Category Archives: Cold War

September 19 Peace Love Activism

September 19 Peace Love Activism

Anarchism in the US

September 19 Peace Love Activism

September 19, 1892: Andrew Berkman is sentenced to twenty-two years in prison for the attempt on steel magnate Henry Clay Frick's life on July 23, 1892. (see June 1893)

 

BLACK HISTORY

September 19, 1955:  the kidnapping (only) trial of J W Milam and Roy Bryant opened in Sumner, Mississippi, the county seat of Tallahatchie County. Jury selection begins and, with blacks and white women banned from serving, an all-white, 12-man jury made up of nine farmers, two carpenters and one insurance agent was selected.

Emmett’s mother, Mamie Till Bradley, departed from Chicago's Midway Airport to attend the trial. (see Emmett Till)

Nuclear/Chemical News

Operation Plumbbob
September 19, 1957: the US detonated a 1.7 kiloton nuclear weapon in an underground tunnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a 1,375 square mile research center located 65 miles north of Las Vegas. The test, known as Rainier, was the first fully contained underground detonation and produced no radioactive fallout. A modified W-25 warhead weighing 218 pounds and measuring 25.7 inches in diameter and 17.4 inches in length was used for the test. Rainier was part of a series of 29 nuclear weapons and nuclear weapons safety tests known as Operation Plumbbob that were conducted at the NTS between May 28, 1957, and October 7, 1957. (related NYT article) (see Sept 29) 
Cuban Missile Crisis
September 19, 1962:  the United States Intelligence Board (USIB) approved a report on the Soviet arms buildup in Cuba. Its assessment, stated that some intelligence indicates the ongoing deployment of nuclear missiles to Cuba. The Soviet Union above ground nuclear test. 1.5 - 10 megaton. (CW/NN, see Sept 25; Cuban Missile Crisis, see Oct 7)

The Cold War

see No Disneyland for Krushchev for more

September 19 Peace Love Activism

September 19, 1959: Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev had arrived in the US on September 15 for a summit meeting with President Eisenhower. The Soviet leader indicated a desire to see Hollywood. September 19 began pleasantly enough, with a tour of the Twentieth Century Fox Studios. Khrushchev was taken to the sound stage for the movie "Can-Can" and was immediately surrounded by the cast of the film, including Shirley MacLaine and Juliet Prowse. The cast members performed a number from the film. Frank Sinatra was brought in to serve as an unofficial master of ceremonies later lunched with an obviously delighted Khrushchev.

Later Twentieth Century Fox President Spyros P. Skouras introduced Khrushchev at Los Angeles Town Hall. Skouras, an ardent anticommunist, irritated Khrushchev by referring to the premier's famous statement that Russia would "bury" capitalism. Skouras declared that Los Angeles was not particularly interested in "burying" anyone, but would meet the challenge if posed. Khrushchev's famous temper quickly flared. He charged that Skouras's remarks were part of a campaign to heckle him during his trip to America.

Khrushchev's anger increased when he learned that he would not be allowed to visit Disneyland. Government authorities feared that the crowds would pose a safety hazard for the premier. 

Khrushchev, still fuming about the debate with Skouras, exploded. "And I say, I would very much like to go and see Disneyland. But then, we cannot guarantee your security, they say. Then what must I do? Commit suicide? What is it? Is there an epidemic of cholera there or something? Or have gangsters taken hold of the place that can destroy me?" (see Sept 25)

Teenage Culture

September 19 – 25, 1960: “The Twist” by 18-year-old Chubby Checker #1 Billboard Hot 100 (see January 1962). The song was written by Hank Ballard and originally the B-side of Hank Ballard & the Midnighters’ “Teardrops on Your Letter” in 1959. 
 Checker was born Ernest Evans. His boss nicknamed him Chubby. He made a private recording, “The Class,” on which he imitated many singers of the time including Fats Domino. The record was given to Dick Clark whose wife, after Ernest Evans said his nickname was Chubby, asked, “As in Checker?” referring to Fats Domino. The name stuck. (see “in March 1963”)  
September 19 Peace Love Activism

Vietnam

September 19, 1969: President Nixon announced the cancellation of the draft calls for November and December. He reduced the draft call by 50,000 (32,000 in November and 18,000 in December). This move accompanied his twin program of turning the war over to the South Vietnamese concurrent with U.S. troop withdrawals and was calculated to quell antiwar protests by students returning to college campuses after the summer. (see Sept 23)

US Labor History

September 19, 1973: a judge sentenced Aubran W Martin, one of the three gunmen convicted  in the 1969 Yablonski family murders, to die in the electric chair. (Yablonski, see April 8, 1974; Labor, see Nov 12)

INDEPENDENCE DAY

September 19 Peace Love Activism

September 19, 1983: Saint Kitts and Nevis independent of the United Kingdom. (see January 1, 1984)

Sexual Abuse of Children

September 19, 2002: the Boston Archdiocese reached a $10m settlement with victims of John Geoghan, retracting a previous settlement of $30m which the Church said would have bankrupted the archdiocese. (NYT article) (see Oct 7)

Hurricane Katrina

September 19 Peace Love Activism

September 19, 2005: Louisiana’s official death toll stood at 973. (see Sept 21)

LGBTQ

Don’t ask, don’t tell

September 19 Peace Love Activism

September 19, 2011: the US military’s “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy officially ended.  (see Sept 20, 2011)

September 19, 2012: the one-year anniversary of the end of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy passed with little notice because the policy had been so quickly implemented with so little disruption. Gay, lesbian and bisexual service members were thought to make up at least 2 percent of the military’s 2.2 million forces on active duty, in the reserves, and the National Guard. (see October 18, 2012)

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September 17 Peace Love Activism

September 17 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Dred Scott

September 17, 1858: Scott did not live very long to enjoy his freedom. He died of  tuberculosis less than two years after he achieved freedom. (Dred Scott, see June 17, 1876; BH, see February 14, 1859)
Louis Armstrong
September 17, 1957: jazz musician Louis Armstrong angrily announced that he would not participate in a U.S. government-sponsored tour of the Soviet Union. Armstrong was furious over developments in Little Rock, Arkansas, where mobs of white citizens and armed National Guardsmen had recently blocked the entrance of nine African-American students into the all-white Central High School. (BH, see Sept 25; CW, see Nov 7)
High Hopes Baptist Church
September 17, 1962: High Hopes Baptist Church near Dawson, Georgia was burned to the ground. It is the 4th "Negro Church" to be set ablaze. Three white men later admitted burning the church. They were sentenced to seven-year prison terms.. The homes of five Black families had also been burned. (see BH, see Sept 20; AM, see Sept 25)
Weather Underground
September 17, 1971: the Weathermen launched a retaliatory attack on the New York Department of Corrections, exploding a bomb near Correctional Services Commissioner Russell G. Oswald's office. The communique accompanying the attack called the prison system 'how a society run by white racists maintains its control,' with white supremacy being the 'main question white people have to face'" and saying that the Attica riots are blamed on Gov. Nelson Rockefeller. (NYT article) (BH, see Oct 2; APR, see December 30, 1976; WU, see January 29, 1975)
George Wallace
September 17, 1998: George Wallace buried. James Hood traveled from his home in Madison, Wis., to attend the funeral in Montgomery, Alabama. (Black History, see Feb 23; U of A, see Oct 13, 2005)

Technological Milestone

September 17, 1931: the first long-playing record, a 33 1/3 rpm recording, was demonstrated at the Savoy Plaza Hotel in New York by RCA-Victor. The venture was doomed to fail however due to the high price of the record players, which started around $95 (see Nov 26)

September 17 Music et al

Elvis
August 28 – September 17, 1961: Elvis Presley’s Something for Everybody is Billboard #1 album.  (see Dec 18)
 
