Category Archives: Today in history

September 14 Peace Love Activism

September 14 Peace Love Activism

Anarchism in the US

President McKinley

September 14 Peace Love Activism

September 14, 1901: President McKinley died of a gangrenous infection stemming from his (Sept 6) wounds. (NYT article) (see Sept 24, 1901)
Eugene V. Debs
September 14, 1918: in Cleveland Eugene V. Debs was sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment for violating the Espionage Act. (see Oct 16; Debs, see March 10, 1919)

 

September 14 Music et al

see Tutti Frutti for more
September 14, 1955: after some lyric adjustments (such as from "Tutti frutti, good booty" to "Tootie frutti, all rooty"), Little Richard recorded Tutti Frutti.

Bob Dylan
September 14, 1961: Dylan met John Hammond at a rehearsal session for Carolyn Hester at the apartment shared by Hester and her then-husband, Richard Fariña. Hester had invited Dylan to the session as a harmonica player, and Hammond approved him as a session player after hearing him rehearse, with recommendations from his son, musician John P. Hammond, and from Liam Clancy. (see Sept 26)
September 14 Peace Love Activism

Space Race

Luna 2

September 14 Peace Love Activism

September 14, 1959: the Soviets' Luna 2 successfully crash-landed on the moon, becoming the first man-made object to reach another planetary body. (article) (see Oct 4)

Zond 5

September 14, 1968: the Soviet Union sends Zond 5 around the moon and back to Earth in an unmanned test of their circumlunar spacecraft. The craft carried tortoises, "wine flies, meal worms, plants, seeds, bacteria, and other living matter." (article) (see Oct 11 – 12)

US Labor History

Landrum-Griffin Act

September 14 Peace Love Activism

September 14, 1959: President Eisenhower signed the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, also known as the Landrum-Griffin Act. The law addressed the union corruption uncovered by Senator John L. McClellan. It held labor leaders to stricter standards in handling union funds and required them to file annual reports. (see March 16, 1960)
César E. Chávez
September 14, 1970: Courts ruled that Chávez was leading an illegal strike because it involved a jurisdictional dispute between two unions.  (see Oct 8, 1970)
Dolores Huerta
September 14, 1988: during a peaceful and lawful protest of the policies/platform of then-candidate for president George H.W. Bush, San Francisco Police officers severely beat Huerta resulting in several broken ribs and necessitating the removal of her spleen.

Huerta won a large judgment against the SFPD and the City of San Francisco, the proceeds of which were used for the benefit of farm workers. (see Nov 12, 1990)

Jack Kevorkian

September 14, 1995: Kevorkian arrived at the Oakland County Courthouse in Pontiac, Michigan in homemade stocks with ball and chain. He is ordered to stand trial for assisting in the 1991 suicides of Sherry Miller and Marjorie Wantz. (see Oct 30)

BLACK HISTORY

September 14, 201: the sister of a James C Anderson (see June 26, 2011), asked prosecutors not to pursue the death penalty against anyone accused of her brother’s murder. (JCA, see March 22, 2012; BH, see Sept 21)

LGBTQ

Kim Davis
September 14, 2015: (from the NYT) Undaunted in her religious faith but facing the specter of another courtroom reckoning, Kim Davis, the Rowan County clerk, who was jailed for defying a federal judge’s order that she issue marriage licenses, said Monday that she would not stop her employees from processing licenses for same-sex couples.

