Goldman, but added she had never told him to kill the president. (Biography article) (see Sept 10, 1901)

Cultural Milestone

September 6 Peace Love Activism

September 6, 1916: Clarence Saunders opened the first self-service grocery store, Piggly Wiggly, in Memphis, Tenn. (see October 28, 1919)

BLACK HISTORY

Emmett Till
September 6, 1955: Emmett Till was buried at Burr Oak Cemetery. The same day, a grand jury in Mississippi indicted Milam and Bryant for the kidnapping and murder of Emmett Till. They both plead innocent. They will be held in jail until the start of the trial.  (see Emmett Till)
Mississippi Southern College
September 6, 1965: after previous failed attempts, Clyde Kennard, Raylawni Young Branch, and Elaine Armstrong became the first African-American students enrolled at Mississippi Southern College (now University of Southern Mississippi). Branch had served as Forrest County NAACP secretary and as an active member of SNCC, CORE and SCLC. (see Sept 8)
Atlanta riot
September 6, 1966: 4 days of rioting in Atlanta, GA. Authorities blamed without evidence SNCC and its leader Stockley Carmichael. (BH, see Sept 12; RR, see June 2, 1967)

Women’s Health

September 6 Peace Love Activism

September 6, 1966: Margaret Sanger, the most famous advocate of birth control in American history, died on this day at age 86. She opened the first birth control clinic in the US, on October 16, 1916, and was arrested for doing so a week later, along with her sister. She rejected a plea bargain and served one month in jail. Sanger’s career as a birth control advocate was filled with many dramatic events in addition to her arrest and jailing. Her magazine, Woman Rebel, was banned from the mails.  After her release from jail in 1917, she produced a short film, Birth Control, which had one private showing on May 16, 1917, after which it was banned. No print is known to survive. She was prevented from speaking on a number of occasions. Sanger’s organization, the American Birth Control League, evolved into today’s Planned Parenthood Federation. (NYT obit) (see April 6, 1967)

INDEPENDENCE DAY

September 6 Peace Love Activism

September 6, 1968: Swaziland independent from United Kingdom. (see Oct 12)
September 6 Peace Love Activism

see Jimi Hendrix for more

September 6, 1970: Hendrix played at the Love and Peace Festival on the Isle of Fehmarn in Germany. He was supposed to play the day before but couldn't because of bad weather. The festival was not very successful financially and many of the scheduled bands didn't perform. Hendrix decided to stick around. He had been paid in advance. There were only about 10,000 people that saw him perform. They did not realize that they were  watching history being made. It was the last concert Jimi would ever play. (see Sept 16)

Technological Milestone

September 6, 1978: US scientists announced the production of human-type insulin by a strain of E. coli bacteria, that had been genetically engineered after months of creative use of gene-splicing techniques. The work was a joint effort by research teams in California at the biochemical firm, Genentech Inc, San Francisco and the City of Hope National Medical Center, Los Angeles. A normal body's production of insulin takes place within cells of the pancreas, programmed by certain genes (segments of DNA). The scientists synthesized copies of these genes and inserted them into a weakened lab strain of the intestinal microbe Escherichia coli. In 1982, insulin was the first recombinant DNA drug to be marketed, Humulin by Eli Lilly & Co (see July 2, 1979)

Marijuana

September 6, 1988: Administrative law judge Francis Young was asked by the Drug Enforcement Administration in 1988 to comment on the merits of rescheduling marijuana in response to NORML's 1972 petition. Young suggested that marijuana be rescheduled from schedule I to schedule II for nausea associated with cancer chemotherapy. He also concluded that the evidence was insufficient to warrant the use of crude marijuana for glaucoma or pain. (see December 30, 1989)

LGBTQ

September 6, 2005: the California legislature became the first state legislature to pass a freedom to marry bill. The landmark bill was vetoed soon after passage by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Two years later, the legislature again passed a marriage bill, and again, it was vetoed by Gov. Schwarzenegger. (California, see May 15, 2008; LGBTQ, see Oct 1, 2005)

Terry Jones

September 6, 2010:  an Afghan imam in Kabul convenes a demonstration in which protesters burn an effigy of Jones and chant "Death to America." (see Sept 7)

Stop and Frisk Policy

September 6, 2011: a day after being stopped and detained by the NYPD, City Councilman Jumaane Williams and others urge for reforms to the stop-and-frisk policy. (see Oct 19)

September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  September 6 Peace Love Activism,  

Please follow and like us:

September 3 Peace Love and Activism

September 3 Peace Love and Activism

September 3 Peace Love Activism

September 3, 1838, BLACK HISTORY: Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery in Baltimore. He became a leading abolitionist and later published his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself.