News Music
September 17, 1965: Time magazine launched its coverage of antiwar songs in the article, “Rock ‘n’ Roll: Message Time,” which quoted from the nineteen-year-old P. F. Sloan’s best-selling song “Eve of Destruction.” Barry McGuire, the former lead singer for the New Christy Minstrels, recorded the song, and in late August, his record had begun to appear in the pop charts. Within a few weeks, it had reached Number 1, and then began to fade. Protest had seemingly become fashionable. Sloan would later recall,  “The media frenzy over the song tore me up and seemed to tear the country apart,”. Josh Dunson, a member of the Broadside group, interpreted the broader impact: ‘Eve of Destruction’ is the first protest song dealing in specifics to reach the non-college-educated sector of the population. It is awkward and full of holes, but the earnestness with which it was bought by hundreds of thousands and blocked by dozens of stations might indicate a large segment of the young population other than college students is dissatisfied with our war policy abroad and double standard at home. (see Sept 24)
Musical Cultural Milestone: Doors
September 17, 1967: The Doors appear on The Ed Sullivan Show and perform "Light My Fire". Sullivan had requested that the line "Girl we couldn't get much higher" be changed for the show. Jim Morrison agreed, but ended up performing it the way it was written and The Doors are banned from the show.

Musical Cultural Milestone: The Who
September 17, 1966: that same night The Who appeared on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. They played 2 songs, "I Can See For Miles" and "My Generation". At the end of “My Generation”, Pete Townshend started smashing his amp and Keith Moon had his drum set rigged to explode which did cut Moon’s leg & singed Pete Townshend’s hair, along with doing damage to Townshend’s hearing. (Rolling Stone magazine article)(see October 2, 1967)
 

September 17 Peace Love Activism

Vietnam

September 17, 1972: The comedy series "M.A.S.H." premiered on CBS. Though set during the Korean War, its stories obviously paralleled and often mocked the ongoing Vietnam war. (see Oct 12)
September 17 Peace Love Activism

Native Americans & Russell C Means

September 17, 1974: Federal District Court Judge Fred Nicol reprimanded the prosecution, the Justice Department and particularly the Federal Bureau of investigation and then dismissed the charges against' Russell C Means and Dennis J Banks. (Wounded Knee, see January 30, 1989; Native Americans, see January 4, 1975)

Feminism

Vanessa Williams
September 17, 1983: Vanessa Williams became the first African American Miss America. Midway through her reign, on July 23, 1984, Williams relinquished her crown due to controversy over nude photographs of her that appeared in Penthouse magazine.  (see July 19, 1984)
Malala Yousafzai
September 17, 2015: police reported that Saeed Naeem Khan, who was a public prosecutor in the Malala Yousufzai attack case, escaped an attempt on his life on in Saidu Sharif in Swat district. (Feminism, see Dec. 3; Malala, see April 10, 2017)

Jack Kevorkian

September 17, 1998: videotapes appear of the voluntary euthanasia of Thomas Youk, 52, who was in the final stages of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (see Nov 3)

Sexual Abuse of Children

September 17, 2002: Boston Jesuit priest James Talbot charged with raping and assaulting three teenaged students. (see Sept 19)

Iraq War II

September 17, 2003:  President Bush conceded there was no evidence linking Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to the September 11, 2001 attacks. (see Oct 19)
September 17 Peace Love Activism

Occupy Wall Street

Beginning…
September 17, 2011, Occupy Wall Street began. Approximately one thousand protesters marched on Wall Street in response to high unemployment, record executive bonuses, and extensive bailouts of the financial system. It was a Saturday and as usual, Wall Street was mostly closed. By the afternoon Zuccotti Park became the central location and camp for the protesters. The “people’s mic” became an effective way to communicate to the large groups, i.e. a speaker talks, those closest to the speaker repeat loudly what is said, those in back of the front repeat again, and so forth. (see Sept 20)
 
One year later…
September 17, 2012: from the NY Times: More than 100 arrests were reported on Monday, the first anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement, as protesters converged near the New York Stock Exchange and tried to block access to the exchange. (see Sept 26)

Stop and Frisk Policy

September 17, 2013: Judge Shira Scheindlin said she will not put an overhaul of the New York City police department’s controversial stop-and-frisk program on hold because of an appeal. Scheindlin ordered changes after finding the program discriminates against minorities. She said that granting the city's request would send the wrong signal. (see October 31)
FREE SPEECH & Student Rights
September 17, 2014: rejecting free speech arguments from parents, Republican lawmakers, and conservative groups, a federal appeals court refused to reconsider a ruling that found a South Bay high school had the legal right to order students wearing American-flag adorned shirts to turn them inside out during a 2010 Cinco de Mayo celebration.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals let stand its February ruling in favor of Live Oak High School administrators, who argued that a history of problems on the Mexican holiday justified the decision to act against the American flag-wearing students. Officials at the Morgan Hill school ordered the students to either cover up the shirts or go home, citing past threats and campus strife between Latino and white students that raised fears of violence.

