February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Native Americans

President Jefferson plans Native American removal

February 27, 1803: in a private letter to William Henry Harrison, Governor of the Indiana Territory, President Thomas Jefferson outlined an Indian policy that would result in the natives ceding land to the United States. He stated [my underlining]: To promote this disposition to exchange lands, which they have to spare and we want, for necessaries, which we have to spare and they want, we shall push our trading uses, and be glad to see the good and influential individuals among them run in debt, because we observe that when these debts get beyond what the individuals can pay, they become willing to lop them off by a cession of lands. He added, “…we presume that our strength and their weakness is now so visible that they must see we have only to shut our hand to crush them, and that all our liberalities to them proceed from motives of pure humanity only. Should any tribe be foolhardy enough to take up the hatchet at any time, the seizing the whole country of that tribe, and driving them across the Mississippi, as the only condition of peace, would be an example to others, and a furtherance of our final consolidation.” (complete letter from the National Archive site)  (see October 5, 1813)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Feminism

Voting Rights

February 27, 1922: in Leser v. Garnett the US Supreme Court held, that the Nineteenth Amendment to the US  Constitution had been constitutionally established. (Feminsim, see Sept 22; VR, see March 7, 1927)


February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

US Labor History

Woolworth’s

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27, 1937: four hundred fifty Woolworth’s workers and customers occupied a store in Detroit for eight days in support of Waiters and Waitresses Union. (see Mar 1)

Sit-down strikes

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27, 1939: the Supreme Court, in National Labor Relations Board v. Fansteel Metallurgical Corp., effectively outlawed sit-down strikes. (see June 5)

Montana Coal and Iron Company

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27, 1943: an explosion at the Montana Coal and Iron Company mine killed 74 workers. It was the worst mining disaster in Montana’s history. The small communities of Washoe and Bearcreek, Montana, consisted almost entirely of mine workers and their families. Many of them worked Smith Mine #3 for the Montana Coal and Iron Company. On a cold Saturday morning, February 27, 77 men were working in the mine when, at 9:30 a.m., a huge explosion rang out. The people of Washoe and Bearcreek heard the roar and then the long, wailing siren that followed. The exact cause of the explosion is not known, though some of the company’s miners claimed methane gas had built up in some abandoned shafts and was ignited after a cave-in. Of the 77 workers in the mine at the time of the explosion, only three made it out alive. (see May 31)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Calvin Graham


February 27, 1943: Graham turned himself in at the Houston recruiting station. (see Graham for expanded story)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Detroit

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism


February 27, 1943: with a cross burning in a field near the homes, 150 angry whites picketed the a Detroit housing project vowing to keep out any Black homeowners. (see Feb 28)

Wharlest Jackson

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism


The Armstrong Tire & Rubber plant in Natchez, Tennessee had offered Wharlest Jackson a promotion to its chemical mixing plant. Jackson had worked at the plant for 12 years and was also the treasurer of the local NAACP chapter.


On February 27, 1967, as Jackson was driving home from work, a bomb exploded in his 1958 Chevrolet truck, killing him instantly. The Natchez Police Department arrived on the scene and found Jackson’s truck blown to bits – the blast blew out the top of the truck, the front and rear glass, both doors and the hood.


The Natchez community was shocked and appalled by Jackson’s murder. Charles Evers and the Natchez NAACP organized a protest, leading 2,000 demonstrators to watch the changing of the shift at the Armstrong plant. From the Armstrong plant, the demonstrators marched to the place where Jackson died, and then to Rosehill Baptist Church, where they had an hour-long meeting. Even Governor Paul Johnson, infamously hostile to the NAACP, called Jackson’s murder “an act of savagery which stains the honor of our state.”


After Jackson’s death, the FBI launched an intensive probe that it quickly expanded to include other Klan-related murders and crimes. Investigators speculated that Jackson was a victim of the Silver Dollar Group, a violent, heavily armed cell of the Ku Klux Klan. The Silver Dollar Group had about 20 members, each of whom carried a silver dollar minted in the year he was born as evidence of membership in the cell. Several members had experience with explosives. The FBI identified Raleigh Jackson “Red” Glover, the leader of the Silver Dollar Group, as the primary suspect in both the Jackson and Metcalfe bombings.


No one was ever been convicted for the crime. (see Mar 2)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

February 27 Music et al


February 27 – March 19, 1961: “Pony Time” by Chubby Checker #1 Billboard Hot 100.

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Vietnam

South Vietnam Leadership

February 27, 1962: South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem survived another coup attempt when Republic of Vietnam Air Force pilots Lieutenants Pham Phu Quoc and Nguyen Van Cu tried to kill him and his brother Ngo Dinh Nhu by bombing and strafing the presidential palace. Lieutenant Quoc was arrested after his fighter-bomber crash-landed near Saigon. Lieutenant Cu fled to Cambodia, where he remained until November 1963.  (V, see “In July“; SVL, see Dec 2)

Walter Cronkite

February 27, 1968: the well-respected CBS TV news anchorman Walter Cronkite, who had just returned from Saigon, told Americans during his CBS Evening News broadcast that he was certain “the bloody experience of Vietnam was to end in a stalemate.” (see Mar 14)


STUDENT ACTIVISM

February 27 Peace Love Activism Feminism


February 27, 1969: police charged student picket lines, club and arrested two Chicano leaders at U.C. Berkeley; thousands rampage thru nine buildings at U of Wisconsin, Madison over black enrollments. (Vietnam, see March; SA, see April)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Religion and Public Education

