September 24

September 24

September 24, 1922, BLACK HISTORY: the National Equal Rights League sent a telegram to President Harding calling for a special session of Congress to act on the Dyer Anti-Lynching bill. Congress had adjourned without completing consideration of the bill.
September 24September 24, 1951: Haywood Patterson , one of the falsely accused so-called "Scottboro Boys" was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 6 to 15 years. He died of cancer less than a year later.

September 24

September 24, 1965, News Music: Irwin Silber, editor of Sing Out!’ (a magazine of recordings), singer Barbara Dane, and Pete Seeger, along with the cream of the folk establishment organized a two-part “Sing-In For Peace” concert at Carnegie Hall. The concert featured sixty black and white artists. The Fugs performed their scathing “Kill for Peace.” Unfortunately, a local newspaper strike prevented much media coverage, but the concert marked a turning point in the peace song movement. As Silber remarked in Sing Out!, “the essence of the creative union between folksong and social value had been recaptured.”

 

September 24, 1965, BLACK HISTORY: President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Executive Order 11246. It, established requirements for non-discriminatory practices in hiring and employment on the part of U.S. government contractors. It "prohibits federal contractors and federally assisted construction contractors and subcontractors, who do over $10,000 in Government business in one year from discriminating in employment decisions on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin." It also required contractors to "take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, color, religion, sex or national origin." The phrase "affirmative action" had appeared previously in Executive Order 10925 in 1961.
September 24 – October 14, 1966: “Cherish” by the Association #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

September 24, 1976, Symbionese Liberation Army:  Newspaper heiress Patty Hearst sentenced to seven years in prison for her part in a 1974 bank robbery.


September 24, 1982, AIDS: CDC uses the term “AIDS” (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) for the first time, and releases the first case definition of AIDS: “a disease at least moderately predictive of a defect in cell-mediated immunity, occurring in a person with no known case for diminished resistance to that disease.”
September 24, 1996, Nuclear news: the US and the world's other major nuclear powers signed a treaty to end all testing and development of nuclear weapons.


September 24, 2014, Native Americans: the Obama administration agreed to pay the Navajo Nation a record $554 million to settle longstanding claims by America's largest Indian tribe that its funds and natural resources were mishandled for decades by the U.S. government.


The accord, resolved claims that dated back as far as 50 years and marked the biggest U.S. legal settlement with a single tribe

The deal stemmed from litigation accusing the government of mismanaging Navajo trust accounts and resources on more than 14 million acres of land held in trust for the tribe and leased for such purposes as farming, energy development, logging and mining.