A unanimous three-judge panel had found that the school's actions were reasonable given the safety concerns, which outweighed the students' First Amendment claims. "Our role is not to second-guess the decision to have a Cinco de Mayo celebration or the precautions put in place to avoid violence," the judges ruled.

The 9th Circuit decision relied heavily on the U.S. Supreme Court's 1969 precedent on when schools can cite safety concerns to justify taking action that might violate student free-speech rights. (FS, see Dec 22; SR, see March 30, 2015)

September 17 Peace Love Activism, September 17 Peace Love Activism, September 17 Peace Love Activism, September 17 Peace Love Activism, September 17 Peace Love Activism

 

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September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15 Peace Love Activism

Nuclear/Chemical News

Cold War
September 15, 1961: U.S. started underground nuclear testing with a series of nine low yield underground experiments at Yucca Flat with a further 62 tests there in 1962. The Soviet Union activity extended to a series of 50 detonations. (CW, see Sept 22; NN, see Oct 6)
Japanese reactors
September 15, 2013: Japan started the process of switching off its last working nuclear reactor for a scheduled inspection with no restart date in sight due to public hostility towards atomic power. (see Oct 22)
 Rice, Walli, and Boertje-Obed
September 15, 2015: Catholic peace activists Sister Megan Rice, Michael Walli and Greg Boertje-Obed were resentenced to time served for vandalizing a storage bunker that held much of the nation's bomb-grade uranium.

Rice, Walli, and Boertje-Obed were originally convicted of felony sabotage for their 2012 actions in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where they cut through fences and sneaked into the most secure area of the Y-12 National Security Complex. Once there, they hung banners, prayed and hammered on the outside wall of the bunker to symbolize a Bible passage that refers to the end of all war: "They will beat their swords into ploughshares."

Rice was sentenced to nearly three years in prison while Walli, 66, and Boertje-Obed, 60, were each sentenced to just over five years. (see January 6, 2016)

see September 15 Music et al for more

Pendletons
September 15, 1961, the Pendletons,  from Hawthorne, California, attend their first real recording session at Hite Morgan's studio in Los Angeles. The band recorded 'Surfin'. They changed their name to the Beach Boys. (see Dec 8)
Four Seasons
September 15 – October 19, 1962: “Sherry” by the Four Seasons #1 Billboard Hot 100. 
Otis Redding
September 15, 1965: Otis Redding released his Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul containing his composition “Respect”
Fear of Rock
September 15, 1970:Vice President Spiro Agnew stated that  American youth were being destroyed by rock music, the drug culture, and underground newspapers. (see March 27, 1971)

BLACK HISTORY

September 15, 1963
Virgil Ware

September 15 Peace Love Activism

While riding on the handlebars of his 16-year-old brother’s bicycle, near his family‘s home, 13-year-old Virgil Ware was killed on Docena-Sandusky Road, outside Birmingham, Alabama.  16-year old Larry Joe Sims shot at the Ware brothers while he was riding by on a motorbike with Michael Lee Farley. Sims shot Virgil twice,. Sims and Farley had just attended a segregationist rally. Both  were charged with first-degree murder, but an all-white jury convicted them on the lesser charge of second-degree manslaughter. Judge Wallace Gibson suspended the boys’ sentences and gave them two years probation. 
Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing
Birmingham, AL. 18 days after King’s speech, Bobby Frank Cherry, Thomas Blanton, Herman Frank Cash, and Robert Chambliss, members of United Klans of America, a Ku Klux Klan group, planted a box of dynamite with a time delay under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, near the basement. At about 10:22 a.m., twenty-six children were walking into the basement assembly room to prepare for the sermon entitled “The Love That Forgives,” when the bomb exploded. Four girls, Addie Mae Collins (aged 14), Denise McNair (aged 11), Carole Robertson (aged 14), and Cynthia Wesley (aged 14), were killed in the attack, and 22 additional people were injured, one of whom was Addie Mae Collins' younger sister, Sarah. The explosion blew a hole in the church's rear wall, destroyed the back steps and all but one stained-glass window, which showed Christ leading a group of little children. 