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27 – 28, 1963:  Abington School District v. Schempp argued before the US Supreme Court In her opening statement Madalyn Murray, an atheist, said, in part:


Your petitioners are atheists and they define their beliefs as follows. An atheist loves his fellow man instead of god. An atheist believes that heaven is something for which we should work now – here on earth for all men together to enjoy. An atheist believes that he can get no help through prayer but that he must find in himself the inner conviction and strength to meet life, to grapple with it, to subdue it, and enjoy it. An atheist believes that only in a knowledge of himself and a knowledge of his fellow man can he find the understanding that will help to a life of fulfillment. He seeks to know himself and his fellow man rather than to know a god. An atheist believes that a hospital should be built instead of a church. An atheist believes that a deed must be done instead of a prayer said. An atheist strives for involvement in life and not escape into death. He wants disease conquered, poverty vanquished, war eliminated. He wants man to understand and love man. He wants an ethical way of life. He believes that we cannot rely on a god or channel action into prayer nor hope for an end of troubles in a hereafter. He believes that we are our brother’s keepers and are keepers of our own lives; that we are responsible persons and the job is here and the time is now.” (see June 17, 1963)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Native Americans

Russell C Means

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27, 1973: members of the Lakota Sioux tribe on the Pine Ridge reservation attempted to have Dick Wilson, the Bureau of Indian Affairs-backed head of the tribal administration, impeached, they received resistance from the federal government, which wanted to keep Wilson in power. Led by leader Russell Means, AIM seized control of Wounded Knee (site of the 1890 massacre) and the perimeter is placed under siege for 71 days.  (see Mar 2)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Sexual Abuse of Children

Rev. Bruce Ritter

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27,1990: the Rev. Bruce Ritter, celebrated leader of Covenant House for teen runaways, stepped down amid a scandal. He denied an accusation of molestation from one youth, but others step forward to accuse him and the Covenant House board reports extensive misconduct. Ritter’s Franciscan superiors in Rome approved a transfer to India, but outrage following a news report about the move forces the plan to be scrapped. 

Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

In 1991, the first Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests meeting was held at the Holiday Inn,  Chicago.


In 1992, Doubleday Books  published Jason Berry’s Lead Us Not Into Temptation: Catholic Priests and the Sexual Abuse of Children. In the forward, Rev. Andrew M. Greeley described the book’s content as revealing “what may be the greatest scandal in the history of religion in America and perhaps the most serious crisis Catholicism has faced since the Reformation” (see In July)


National Review Board

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27, 2004: the National Review Board, a lay panel formed by Catholic bishops, issued two studies documenting the molestation problem. One ws the first church-sanctioned tally of abuse cases, finding 10,667 abuse claims against about 4 percent of all American clerics from 1950 to 2002. The second report puts much of the blame on American bishops for not cracking down on errant priests. (see July 1)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

Environmental Issues

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism


February 27, 1990: Exxon and its shipping company were indicted on 5 criminal counts for the Exxon Valdez oil spill. (see Mar 22 )

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

IRAQ War I


February 27, 1991: President George H. W. Bush announced a ceasefire and that Kuwait had been liberated from Iraqi occupation. (see Mar 17)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

FREE SPEECH & The Red Scare


February 27, 1997: Frank Wilkinson, once banned from speaking at the University of North Carolina, returned to Chapel Hill to speak at the UNC Law School. (Frank Wilkinson site article) (FS, see December 23, 2003;  RS, see March 21, 1999)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

CLINTON IMPEACHMENT


February 27, 1998: White House communications aide Sidney Blumenthal refused to answer some of the questions posed before the grand jury, citing the controversy over whether the independent counsel can force aides to testify about conversations they had with the president. (see Clinton for expanded story)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

LGBTQ

Kentucky

February 27, 2014: U.S. District Court Judge John Heyburn ordered Kentucky officials to recognize the marriages of same-sex couples performed out of state.


Heyburn ruled that Kentucky’s Constitution and laws banning recognition of such marriages “violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution, and they are void and unenforceable.” The decision amounted to a final ruling of his Feb. 12 opinion in the case.


Attorney Dan Canon, a lawyer for the four gay and lesbian couples who won the case, said: “We are cautiously optimistic. The order has been granted without qualification and without a stay.”

Walt Disney World

February 27, 2014: Walt Disney World announced that it would no longer subsidize local chapters of the Boy Scouts of America, in response to the national organization’s continued ban on allowing LGBTQ troop leaders. (LGBTQ, see Mar 14; BSA, see May 20)

February 27 Peace Love Activism

Death Penalty


February 27, 2017: in an attempt to resume the death penalty after a nearly 12-year hiatus Akansas Gov Asa Hutchinson set execution dates for eight inmates on death row between April 17 and 27. Two men would be put to death on each of the four dates. If Arkansas followed through with that timetable, it would be carrying out the death penalty at a rate unmatched by any state since the United States resumed capital punishment in 1977.


                The hurried schedule appears to be influenced by the expiration of a lethal injection drug in the state’s supply. Arkansas uses three drugs in executions, and its stock of midazolam, a sedative injected to start of the process, would expire in April. Its supply of potassium chloride, the final drug in the series, expired in January, but the state has said it was confident it could acquire more. (Mercury News article) (DP, see Mar 27; Arkansas, see Apr 14)

February 27 Peace Love Art Activism

February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, February 27 Peace Love Activism, 

Please follow and like us: