New York Is My Home

New York Is My Home

New York Is My Home
Dion and Paul Simon pose by the Brooklyn Bridge, New York Is My Home
New York Is My Home
Dion & Paul Simon
New York Is My Home
Dion, Runaround Sue cover
So this guy whose full name is Dion DiMucci, but let's just call him Dion because that is how you know him, right? He of the Bronx, NY. He lived near Belmont Avenue, thus the group name: The Belmonts and later Dion and the Belmonts. If you've ever visited the Museum at Bethel Woods Center for the Art, early in the Main Gallery you'll see the sleeve for his big September 1961 hit: Runaround Sue, a song he co-wrote with Ernie Maresca.

The Beatles and the British Invasion did a job on Dion and artists like him. He didn't disappear, by any means, but his name was no longer a household one. In 1968, he briefly returned to the limelight with Abraham, Martin, and John. 

If you asked him at any time though he'd say,  New York is my home.
New York Is My Home
Simon & Garfunkel’s album cover, Sounds of Silence
And another New Yorker by the name of Paul Simon, who teamed up famously with Art Garfunkel initially as Tom and Jerry, but then success came in the bright light of Bob Dylan's success as Simon and Garfunkel. Despite his Newark, NJ roots, if you asked him at any time since, he'd say New York is my home.

You'll also see Paul and Art on their 1966 Sounds of Silence album cover in the Museum, a little later on, near those brighter and more colorful album covers.

Now it's decades later and Dion has written a song called New York Is My Home and he asked his old Big Apple buddy Paul to sing along. Dion's voice is still smooth and wonderful and Paul's harmonies are right on. 

In a Rolling Stone magazine article, Kory Grow wrote: Dion originally wrote the tune as a solo recording, but soon realized he'd like to bring his old friend Simon into the fold. "We share a love for rock & roll street music the way it was done when we were kids," he says. "I knew Paul would get this song. And he did. Soon after I sent it to him, he called and said he'd become obsessed with it. He added his own distinct touches to the production. He's from Queens; I'm from the Bronx. We're both at home in New York. What a trip, a labor of love for us."

Oh how far you've come, Mr DiMucci!

And this was not the first collaboration between the two. In 1989, Paul joined Dion for "Written On A Subway Wall/Little Star" for Dion's Yo Frankie album.

 

 

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November 13 Music et al

November 13 Music et al

Get That Communist, Joe

In 1954: the Kavaliers sang “Get That Communist, Joe” in which they poked fun at McCarthy’s passion to find Communists everywhere. (see Jan 8)

Joe, come here a minute

I get a red hot tip for you, Joe

See that guy with the red suspenders

Driving that car with the bright red fenders

I know he’s one of those heavy spenders

Get that Communist Joe

He’s fillin’ my gal with propaganda

And I’m scared she will meander

Don’t want to take a chance that he’ll land her

Get that Communist Joe

He’s a most revolting character

And the fellas hate him so

But with the girls this character

Is a Comrade Romeo

Since my love he’s sabotaging

And the law he has been dodging

Give him what he deserves, jailhouse lodging

Get that Communist Joe (Get that Shmo, Joe)

What’s Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A

November 13 Music et al

November 13, 1964: CBS TV shows a 50-minute documentary, “What’s Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A.,” filmed by Albert Maysles, covering the Beatles U.S. tour and other activities that year. 

Rolling Stone ranks the movie the 10th best rock documentary: Two years after the landmark Lonely Boy brought cinema vérité techniques backstage, the Maysles Brothers hitched a ride with the Fab Four on their first trans-Atlantic trip. Although Richard Lester would (lightly) fictionalize similar scenarios in A Hard Day's Night, no camera before or since ever got so close to capturing John, Paul, George and Ringo in anything like their natural state; you can almost see the walls coming up as they realize how unavoidably public their lives are about to become. The DVD version, retitled The First U.S. Visit, swaps out scenes highlighting the drudgery of promo-tour obligations in favor of the band's Ed Sullivan Showperformances — a fair trade, but it's worth seeking out the original, which still screens in theaters occasionally.(see Nov 23)

The Beatles in Yellow Submarine

and, oh yea,

The Sound of Music

November 13 Music et al
album cover for The Sound of Music
November 13 Music et al

