Clinton Melton

Clinton Melton
Clinton Melton
Site of Clinton Melton murder, Glendora, Mississippi
Clinto Melton
On December 3, 1955, Clinton Melton was working in a gas station in Glendora, Mississippi. Otis Kimball, a cotton gin operator, drove in and told Melton to fill up his car. Something about the transaction angered Kimball and he threatened to come back to the gas station and kill Melton. Ironically, Kimball was driving the automobile of J. W. Milam, one of the men a jury had acquitted of killing Emmett Till just the previous August.  

Kimball returned with a shotgun and with no provocation and in full view of the gas station owner and other witnesses, he shot and killed Clinton Melton . 
Authorities charged Kimball with the murder. Kimball's lawyer argued self-defense. Lee McGarrh, the filling station owner, white, and Melton’s boss, testified that Melton did not have a gun and did not provoke the attack; John Henry Wilson, a black man testified that Kimball said he was going to kill Melton and would kill Wilson too if he got in the way; a third witness, standing ten feet away at the time, testified he did not see a gun in Clinton Melton’s hand.
Clinton Melton
Medgar Evers speaking with Clinton’s wife Beulah.
Witnesses for the defense – none of them eyewitnesses – included the sheriff, a deputy sheriff, and the chief of police. Kimball claimed Melton cursed at him during the argument. He claimed he had a scar from a bullet wound that came from a gunshot by Melton, and he produced a doctor who claimed it was indeed a gunshot wound. An all white jury acquitted Kimball after deliberating for four hours. (NYT article >>> Acquitted)
Just before scheduled commencement of the trial Beulah Melton, Clinton’s wife, died in a car accident. She drowned after her car ran off the road into the bayou.
Additional information about Clinton Melton case

My Generation Rubber Soul

My Generation Rubber Soul

December 3, 1965

Quite a day for rock history. On December 3, 1965 saw the release of both the Who's My Genration and The Beatles's Rubber Soul .

The albums' arrived before FM rock stations and I for one did not realize the importance of what was happening.  If someone had said that Nicky Hopkins had sat in on The Who's album, I'd have returned a blank look. There was no Rosko on New York's WNEW-FM to guide me. Not yet. In the meantime...

My Generation Rubber Soul

1965 was the beginning of the 60s music that will lead to the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. Bob Dylan has gone electric and he wasn't working on Maggie's farm no more. Bob shared his herbs and spices with the Fab Four (Bob Dylan Introduces the Beatles). Pop musicians were realizing that they can write what they feel, not just what they think you feel. And many musicians followed Dylan's lead and wrote their own songs.

 

My Generation Rubber Soul
My Generation album cover.
When the Who released their first album on December 3, 1965 (in the UK; the US won't hear it until April). Keith Moon was 19; Pete Townshend 20 ; Roger Daltry and John Entwistle both 21.  According to their site: The Who’s debut album was ...recorded in short bursts in April, October and November 1965, and for many tracks The Who were joined by Nicky Hopkins on piano. (for more, click through >>> My Generation)
I could give you a video of from the 65 album, but let's jump ahead almost four years to that little field party called the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. It's followed by "Naked Eye."

Rubber Soul

My Generation Rubber Soul

The Beatles were off the road and staying in the studio where they could find solace from fans.  All of Rubber Soul's songs were written after their last tour. The Beatles management knew about Christmas shopping and often released a new album in time for parents to get "that new album."
Nowadays, this might be my favorite of the album. I guess it's the most appropriate for my generation's rubber soul.

My Generation Rubber Soul. My Generation Rubber Soul. My Generation Rubber Soul