But the condition that Ms. Davis attached to her admittedly makeshift solution — that the licenses would lack her authorization — was an indication that her protracted legal and political battles would not go away soon. Ms. Davis’s strategy could spur new litigation to challenge the licenses, and it was unclear how Judge David L. Bunning of Federal District Court, who jailed Ms. Davis on Sept. 3, would respond. (see Sept 15)
Atlantic Coast Conference
September 14, 2016: the Atlantic Coast Conference announced that it would move neutral-site championships for this academic year, including its football title game in December and its women’s basketball tournament in March, out of North Carolina in reaction to a state law that curbed anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. (LGBTQ, see Sept 30; NC, see Dec 22)

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September 13 Peace Love Activism

September 13 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Revolts
September 13, 1663: first serious slave conspiracy in colonial America. White servants and black slaves conspired to revolt in Gloucester County, VA, but were betrayed by a fellow servant. (see article) (BH, see February 18, 1688; SR, see February 28, 1708)
Oberlin, Ohio citizens
September 13, 1858: a group of Oberlin, Ohio citizens stopped Kentucky slave catchers from capturing John Price, a black man. Oberlinians, black and white, pursued the abductors to nearby Wellington at word of Price’s kidnapping and took him back, later helping him across the Canadian border to freedom. (see Sept 17)
James H Meredith
September 13, 1962: the US District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi reordered the University of Mississippi to enroll Meredith. (see September 20, 1962)
Attica Prison Riot
September 13, 1971: state troopers dropped tear gas into the Attica prison while other troopers opened fire on a group of over 1,200 inmates. In the chaos, the police gunfire killed 10 hostages and 29 inmates Another 80 people were seriously wounded, the majority of them inmates, in what became the bloodiest prison uprising in U.S. history. Adding to the death toll were three inmates and a guard who had been killed earlier during the riot.

“We are men. We are not beasts, and we do not intend to be beaten or driven as such.” –L.D. Barkley, a 21 year-old prisoner serving time for breaching parole by driving without a license; he died in the assault, shot 15 times at point-blank range. (BH, see Sept 17; APR, see Sept 17)
 
George Wallace
September 13, 1998: George Wallace died. (see Sept 17)
School Desegregation
September 13, 2013: nearly a week after the University of Alabama came under fire for persistent segregation in its sorority system, school officials announced a deal that would clear the way for black women to be admitted to the school’s prestigious and historically white Greek organizations. The deal was the first step toward ending more than a century of systematic segregation in the school’s sorority system. (NYT obit) (BH, see Oct 15; SD, see March 21, 2014)
September 13 Peace Love Activism

Vietnam

September 13, 1945: in accordance with the Potsdam Agreements at the end of World War II, 5,000 British troops of the 20th Indian Division, commanded by Gen. Douglas Gracey, arrived in southern Indochina to disarm the defeated Japanese forces  Gracey detested the Viet Minh and rearmed some 1,400 French soldiers who had been imprisoned by the Japanese. This effectively was the first step in the re-establishment of French colonial rule and set the stage for the conflict between the French and the Viet Minh that led to a nine-year war. (see Sept 26)

September 13 Music et al

Payola
September 13, 1960: the Federal Communications act in the USA was amended to outlaw payments of cash or gifts in exchange for airplay of records. (see June 1, 1961)
Yesterday
September 13, 1965: Beatles released Paul McCartney 's composition 'Yesterday' as a single in the US. The final recording was so different from other works by The Beatles that the band members vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom. (However, it was issued as a single there in 1976.) (see Sept 25)
 
see Big Sur for more
September 13 – 14, 1969: Sixth Big Sur Folk Festival. Made into a movie: Celebration at Big Sur (Festival, see Oct 4; Big Sur, see Oct 3, 1970)
see Toronto Rock and Roll Revival for more
September 13, 1969: The Toronto Rock and Roll Revival (Varsity Stadium, at the University of Toronto) over 20,000 attended. The appearance of John Lennon, Yoko Ono and The Plastic Ono Band was not publicly known in advance. It was Lennon's first-ever public rock performance without one or more of the Beatles since meeting Paul McCartney in 1957. He decided before returning to England to leave the Beatles permanently. (Beatles, see Sept 20)
September 13 Peace Love Activism

Iran–Contra Affair

September 13, 1985:  Iran received 508 US-made Tow missiles, as part of secret arms-for-hostages deal with US. (see Jan 17, 1986)

ADA

September 13, 1988: the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 expands on the Civil Rights Act of 1968 to require that a certain number of accessible housing units be created in all new multi-family housing. The act covers both public and private homes and not only those in receipt of federal funding. (see March 12, 1990)

Feminism

September 13, 1994: the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (VAWA) signed by President Bill Clinton. The Act provided monies toward investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women, imposeed automatic and mandatory restitution on those convicted, and allowed civil redress in cases prosecutors chose to leave un-prosecuted. The Act also establisheed the Office on Violence Against Women within the Department of Justice. Its coverage extended to male victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. (Feminism, see, Sept 28, 1994; VAWA, see May 15, 2000)

DEATH PENALTY

September 13, 1994: President Clinton signed crime bill making dozens of federal crimes subject to death penalty. (see February 8, 1995)

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September 12 Peace Love Activism

September 12 Peace Love Activism

STUDENT ACTIVISM

September 12 Peace Love Activism

September 12, 1905: The Intercollegiate Socialist Society (ISS) began. It was a national non-party group dedicated to the organization of current and former collegians for the socialist cause and the spreading of socialist ideas on campus. (see December 2, 1964)

US Labor History

Woonsocket strike

September 12 Peace Love Activism

September 12, 1934: National Guardsmen fired on “sullen and rebellious” strikers at the Woonsocket (Rhode Island) Rayon plant, killing one and injuring three others. A correspondent said the crowd of about 2,000 “went completely wild with rage.” Word spread, 6,000 more workers arrived at the scene and the city was put under military rule. The governor declared that “there is a Communist uprising and not a textile strike” in the state  (see April 8, 1935)

BLACK HISTORY

Cooper v. Aaron
September 12, 1958:  the Supreme Court asserted the supremacy of the Constitution as the law of the land and the authority of the federal courts to enforce lawful court orders. The case arose from the 1957 conflict over the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, in the face of opposition from local officials and a pro-segregation mob.

Important as it was in terms of constitutional law, Cooper v. Aaron did not end the school integration crisis in Little Rock. The decision applied only to orders from the lower courts. In the summer of 1958, segregationists who controlled the Little Rock school board voted to close the schools rather than integrate them. Thus, in what is known as “the lost year,” the city’s public schools were closed for the 1958–1959 academic year. They reopened in the fall of 1959 after citizens and business leaders, concerned about the impact of closed public schools on the city’s future, captured control of the school board and reopened the schools. (additional info via PBS) (BH, see Sept 20; SD, see Sept 27)
Albany Movement
September 12, 1962: Martin Luther King Jr. decried the pace of civil rights progress in the United States. He also said that "no President can be great, or even fit for office, if he attempts to accommodate injustice to maintain his political balance." (see Sept 17)
Birmingham West End High School

 

September 12, 1963: white students in Birmingham, Alabama, drag an African American effigy past West End High School. Two African American girls attended the desegregated school and a majority of the white students were staying away from classes. Police stopped this car in a segregationist caravan in front of the school to caution them about fast driving and blowing auto horns in front of a school. (BH, see Sept 15; SD, see Oct 22)
Grenada, Mississippi
Twelve years after the United States Supreme Court's landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling holding school segregation unconstitutional, the city of Grenada, Mississippi, continued to operate a segregated school system. In August of 1966, a federal judge ordered that African American students be permitted to enroll in the formerly whites-only schools. Approximately 450 African American students enrolled prior to the scheduled start of the school year on September 2, 1966.

On September 2, the school district postponed the start of school by ten days. White leaders used that time to attempt to coerce African American parents into withdrawing their children from the white schools by threatening them with firing or eviction; as a result, 200 students withdrew.

