November 9 Peace Love Activism

November 9 Peace Love Activism

Feminism

Matilda Josyln Gage
November 9 Peace Love ActivismNovember 9, 1882: Gage’s daughter,Maud, married L. Frank Baum in the parlor of the Gage home. Under the influence of his wife and mother-in-law, Baum became an enthusiastic convert to feminism. He was, ''a secure man who did not worry about asserting his masculine authority,'' and he was not bothered that Maud had the upper hand in the marriage; in fact he seemed to welcome her take-charge attitude. His feminist beliefs would have a profound effect on his fiction. Nearly all of his child heroes were girls, girls who rely on their own resources and not on the aid, or validation, of men. He thought men who did not support feminist aspirations ''selfish, opinionated, conceited or unjust -- and perhaps all four combined,'' as he wrote in a newspaper editorial. ''The tender husband, the considerate father, the loving brother, will be found invariably championing the cause of women.''(Feminism, see March 8, 1884; Gage, see "March" 1886)

US Labor History

John L Lewis

November 9 Peace Love Activism

November 9, 1935: United Mine Workers president John L. Lewis and other labor leaders formed the Committee for Industrial Organization.
Joe Hill
In 1936, based on a 1925 poem by Alfred Hayes (1911 – 1985), Earl Robinson (1910 – 1991) wrote the song “Joe Hill” in 1936. Joan Baez has sung the song throughout her career, most notably at the 1969 Woodstock Music and Arts Festival [at the time of the concert, Baez’s husband, David Harris, was in prison for draft evasion]. (see Dec 30)

INDEPENDENCE DAY

November 9, 1953: Cambodia independent from France. (see October 26, 1955)

Black History

Emmett Till
November 9, 1955:  returning to Mississippi one last time, Moses Wright and Willie Reed testified before a LeFlore County grand jury in Greenwood, Mississippi. The grand jury refused to indict Milam or Bryant for kidnapping. The two men go free. 

November 9, 1961: the Professional Golfers Association eliminated the "Caucasian" clause from its constitution. (BH, see Nov 17; see Emmett Till)
PGA
November 9, 1961: the Professional Golfers Association eliminated the "Caucasian" clause from its constitution. (see Nov 17)
George Whitmore, Jr
November 9, 1964: Whitmore’s trial for the attempted rape and assault of Borrero opened in Brooklyn. (When a defendant faces trials for more than one crime, it is a common tactic of prosecutors to try the least serious case first so that, if convicted, the defendant will have a criminal record when he goes to trial for a more serious crime. This will discourage the defendant from taking the stand in the latter trial. If the defendant nonetheless chooses to testify, the prior conviction may be used for impeachment purposes on cross examination. It also may be used against the defendant at sentencing.) (see George Whitmore)
SOUTH AFRICA/APARTHEID
November 9, 1976: The United Nations General Assembly approved 10 resolutions condemning apartheid in South Africa. (see April 27, 1977)
Timothy M. Wolfe resigns
November 9, 2015, Timothy M. Wolfe, the president of the University of Missouri system, announced that he was resigning amid a wave of student protests over the school’s handling of racial tensions. Wolfe announced his resignation as the university’s governing board met in Columbia, the centerpiece of the four-campus system. Wolfe took to the podium before a meeting of the Board of Curators and made the announcement before a room full of reporters and other spectators. The announcement seemed to jar the people in the room. (see January 8, 2016)

see November 9 Music et al for more

Beatles
November 9, 1961, The Beatles before their US appearance: The Beatles performed at the Cavern Club at lunchtime. That night they appear at Litherland Town Hall, Liverpool (their final performance at that venue). This is a major day for The Beatles, although they are unaware of it at the time--in the audience at the Cavern Club show is Brian Epstein, dressed in his pin-stripe suit and seeing The Beatles for the first time. Accompanying Epstein is his assistant Alistair Taylor. Epstein will recall his first impressions in a 1964 interview: "They were fresh and they were honest, and they had:star quality. Whatever that is, they had it, or I sensed that they had it." Over the next few weeks, Epstein becomes more and more interested in possibly managing The Beatles and he does a lot of research into just exactly what that would entail. When he speaks with the group's embittered ex-manager Allan Williams, he is told, "Brian, don't touch 'em with a fucking barge pole." Nonetheless, Epstein invites The Beatles to a meeting at his record store on December 3. 
James Brown
November 9, 1968: James Brown gave support to the civil rights movement with his song, "Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud (Part 1)," which hit number one on the R & B charts for a record sixth straight week.

FREE SPEECH

March 9, 1964: New York Times v. Sullivan. The First Amendment, as applied through the Fourteenth, protected a newspaper from being sued for libel in state court for making false defamatory statements about the official conduct of a public official, because the statements were not made with knowing or reckless disregard for the truth. Supreme Court of Alabama reversed and remanded, i.e. the Court held that defamatory falsehoods about public officials can be punished -- only  if the offended official can prove the falsehoods were published with "actual malice," i.e.: "knowledge that the statement was false or with reckless disregard of whether it was false or not." Other kinds of "libelous statements" are also punishable. (FS, see Mar 30; Sullivan, see April 6)

Vietnam

War Protest
November 9, 1965: in New York City, 22-year-old Catholic Worker Movement member Roger Allen LaPorte set himself on fire in front of the United Nations building in protest of the war. Before dying the next day, LaPorte declared, "I'm against wars, all wars. I did this as a religious act." (NYT article) (see Nov 14)
Massachusetts v. Laird
November 9, 1970: the Supreme Court voted 6-3 in Massachusetts v. Laird not to hear the case of Massachusetts's anti-draft law. The state had passed a law which allowed its citizens to decline to fight in any undeclared war, even if the person was drafted. The law was passed in opposition to the draft and the war in Vietnam. The 1st Circuit found the war constitutional and thus struck down the law. (see Nov 17)

Native Americans

Alcatraz Takeover

 

November 9 Peace Love Activism
Richard Oakes on Alcatraz
November 9, 1969: Mohawk Indian Richard Oakes leads an attempt to occupy Alcatraz Island twice in one day. Fourteen Native Americans stay overnight and leave peacefully the following morning.  The video following is a report on the takeover. (see Nov 20)

LGBTQ

Jones v. Hallahan
November 9, 1973: The Kentucky Court of Appeals ruled in Jones v. Hallahan that same-sex couples may not marry. The case came after Marjorie Jones and Tracy Knight applied for and were denied a marriage license in Jefferson County, KY. (see Dec 15)

November 9 Peace Love Activism

Dissolution of the USSR

Fall of the Berlin Wall
November 9, 1989: East Germany’s communist government allowed all citizens direct passage to the west, rendering the Berlin Wall obsolete. (NYT article) (see Nov 28)

Iraq War II

November 9, 2006: Iraqi health minister reports 150,000 Iraqi civilians have been killed in the war — “about three times previously accepted estimates.” (see Dec 2)

Arthur Bremer

November 9, 2007: after 35 years of incarceration, Arthur Bremer (shot George Wallace) was released from prison. His probation ends in 2025.

DEATH PENALTY

November 9, 2016: Nebraskans voted overwhelmingly to restore the death penalty and nullify the historic 2015 vote by state lawmakers to repeal capital punishment. Rural voters voted to "repeal the repeal" by margins as large as 4-to-1 in counties outside Lincoln and Omaha. (see Dec 13)

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John’s Older Brother Tom Fogerty

John’s Older Brother Tom Fogerty

John's Older Brother Tom Fogerty

November 9, 1941 – September 6, 1990

 

Creedence Clearwater Revival's John Fogerty could certainly write hits: 
  • Green River
  • Fortunate Son
  • Born on the Bayou
  • Proud Mary
  • Who’ll Stop the Rain
  • Bad Moon Rising
  • Lookin’ Out My Back door
  • Down on the Corner
  • Have You Ever Seen the Rain
  • Up Around the Bend

...and many many more. At a time when so-called underground FM radio station bands were making concept albums, CCR stuck with the older format churning out albums full songs that typically stayed within AM radio's strictures of under 4 minutes and more often under three minutes.

John's success overshadowed the artistic hopes of the other band members like his older brother.

Background

Tom Fogerty was born in Berkeley, California.  He formed a band, Spider Webb and the Insects, that Del-Fi Records signed in 1959.  Spider Webb only recorded one song for the label, “Lyda Jane,” but it was never released and the group broke up shortly thereafter.

Tom joined John's band, the Blue Velvets, in 1960. The Blue Velvets had limited local success in the San Francisco Bay area.

The four signed with Fantasy Records in 1964. There they were briefly the Visions, the Golliwogs,  and finally, in late 1967, Creedence Clearwater Revival.

Stardom

That elusive success suddenly exploded upon them: between July 1968 and December 1970, Creedence released six albums and top 10 hit after hit. The band was more a back up for John than a collaboration. Tom, the original front singer and whose own compositions were hardly included in the band's albums, led to his leaving the band in 1971. 

He signed a solo deal with Fantasy in 1972 and released the first of his six solo albums, Tom Fogerty, in 1972.  His other albums were:
  • Excalibur (1972)
  • Zephyr National (1974)
  • Myopia (1974)
  • Deal It Out (1981)
  • Sidekicks (with Randy Oda) (released posthumously in 1992)
  • The Very Best of Tom Fogerty (1999)
None had any of the commercial success that CCR had. CCR itself broken up by 1972. Most say due to John's continued insistence that all band-related issues be his to decide. 

Tom moved to Scottsdale, Arizona in the ‘80s. He underwent back surgery, but an unscreened blood transfusion infected him with the AIDS virus. It led to his death, officially of tuberculosis, on Sept. 6, 1990.

John’s Older Brother Tom Fogerty

In a July 18, 2014 interview in Uncut, band bassist Stu Cook said, “Tom had put up with a lot of shit from John. I think Tom was expecting John to say, ‘OK, now we’ve achieved our goals, why don’t you start singing a few of the songs?’ Tom had a great voice, kinda like Ritchie Valens. Tom would have done a damn good job on ‘La Bamba’. But John didn’t want him to sing it, in case we had a hit with it. He didn’t want Tom to succeed.”

The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993. One of the most infamous inductions of any band in the Hall's history. According to The History of Tom Fogerty of Creedence Clearwater Revival from the Ultimate Classic Rock site:  When Creedence Clearwater Revival was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame...Tom Fogerty’s widow brought his ashes in an urn. John, however, refused to share the stage with his former bandmates.

The feud between the remaining three band mates (though obviously "mates" is not the word to use) continues.

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November 9 Music Beatles James Brown

November 9 Music Beatles James Brown

The Beatles

Cavern Club
Beatles in the Cavern Club
Beatles in the Cavern Club
On November 9, 1961 The Beatles performed at the Cavern Club at lunchtime. That night they appeared at Litherland Town Hall, Liverpool (their final performance at that venue). 

This was a major day for The Beatles, although they are unaware of it at the time--in the audience at the Cavern Club show was Brian Epstein, dressed in his pin-stripe suit and seeing The Beatles for the first time. 

Accompanying Epstein was his assistant Alistair Taylor. Epstein will recall his first impressions in a 1964 interview: "They were fresh and they were honest, and they had:star quality. Whatever that is, they had it, or I sensed that they had it." Over the next few weeks, Epstein becomes more and more interested in possibly managing The Beatles and he does a lot of research into just exactly what that would entail. When he speaks with the group's embittered ex-manager Allan Williams, he is told, "Brian, don't touch 'em with a fucking bargepole." Nonetheless, Epstein invited The Beatles to a meeting at his record store on December 3.
Five years later…
Yoko Ono poster for show at The Indica Gallery
Yoko Ono poster for show at The Indica Gallery

Yoko Ono @ The Indica Gallery

November 9, 1966: John Lennon visited the Indica Gallery in London where he met Yoko Ono who was displaying her art. The Indica Gallery was in the basement of the Indica Bookshop in Mason's Yard, just off Duke Street in Mayfair, London and co-owned by John Dunbar, Peter Asher, and Barry Miles, and was supported in its early years by Paul McCartney.
November 9 Music Beatles James Brown

James Brown

Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud
James Brown, say it loud I'm black and I'm proud
James Brown
November 9, 1968: singer James Brown gave support to the civil rights movement with his song, "Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud (Part 1)," which hit number one on the R & B charts for a record sixth straight week.

From schmoop.com: ...the song was also – more of a rarity for the Godfather of Soul – deeply political. "Say It Loud (I'm Black and I'm Proud)" was almost a revolutionary statement in 1968, and one laced with more than a little bit of irony. Brown said he recorded the tune as a kind of children's song, hoping to instill pride in the younger generation. But many whites heard it only as militant and angry, costing Brown a good chunk of his interracial crossover audience. And those kids happily shouting out the chorus, "I'm black and I'm proud"? In another ironic twist, most of them were actually white or Asian schoolchildren.

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