Yellow Submarine

November 13 Music et al

November 13, 1968, the US release of Yellow Submarine movie. The review of the Beatles "Yellow Submarine" began, "YELLOW SUBMARINE," which opened yesterday, at the Forum and Tower East, is the Beatles' first feature length cartoon, designed, for the most part beautifully, by Heinz Edelmann, in styles ranging through Steinberg, Arshile Gorky, Bob Godfrey (of the short film "The Do It Yourself Cartoon Kit"), the Sgt. Pepper album cover, and -- mainly, really -- the spirit and conventions of the Sunday comic strip." (NYT review of Yellow Submarine) (see Nov 21)

Sound of Music

November 13 Music et al

November 13 –26, 1965, the Sound of Music soundtrack was the Billboard #1 album. This is how my brothers and sisters used to say goodnight, too.

November 13 Music, November 13 Music, November 13 Music, November 13 Music, November 13 Music

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November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13 Peace Love Activism

Women’s Health

Margaret Sanger
November 13, 1921,  Birth Control: the first national birth control conference in the U.S. (see Nov 11) was scheduled to end with an event featuring several speakers, but it was abruptly ended when New York City police intervened and removed Margaret Sanger and one other speaker from the stage. Sanger was arrested on charges of disorderly conduct. The New York Time's article headline was: A mass meeting to discuss "Birth Control: Is It Moral?" was broken up by the police at the Town Hall last night. Hundreds of men and women, many socially prominent, derided the police and urged the speakers to defy the order not to speak. (NYT article) (see Nov 18)

Black History

Scottboro Travesty
November 13, 1935: Creed Conyer becomes the first post-Reconstruction black person to sit on an Alabama grand jury in the remanded case. (see Scottsboro Travesty for full story)
Hansberry v. Lee
November 13 Peace Love Activism
Whites only housing
November 13, 1940: the US Supreme Court ruled in Hansberry v. Lee that whites cannot bar African Americans from white neighborhoods. (University of North Carolina site)
US Involvement in World War II
1941 – 1945: African-American soldiers played a significant role in World War II. More than half a million served in Europe. Despite the numbers they faced racial discrimination: prior to the war the military maintained a racially segregated force. In studies by the military, blacks were often classified as unfit for combat and were not allowed on the front lines. They were mostly given support duties, and were not allowed in units with white soldiers.

That changed in 1941, when pressure from African-American civil rights leaders convinced the government to set up all-black combat units, as experiments. They were designed to see if African-American soldiers could perform military tasks on the same level as white soldiers. (BH, see Jan 14)
Browder v. Gayle
November 13 Peace Love Activism
le
November 13, 1956: the US Supreme Court declined the appeal of a US District Court ruling in Browder v. Gayle that had declared unconstitutional Alabama's state and local laws requiring segregation on buses, thereby ending the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Court affirmed a ruling by a three-judge Federal court that held the challenged statutes "violate the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States." (BH, see Dec 4; MBB, see Dec 19)
Medgar Evers
November 13, 1991: Jackson, Miss. Judge L. Breland Hilburn of Hinds County Circuit Court denied bond to Byron De La Beckwith and ordered him to remain in jail pending his third murder trial in the 1963 slaying of the civil rights leader Medgar Evers. (see August 4, 1992)

Cold War

Mrs White bans Communist Robin Hood
November 13 Peace Love Activism
Obama as Robin Hood
November 13, 1953: Mrs. Thomas J. White of the Indiana Textbook Commission, called for the removal of references to the book Robin Hood from textbooks used by the state's schools. Mrs. Young claimed that there was "a Communist directive in education now to stress the story of Robin Hood because he robbed the rich and gave it to the poor. That's the Communist line. It's just a smearing of law and order and anything that disrupts law and order is their meat." She went on to attack Quakers because they "don't believe in fighting wars." This philosophy, she argued, played into communist hands. (Mrs Thomas White's anti-Robin Hood campaign)
Get That Communist, Joe
In 1954: the Kavaliers sang “Get That Communist, Joe” in which they poked fun at McCarthy’s passion to find Communists everywhere.  (see Jan 8)
Joe, come here a minute

I get a red hot tip for you, Joe

See that guy with the red suspenders

Driving that car with the bright red fenders

I know he’s one of those heavy spenders

Get that Communist Joe

He’s fillin’ my gal with propaganda

And I’m scared she will meander

Don’t want to take a chance that he’ll land her

Get that Communist Joe

He’s a most revolting character

And the fellas hate him so

But with the girls this character

Is a Comrade Romeo

Since my love he’s sabotaging

And the law he has been dodging

Give him what he deserves, jailhouse lodging

Get that Communist Joe (Get that Shmo, Joe)

Fourth Amendment, United States v. Jeffers

November 13, 1951: United States v Jeffers. Without a warrant, two police officers had entered a District of Columbia hotel room rented to the aunts of Anthony Jeffers when neither they nor Jeffers were present. The police searched the room and seized 19 bottles of cocaine and one bottle of codeine. Jeffers claimed ownership of the contraband and was charged and convicted of violating narcotics laws in a District Court despite his motion to suppress the evidence seized without a warrant as a violation of the Fourth Amendment. The Court of Appeals reversed the conviction and the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case.

In affirming the ruling of the Court of Appeals, Justice Clark held that the warrantless seizure did violate the Fourth Amendment and that the narcotics should have been excluded as evidence at Jeffers trial. Justice Clark wrote "The search and seizure were not incident to a valid arrest; and there were no exceptional circumstances to justify their being made without a warrant."

The Government had argued in this case that no property rights within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment existed in the seized narcotics because they were contraband as declared by Congress in 26 U.S.C. 3116. Justice Clark dismissed their argument, holding that, for purposes of the exclusionary rule, it was property and that Jeffers was entitled to motion to have it suppressed as evidence at trial but that, because it was contraband, he was not entitled to have it returned to him. (Unlawful evidence) (see January 2, 1952)
see November 13 Music et al for more
The Beatles
November 13, 1964: CBS TV shows a 50-minute documentary, “What’s Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A.,” filmed by Albert Maysles, covering the Beatles U.S. tour and other activities that year. (see Nov 23)
Sound of Music
November 13 –26, 1965, the Sound of Music soundtrack is the Billboard #1 album.
Yellow Submarine
November 13, 1968: US release of Yellow Submarine movie. (see Nov 21)

Vietnam

Spiro T. Agnew

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1968: speaking in Des Moines, Iowa, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew accused network television news departments of bias and distortion, and urged viewers to lodge complaints. (see Dec 31)
March Against Death

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1969: in Washington, as a prelude to the second moratorium against the war scheduled for the following weekend, protesters staged a symbolic "March Against Death." The march began at 6 p.m. and drew over 45,000 participants, each with a placard bearing the name of a soldier who had died in Vietnam. The marchers began at Arlington National Cemetery and continued past the White House, where they called out the names of the dead. The march lasted for two days and nights. This demonstration and the moratorium that followed did not produce a change in official policy--although President Nixon was deeply angered by the protests, he publicly feigned indifference and they had no impact on his prosecution of the war. (NYT article) (see Nov 15)
Vietnam Veterans Memorial

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1982: the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. (NYT article on memorial) (see May 7, 1984)
November 13 Peace Love Activism

TERRORISM

November 13 Peace Love Activism

November 13, 1995: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a car bomb exploded at the U.S. military headquarters, killing 5 U.S. military servicemen. From the New York Times, More than 20 American investigators and hundreds of Saudi security officials searched the rubble of an American-run military training center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia today, looking for clues to the bombing that killed six people, including five Americans. (NYT article)(see June 25, 1996)

Sexual Abuse of Children

November 13, 2002:  Roman Catholic activists from the Survivors First group launch an online database listing 573 US priests accused of involvement in pedophilia since 1996, later dropping 100 of the names. (see Dec 3)

Stop and Frisk Policy

November 13, 2013: a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan refused to reconsider its order removing federal Judge Shira Scheindlin from court cases challenging the New York Police Department's stop-and-frisk policy. Scheindlin’s attorney, Burt Neuborne, had filed papers asking the panel to reconsider the order and saying the appeals judges had offended due process by ousting her without letting her defend herself. The panel denied Neuborne's request, saying it lacked a procedural basis. "We know of no precedent suggesting that a district judge has standing before an appellate court to protest reassignment of a case," the judges ruled. (S & F, see Nov 14; ruling, see Nov 22)

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