John Coltrane composed “Alabama” in response on Nov 18). The following year Joan Baez released “Birmingham Sunday” and Phil Ochs released “On Her Hand a Golden Ring” (BH, see Oct 2; Sixteenth Street, see Sept 26, 1977; CB, see June 16, 1964)

Muhammad Ali

September 15, 1965: Joe Namath took his Army physical. (BH, see Sept 24; Vietnam, see Sept 25; Ali (Namath), see December 9).
Ali/Spinks

September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15, 1978: exactly seven months after losing to Spinks, Ali rematch in the New Orleans Superdome. Ali defeated the younger Spinks, becoming boxing’s first three-time heavyweight champion. (Ali, see December 12, 1981, BH, see Sept 30)
Autherine Lucy Foster

September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15, 2017: the University of Alabama unveiled an historic marker honoring Autherine Lucy Foster, the first black student to be admitted to an all-white public school or university in Alabama. 

Foster attended the unveiling which was part of a larger campus ceremony at the College of Education.

Approximately 10% of the University of Alabama's students are black. Approximately 25% of the State's population is black.
September 15 Peace Love Activism

Environmental Issues

September 15 Peace Love Activism

September 15, 1970: Greenpeace was founded. (see Dec 2)

Weather Underground

September 15, 1970: the WUO helped Timothy Leary escape from the California Men's Colony prison. (see March 1, 1971)

US Labor History

UAW
September 15, 1970: more than 350,000 members of the United Auto Workers begin what is to become a 69-day strike against General Motors. (see June 8, 1971)
Joseph Yablonski
September 15, 1977: “Tony” Boyle pleaded not guilty at the opening of his second trial on the charge of murder in the Joseph Yablonski case. (see February 18, 1978)
NHL lockout
September 15, 2004: National Hockey League owners agreed to lock out the players. (The 2004-05 season was eventually canceled.) (see Oct 5)

Hurricane Katrina

September 15, 2005: President George W. Bush, addressing the nation from storm-ravaged New Orleans, acknowledged the government failed to respond adequately to Hurricane Katrina and urged Congress to approve a massive reconstruction program. (see Sept 19)

Great Recession of 2008

September 15, 2008: Lehman Brothers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, laying the catalyst for the global financial crisis.

Occupy Wall Street

September 15, 2012: on the first of three days of events planned for the one-year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, about 250 people marched down Broadway from Washington Square toward Zuccotti Park, accompanied by a large number of police officers on foot, in marked and unmarked cars, and riding scooters. (see Sept 17)

Iraq War II

September 15, 2009:  Muntader al-Zaidi  (see April 7, 2009)was released for good behavior, after serving nine months of the sentence. (see August 18, 2010)

LGBTQ

September 15, 2015: a federal appeals court denied Kim Davis’s motion to halt a requirement that she issue marriage licenses to gay couples.

"Davis has not demonstrated a substantial likelihood of success on her federal constitutional claims," the panel of judges said in their order denying the request. (Sept 21)

Marijuana

September 15, 2015: administrative Law Judge John S. Kennedy ruled that Lora Barbour, the mother of a Genny Barbour who had epilepsy, could not come to school to feed her daughter cannabis oil that had helped control her seizures. Kennedy said that state and federal drug possession laws trump their right to use medical marijuana on school grounds.

It was the third legal defeat for the Barbour Family of Maple Shade, NJ.

In addition to the conflicts in state and federal law, state Kennedy said the family failed to show their daughter Genny would suffer "irreparable harm" if denied medical marijuana in school, according to his 11-page decision.

"There are no doctor's reports from (Genny Barbour's) treating physician that would establish that her lunchtime dose of marijuana is medically necessary," Kennedy wrote. (NJ.com article) (M, see Oct 19; Barbours, see Nov 9)

September 15 Peace Love Activism, September 15 Peace Love Activism, September 15 Peace Love Activism, September 15 Peace Love Activism, September 15 Peace Love Activism, 

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