 

September 3 Peace Love Activism
Crazy Horse
September 3, 1855, Native Americans: General William Harney and 700 soldiers took revenge for the so-called “Grattan Massacre” and attacked a Sioux village in Nebraska that left 100 Native American men, women, and children dead. For the rest of his life Harney was plagued with the nickname of "Squaw Killer Harney." One Sioux boy who witnessed the brutal massacre would never forget or forgive and would take his own revenge 21 years later at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. His name was Crazy Horse.
September 3, 1891, BLACK HISTORY & US Labor History: African-American cotton pickers organize and strike in Lee County, Texas, against miserably low wages and other injustices, including a growers’ arrangement with local law enforcement to round up blacks on vagrancy charges, then force them to work off their fines on select plantations. Over the course of September a white mob put down the strike, killing 15 strikers in the process.

September 3, 1916, US Labor History: Adamson Act: The Adamson Act establishes an 8-hour workday for employees of interstate railroads, with overtime for working longer hours.

September 3, 1950, Vietnam: a U.S. Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) of 35 men arrived in Saigon to screen French requests for American military aid, assist in the training of South Vietnamese troops, and advise on strategy.

September 3 Peace Love Activism

September 3, 1955, BLACK HISTORY & Emmett Till: Till's body was taken to Chicago's Roberts Temple Church of God for viewing and funeral services. Emmett's mother decided to have an open casket funeral. Thousands of Chicagoans wait in line to see Emmett's brutally beaten body.
September 3, 1964, Environmental Issues: from the UPI article: President Johnson today signed into law the wilderness conservation bill -- a gift from the present generation to the future of 9 million acres of woodland recreation areas. In a White House bill-signing ceremony, Johnson termed the event "a very happy and history occasion for all who love the out of doors, and that includes me." Under the wilderness bill, 61 million acres of woodland eventually could be preserved in the same state as when Indians roamed the land. Most of the 9 million acres immediately covered is in the Western states.

September 3 Peace Love Activism

September 3, 1967, Cultural Milestone: last episode of the TV show The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet airs on ABC. The show is still the longest running live-action (non-animated like The Simpsons) American sitcom in television history (14 Seasons, 435 Episodes).
September 3, 1968, The Beatles after live performances:  after "quitting" the Beatles on August 22, Ringo Starr rejoined the group. He later stated: I got a telegram saying, 'You're the best rock'n'roll drummer in the world. Come on home, we love you.' And so I came back. We all needed that little shake-up. When I got back to the studio I found George had had it decked out with flowers - there were flowers everywhere. I felt good about myself again, we'd got through that little crisis and it was great. And then the 'White' album really took off - we all left the studio and went to a little room so there was no separation and lots of group activity going down. Although Ringo's return from Sardinia was much celebrated, there was little for him to do in this recording session, which took place in Abbey Road's studio two from 7pm until 3.30am the following morning. George Harrison worked alone, recording a backwards guitar solo for While My Guitar Gently Weeps.

September 3 Peace Love Activism

September 3, 1971, LSD : Albert Hofmann, the father of LSD  and LSD's most vocal prophet, and Timothy Leary met in Lausanne, Switzerland, while Leary was there in exile from the United States. Leary facing a possible ten year prison sentence for charges related to possession of a small amount of cannabis.

 

September 3 Peace Love Activism

Also on this date, LSD impregnated paper ("blotter") first hit the streets. Very quickly the paper began being printed with colorful art.  Blotter paper begins to emerge as the most common form of LSD sold on the street. Previously it had been tablets and powder, but blotter and gel-tabs proved more consistent in purity and potency.

September 3 Peace Love Activism

September 3, 1991, US Labor History: unable to escape a fire at the Imperial Poultry processing plant in Hamlet, N.C. twenty-five workers died. Managers had locked fire doors to prevent the theft of chicken nuggets. The plant had operated for 11 years without a single safety inspection.
September 3, 1996, IRAQ: the U.S. launches Operation Desert Strike against Iraq in reaction to the attack on Arbil.

September 3, 2014, LGBT: the organizers of the New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade announced that they were lifting a ban on gay groups participating in the march, ending a policy that had prompted protests, court battles and bitter debate for decades.

The decision to allow a gay group to march under its own banner came as Mayor Bill de Blasio threatened to once again boycott the parade and the organizers faced pressure from employees of NBC Universal, which broadcasts the festivities.

One of the event’s biggest sponsors, Guinness, pulled out last year and more companies threatened to follow. The Irish government also threatened not to send a delegation unless the policy changed, according to an official familiar with the negotiations.

Christine C. Quinn, the former speaker of the City Council, who is gay and has long fought to have the policy changed, said that the ban had been a personal affront. “To have the parade point a finger and say to me and others, ‘You’re not as good as these other Irish people,’ has been very, very painful,” Ms. Quinn said. “That is now coming to an end.”

September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  September 3 Peace Love Activism,  

Please follow and like us: