September 13 Peace Love Activism

September 13 Peace Love Activism

BLACK HISTORY

Slave Revolts
September 13, 1663: first serious slave conspiracy in colonial America. White servants and black slaves conspired to revolt in Gloucester County, VA, but were betrayed by a fellow servant. (see article) (BH, see February 18, 1688; SR, see February 28, 1708)
Oberlin, Ohio citizens
September 13, 1858: a group of Oberlin, Ohio citizens stopped Kentucky slave catchers from capturing John Price, a black man. Oberlinians, black and white, pursued the abductors to nearby Wellington at word of Price’s kidnapping and took him back, later helping him across the Canadian border to freedom. (see Sept 17)
James H Meredith
September 13, 1962: the US District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi reordered the University of Mississippi to enroll Meredith. (see September 20, 1962)
Attica Prison Riot
September 13, 1971: state troopers dropped tear gas into the Attica prison while other troopers opened fire on a group of over 1,200 inmates. In the chaos, the police gunfire killed 10 hostages and 29 inmates Another 80 people were seriously wounded, the majority of them inmates, in what became the bloodiest prison uprising in U.S. history. Adding to the death toll were three inmates and a guard who had been killed earlier during the riot.

“We are men. We are not beasts, and we do not intend to be beaten or driven as such.” –L.D. Barkley, a 21 year-old prisoner serving time for breaching parole by driving without a license; he died in the assault, shot 15 times at point-blank range. (BH, see Sept 17; APR, see Sept 17)
 
George Wallace
September 13, 1998: George Wallace died. (see Sept 17)
School Desegregation
September 13, 2013: nearly a week after the University of Alabama came under fire for persistent segregation in its sorority system, school officials announced a deal that would clear the way for black women to be admitted to the school’s prestigious and historically white Greek organizations. The deal was the first step toward ending more than a century of systematic segregation in the school’s sorority system. (NYT obit) (BH, see Oct 15; SD, see March 21, 2014)
September 13 Peace Love Activism

Vietnam

September 13, 1945: in accordance with the Potsdam Agreements at the end of World War II, 5,000 British troops of the 20th Indian Division, commanded by Gen. Douglas Gracey, arrived in southern Indochina to disarm the defeated Japanese forces  Gracey detested the Viet Minh and rearmed some 1,400 French soldiers who had been imprisoned by the Japanese. This effectively was the first step in the re-establishment of French colonial rule and set the stage for the conflict between the French and the Viet Minh that led to a nine-year war. (see Sept 26)

September 13 Music et al

Payola
September 13, 1960: the Federal Communications act in the USA was amended to outlaw payments of cash or gifts in exchange for airplay of records. (see June 1, 1961)
Yesterday
September 13, 1965: Beatles released Paul McCartney 's composition 'Yesterday' as a single in the US. The final recording was so different from other works by The Beatles that the band members vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom. (However, it was issued as a single there in 1976.) (see Sept 25)
 
see Big Sur for more
September 13 – 14, 1969: Sixth Big Sur Folk Festival. Made into a movie: Celebration at Big Sur (Festival, see Oct 4; Big Sur, see Oct 3, 1970)
see Toronto Rock and Roll Revival for more
September 13, 1969: The Toronto Rock and Roll Revival (Varsity Stadium, at the University of Toronto) over 20,000 attended. The appearance of John Lennon, Yoko Ono and The Plastic Ono Band was not publicly known in advance. It was Lennon's first-ever public rock performance without one or more of the Beatles since meeting Paul McCartney in 1957. He decided before returning to England to leave the Beatles permanently. (Beatles, see Sept 20)
September 13 Peace Love Activism

Iran–Contra Affair

September 13, 1985:  Iran received 508 US-made Tow missiles, as part of secret arms-for-hostages deal with US. (see Jan 17, 1986)

ADA

September 13, 1988: the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 expands on the Civil Rights Act of 1968 to require that a certain number of accessible housing units be created in all new multi-family housing. The act covers both public and private homes and not only those in receipt of federal funding. (see March 12, 1990)

Feminism

September 13, 1994: the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (VAWA) signed by President Bill Clinton. The Act provided monies toward investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women, imposeed automatic and mandatory restitution on those convicted, and allowed civil redress in cases prosecutors chose to leave un-prosecuted. The Act also establisheed the Office on Violence Against Women within the Department of Justice. Its coverage extended to male victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. (Feminism, see, Sept 28, 1994; VAWA, see May 15, 2000)

DEATH PENALTY

September 13, 1994: President Clinton signed crime bill making dozens of federal crimes subject to death penalty. (see February 8, 1995)

September 13 Peace Love Activism,  September 13 Peace Love Activism,  September 13 Peace Love Activism,