On September 12, 1966, the Grenada schools opened, and 250 African American students attempted to integrate the schools. A large white mob surrounded the school and turned away most of the African American students. As the students retreated, members of the mob pursued them through the streets, beating them with chains, pipes, and clubs. At lunchtime, the mob returned to the school to attack the few African American students who had successfully entered. As the students left for lunch, members of the mob attacked them, leaving some hospitalized with broken bones. Reporters covering the story were also beaten.

The mob violence continued for several days, with no intervention from law enforcement. On September 16, a federal judge ordered protection for the students, and on September 17, thirteen members of the mob were arrested by the FBI. (BH, see Oct 15; SD, see May 27, 1968)
Boston
September 12, 1974: in Boston, opposition to court-ordered school busing turned violent on the opening day of classes. School buses carrying African-American children were pelted with eggs, bricks and bottles, and police in combat gear fought to control angry white protesters besieging the schools. The protests continued, and many parents, black and white, kept their children at home. In October, the National Guard was mobilized to enforce the federal desegregation order. (BH, see Oct 3; SD, see February 6, 1986)
Steven Biko

September 12 Peace Love Activism

September 12, 1977: Steven Biko died while in police custody. Police had driven him naked in a truck 700 miles to Pretoria where he died in a prison cell. (see Peter Gabriel – “Biko” (1980) (SA/A, see March 28, 1982; Biko, see January 28, 1997)

Space Race

September 12, 1962: President Kennedy gave a speech at Rice University, future home of the Manned Spacecraft Center (which later will be renamed Johnson Space Center) (see Dec 13)

In it he uttered the famous words:      We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.

September 12 Music et al

The Beatles
September 12, 1965: an August 14 taped performance broadcast on  "The Ed Sullivan Show." Taped before a live studio audience at Studio 50 in NY. The Beatles perform: 1) I Feel Fine 2) I'm Down 3) Act Naturally 4) Ticket to Ride 5) Yesterday 6) Help! (see Sept 13)
see The Monkees for more
September 12, 1966: the made-for-TV show band, The Monkees, premiered on NBC. (see Oct 10)

September 12 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

Maude
September 12, 1972:  Maude, a spin-off of All in the Family, premiered, starring Beatrice Arthur as Maude Findlay, a leftist feminist who supports abortion and civil rights. (see Feminism, Oct 25)

Malala Yousafzai
September 12, 2014: the Pakistani army announced that 10 Taliban militants who tried to kill teenage activist Malala Yousufzai for her outspoken views on girls’ education in the country’s troubled northwest in 2012 had been arrested. (see Oct 10)

Hurricane Katrina

September 12, 2005: in the wake of what was widely believed to be incompetent handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina by state, local and federal officials, FEMA director, Michael Brown, resigned, saying that it was "in the best interest of the agency and best interest of the president." His standing had also been damaged when the Boston Herald revealed his meager experience in disaster management before joining FEMA. (see Sept 15)

Nuclear/Chemical News

September 12, 2011:  Macoule nuclear site (France). One person is killed and four are injured - one with serious burns - after an explosion in a furnace used to melt down nuclear waste and recycle it for energy. No radiation leaks nor damage to the plant were detected. (see January 30, 2012)

Terry Jones

September 12, 2013:  after being arrested on September 11, Terry Jones was released from the Polk County Jail after posting a $1,250 bond. (see Oct 15)

LGBTQ

September 12, 2016: responding to a contentious North Carolina law that curbed anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, the N.C.A.A announced that it would relocate all championship tournament games scheduled to take place in the state over the coming academic year. Among the events affected was the Division I men’s basketball tournament, the N.C.A.A.’s most prominent annual event, which had six first- and second-round games scheduled to be played in Greensboro in March.

The announcement followed the N.B.A.’s decision in July to move its 2017 All-Star Game out of Charlotte but was seen as a particularly substantial blow to officials in North Carolina, where college basketball is central to the state’s culture and pride. North Carolina had hosted more men’s basketball tournament games than any other state, an N.C.A.A. spokesman said. (LGBTQ & NC, see Sept 14)

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